Publications by authors named "Alumuku Iordepuun Micheal"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

COVID-19 and progress towards achieving universal health coverage in Africa: A case of Nigeria.

Int J Health Plann Manage 2021 Sep 23;36(5):1417-1422. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Global Health Focus, London, UK.

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) 2030 is a global health target, and countries are making efforts to convert plans into tangible results. Nigeria, the most populated country in Africa, has made commitments towards UHC2030 target but is underperforming across many building blocks of health and progress has been slow. The arrival of COVID-19 poses additional pressure on the already feeble health system causing the government to direct focus towards containing the pandemic. However, existing gaps in health workforce density, weak primary health care infrastructure and inadequate budgetary allocation have resulted in inequitable access to basic healthcare services. This situation weighs most heavily on the poor who are mostly part of the informal economy thereby pushing people further into poverty. On the other hand, COVID-19 has provided valuable insights into Nigeria's current health system status which hopefully can be helpful in strengthening efforts towards building resilient health system and preparing the country towards future pandemic. The pandemic has highlighted the importance of essential health services and the need to strengthen primary healthcare system. It is, therefore, important that stakeholders in Nigeria and other African countries carry out situation analysis of the current health systems towards achieving UHC2030.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8426814PMC
September 2021

Sex Workers Should not Be Forgotten in Africa's COVID-19 Response.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2020 11;103(5):1780-1782

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

COVID-19 is a global health emergency facing many countries around the world. Sex workers in Africa are among one of the vulnerable populations disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic on the continent. Sex workers are excluded from African government safety net, and this may force some sex workers back to sex work amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of the nature of sex work, physical distancing and other precautionary measures are impossible to observe, further compromising COVID-19 response. Sex workers in Africa have been known to face high levels of stigma and discrimination, including limited access to healthcare services. Disruption in HIV care and prevention services due to the pandemic among this key population may have negative impacts on the hard-won achievements in HIV response in Africa. In addition, stigma and discrimination toward sex workers could also make contact tracing challenging and limit access to COVID-19 testing among this vulnerable group. With the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for the UN Development Program, UN member states all pledged to ensure "no one will be left behind" and to "endeavor to reach the furthest behind first." This could not be more important than now as sex workers as a part of the population are left behind in COVID-19 response in Africa. It is important that the African government should ensure collective and inclusive response in the fight against COVID-19. Sex workers should not be forgotten in Africa's COVID-19 response because no one is safe, until all are safe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-1045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7646811PMC
November 2020

Prevalence and Socio-economic Impacts of Malnutrition Among Children in Uganda.

Nutr Metab Insights 2019 25;12:1178638819887398. Epub 2019 Nov 25.

School of Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

Malnutrition is one of the common problems that afflict the poor in low- and middle-income countries like Uganda. The rate of decline of malnutrition in the country has been very slow for the last 15 years. This problem is of utmost concern in this era of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in which achieving the goals is imperative. The aim of our study was to review literature on the prevalence and socio-economic impacts of malnutrition among children under 5 in Uganda and provide recommendations to address identified gaps. This review assesses available evidences, including journal articles, country reports, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Funds (UNICEF) reports, and other reports on issues pertaining to malnutrition among children in Uganda. Malnutrition, poverty, and chronic diseases are interconnected in such a way that each of the factors influences the presence and permanence of the other, resulting in a synergistic impact. The prevalence of acute and severe malnutrition among children under 5 is above the World Health Assembly target to reduce and maintain the prevalence under 5% by 2025. There are also limited studies on etiology of anemia as regards its prevalence in Uganda. The study presents a better understanding of the social and economic impact of child malnutrition on the families and the country's development. The study also strongly suggests that, for Uganda to achieve sustainable development goal 2, financial investments by the government are necessary to address nutrition in the early stages of an individual's life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1178638819887398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6878600PMC
November 2019
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