Alvin L Young - A.L. Young Consulting, Inc. - Principal Scientist

Alvin L Young

A.L. Young Consulting, Inc.

Principal Scientist

Cheyenne, WY | United States

Additional Specialties: Environmental Toxicology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3270-1883

Alvin L Young - A.L. Young Consulting, Inc. - Principal Scientist

Alvin L Young

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: A.L. Young Consulting, Inc. - Cheyenne, WY , United States

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

13Publications

163Reads

31Profile Views

A Review of Public Health in Vietnam: 50 Years After Agent Orange was Sprayed

Authors:
Alvin L. Young

Heph 2019 Mar 2 (2):170-180

Health Education and Public Health

Abstract: Normal relations between the United States and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in 1995 permitted scientists, public health experts, and the media to visit Vietnam and assess the impact of the use of Agent Orange on the ecology and peoples of Vietnam. Evaluation of scientific data suggested that exposures to the toxic contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD, in2,4,5-T-containing herbicides sprayed on jungle forests and mangroves were minimal for Vietnamese located in villages near combat areas. Although some tactical herbicides were sprayed in rural areas, the largest sources of polychlorinated dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) were from biomass-burning, especially from municipal dumpsites. In urban areas, sources of PCDD/Fs were from industrial emissions. Measurable levels of PCDD/Fs in Vietnamese were in those residents associated with dioxin "hotspots", specifically from former airbases where Agent Orange had been stored or loaded on US military aircraft. These hotspots were characterized by high soil and sediments levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD that persisted in spill sites over 50 years. Movement of low levels of PCDD/Fs into food sources were a continuing source of contamination for residents adjacent to hotspots. However, levels of TCDD in the tissues were generally comparable to other Asian populations. Allegations of cancers, other diseases, and horrific birth defects due to residual dioxins on the public health of those communities have not been validated. The Us and Vietnam have committed to remediation of the hotspots in Southern Vietnam. The Public Health of the Vietnamese continues to improve due to regulatory actions of Vietnam's government to reduce industrial and atmospheric pollution.

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March 2019
1 Read

Agent Orange: A Controversy without End

Authors:
Alvin L. Youing

EPP 3 (4): 100-108

Environmental Pollution and Protection

Abstract: Confusion and misinformation are common when discussing Agent Orange, a tactical herbicide used in the Vietnam War. This is partially the result of inaccurate news coverage or false information that is purposely spread to deceive veterans.  Sensationalized reporting has frequently left the public with a distorted view of what occurred in Vietnam and of the minimal risks related to the use of herbicides in an operational combat environment. However, such a discrepancy between perceived risks and actual risks has also been enhanced by a public policy where historical records and science have been ignored while favoring a policy of "presumptive" compensation promoted by the Agent Orange Act of 1991. The Act has resulted in a narrow focus on tactical herbicides as the key factor in explaining the health risks of Vietnam veterans, ignoring other important risk factors that occurred in the war in Vietnam, namely, widespread endemic tropical diseases and parasites, psychological and impacts of war, and health and lifestyle. Thus, it is not surprising that the controversies surrounding the use of Agent Orange in Vietnam have raged for 40 years. Indeed, more than a million United States veterans and billions of dollars have been spent by the United States Department Veterans Affairs in providing compensation and health care for unrelated diseases where the vast majorities are not deployment-related health problems or related to herbicide exposure but rather to aging and quality of life issues.

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November 2018
1 Read

Agent Orange Use in Vietnam and Alleged Health Impacts: A Review

MRA 5 (10): 20 pages

Medical Research Archives

Abstract: Physicians and other members of the medical community frequently are asked about "Agent Orange" and potentially "associated" health issues. The Vietnam War officially ended in 1975, but concerns over the legacy of Agent Orange linger to this day. Under the Agent Orange Act of 1991, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) recognizes 14 diseases associated with alleged exposure to Agent Orange, its associated dioxin (TCDD) contaminant, and other tactical herbicides used in combat operations in Vietnam during the war. The medical community needs to understand why Agent Orange has become a national public health issue, and be prepared to respond to questions by veterans and the public. Although the Institute of Medicine (IOM) provided recommendations to DVA on medical issues, they were directed by the Act to develop "statistical associations" for human diseases rather than to establish cause and effect relationships. No IOM report determined a consistent, coherent, and credible evidence of a causal connection between a disease and exposure to Agent Orange. The reality is that the current Agent Orange Policy is based on politics driven by public, media, veteran and congressional actions. Special evaluations and considerations must be given to the numerous health studies of our Vietnam Era veterans and what they have indicated. Perhaps we could have been fairer to all Vietnam veterans with a program of 'Vietnam experience' benefits rather than Agent Orange benefits. Greater efforts should have been made to study how societal pressures and politics have played a larger role than the efforts of the scientific and medical communities in providing health answers for our Vietnam veterans and the Vietnamese, all who now continue to suffer the lasting effects of war.

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October 2017
1 Read

Agent Orange exposure and attributed health effects in Vietnam veterans.

Mil Med 2011 Jul;176(7 Suppl):29-34

A.L. Young Consulting, Inc., 1810 Tranquility Road, Cheyenne, WY 82009, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/milmed-d-11-00082DOI Listing
July 2011
22 Reads

Panel 5: educating leaders on identifying and mitigating environmental exposure risks.

Mil Med 2011 Jul;176(7 Suppl):110-2

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/milmed-d-11-00071DOI Listing
July 2011
4 Reads

The realignment and reorganization of ESPR.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2009 May;16(3):243-7

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11356-009-0155-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-009-0155-zDOI Listing
May 2009
4 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

Finding the balance between food and biofuels.

Authors:
Alvin L Young

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2009 Mar 18;16(2):117-9. Epub 2009 Feb 18.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-009-0106-8DOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads
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Accolades for Almut Beate Heinrich, our Managing-Editor.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2008 Jun;15(4):291-2

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-008-0015-2DOI Listing
June 2008
102 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

2nd Agent Orange and Dioxin Remediation Workshop. Hanoi, Viet Nam, 18-20 June 2007.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2008 Mar;15(2):113-8

Institute for Science and Public Policy, Sarkeys Energy Center, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.

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March 2008
2 Reads
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Operation FLYSWATTER: a war within a war.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2008 Jan;15(1):3-7

The RANCH HAND Vietnam Association, Hurricane, Utah, USA.

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January 2008
4 Reads
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A conflict between science and social concerns: Agent Orange.

Authors:
Alvin L Young

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2008 Jan;15(1):1-2

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January 2008
5 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

ESPR´s Total Environment.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2007 Jan;14 Suppl 1:1-2

Dr. Markus Hecker Visiting Assistant Professor Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory 218c National Food Safety & Toxicology Center Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 USA  ,  ,  ,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1065/espr2007.04.405DOI Listing
January 2007
5 Reads
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Globalization of environmental research.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2007 Jan;14(1):1-2

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January 2007
10 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Paul F Cecil
Paul F Cecil

The RANCH HAND Vietnam Association

2
Markus Hecker
Markus Hecker

University of Saskatchewan

1
Christian Steinberg
Christian Steinberg

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

1
Zhihong Xu
Zhihong Xu

Institute of Botany

1
Wim Salomons
Wim Salomons

Kromme Elleboog 21

1
Paul Roos
Paul Roos

Maastricht University (CAPHRI - School for Public Health and Primary care)

1