Publications by authors named "Almudena Escobar-Niño"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An arsRB resistance operon confers tolerance to arsenite in the environmental isolate Terribacillus sp. AE2B 122.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2021 03;97(3)

Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Seville, Seville, 41012, Spain.

Terribacillus sp. AE2B 122 is an environmental strain isolated from olive-oil agroindustry wastes. This strain displays resistance to arsenic, one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens found in nature. Terribacillus sp. AE2B 122 possesses an unusual ars operon, consisting of the transcriptional regulator (arsR) and arsenite efflux pump (arsB) but no adjacent arsenate reductase (arsC) locus. Expression of arsR and arsB was induced when Terribacillus was exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of arsenate. Heterologous expression of the arsB homologue in Escherichia coli∆arsRBC demonstrated that it conferred resistance to arsenite and reduced the accumulation of arsenic inside the cells. Two members of the arsC-like family (Te3384 and Te2854) found in the Terribacillus genome were not induced by arsenic, but their heterologous expression in E. coli ∆arsC and ∆arsRBC increased the accumulation of arsenic in both strains. We found that both Te3384 and Te2854 slightly increased resistance to arsenate in E. coli ∆arsC and ∆arsRBC, possibly by chelation of arsenic or by increasing the resistance to oxidative stress. Finally, arsenic speciation assays suggest that Terribacillus is incapable of arsenate reduction, in agreement with the lack of an arsC homologue in the genome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiab015DOI Listing
March 2021

Development of New Antiproliferative Compound against Human Tumor Cells from the Marine Microalgae by Applied Proteomics.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Dec 24;22(1). Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Microbiology Laboratory, Institute of Viticulture and Agri-Food Research (IVAGRO), University of Cádiz, Pol. Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Cádiz, Spain.

Proteomics is a crucial tool for unravelling the molecular dynamics of essential biological processes, becoming a pivotal technique for basic and applied research. Diverse bioinformatic tools are required to manage and explore the huge amount of information obtained from a single proteomics experiment. Thus, functional annotation and protein-protein interactions are evaluated in depth leading to the biological conclusions that best fit the proteomic response in the system under study. To gain insight into potential applications of the identified proteins, a novel approach named "Applied Proteomics" has been developed by comparing the obtained protein information with the existing patents database. The development of massive sequencing technology and mass spectrometry (MS/MS) improvements has allowed the application of proteomics nonmodel microorganisms, which have been deeply described as a novel source of metabolites. Between them, has been pointed out as an alternative source of biomolecules. Recently, our research group has reported the first complete proteome analysis of this microalga, which was analysed using the applied proteomics concept with the identification of 488 proteins with potential industrial applications. To validate our approach, we selected the UCA01 protein from the prohibitin family. The recombinant version of this protein showed antiproliferative activity against two tumor cell lines, Caco2 (colon adenocarcinoma) and HepG-2 (hepatocellular carcinoma), proving that proteome data have been transformed into relevant biotechnological information. From has been developed a new tool against cancer-the protein named UCA01. This protein has selective effects inhibiting the growth of tumor cells, but does not show any effect on control cells. This approach describes the first practical approach to transform proteome information in a potential industrial application, named "applied proteomics". It is based on a novel bioalgorithm, which is able to identify proteins with potential industrial applications. From hundreds of proteins described in the proteome of , the bioalgorithm identified over 400 proteins with potential uses; one of them was selected as UCA01, "in vitro" and its potential was demonstrated against cancer. This approach has great potential, but the applications are potentially numerous and undefined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7795124PMC
December 2020

An "omic" approach to Pyrocystis lunula: New insights related with this bioluminescent dinoflagellate.

J Proteomics 2019 10 26;209:103502. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Microbiology Laboratory, Institute of Viticulture and Agri-food Research (IVAGRO), University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Spain. Electronic address:

Pyrocystis lunula (Schutt) is a photoautotrophic dinoflagellate without armored form, frequently found in marine environments. Today, there are several biotechnological applications derived from the bioluminescent system of this species. From a post-genomic perspective, in order to have a starting point for studying the proteome of P. lunula, an "omics" approach (transcriptomics-proteomics) was assessed using fresh microalgae samples. A total of 80,874,825 raw reads were generated (11,292,087,505 bp; 55.82% GC) by mRNA sequencing. Very high-quality sequences were assembled into 414,295 contigs (219,203,407 bp; 55.38% GC) using Trinity software, generating a comprehensive reference transcriptome for this species. Then, a P. lunula proteome was inferred and further employed for its analysis on this species. A total of 17,461 peptides were identified, yielding 3182 protein identification hits, including 175 novel proteins. The identified proteins were further categorized according to functional description and gene ontology classification. SIGNIFICANCE: The major contribution of the present work is making available a reference transcriptome and proteome of P. lunula, that is now accessible for the research community, and a functional description of the 3182 proteins inferred from the transcriptome, including 175 novel proteins, which have already been deposited in the ProteomeXchange and NCBI SRA databases, respectively. In addition to this, a series of important factors related to the bioluminescent system and the regulation of gene expression, were identified and described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2019.103502DOI Listing
October 2019

Proteomic study of the membrane components of signalling cascades of Botrytis cinerea controlled by phosphorylation.

Sci Rep 2019 07 8;9(1):9860. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research (IVAGRO), Microbiology Lab, University of Cadiz, Puerto Real, 11510, Spain.

Protein phosphorylation and membrane proteins play an important role in the infection of plants by phytopathogenic fungi, given their involvement in signal transduction cascades. Botrytis cinerea is a well-studied necrotrophic fungus taken as a model organism in fungal plant pathology, given its broad host range and adverse economic impact. To elucidate relevant events during infection, several proteomics analyses have been performed in B. cinerea, but they cover only 10% of the total proteins predicted in the genome database of this fungus. To increase coverage, we analysed by LC-MS/MS the first-reported overlapped proteome in phytopathogenic fungi, the "phosphomembranome" of B. cinerea, combining the two most important signal transduction subproteomes. Of the 1112 membrane-associated phosphoproteins identified, 64 and 243 were classified as exclusively identified or overexpressed under glucose and deproteinized tomato cell wall conditions, respectively. Seven proteins were found under both conditions, but these presented a specific phosphorylation pattern, so they were considered as exclusively identified or overexpressed proteins. From bioinformatics analysis, those differences in the membrane-associated phosphoproteins composition were associated with various processes, including pyruvate metabolism, unfolded protein response, oxidative stress response, autophagy and cell death. Our results suggest these proteins play a significant role in the B. cinerea pathogenic cycle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-46270-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6614480PMC
July 2019

A Straightforward Access to New Families of Lipophilic Polyphenols by Using Lipolytic Bacteria.

PLoS One 2016 17;11(11):e0166561. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.

The chemical synthesis of new lipophilic polyphenols with improved properties presents technical difficulties. Here we describe the selection, isolation and identification of lipolytic bacteria from food-processing industrial wastes, and their use for tailoring a new set of compounds with great interest in the food industry. These bacteria were employed to produce lipolytic supernatants, which were applied without further purification as biocatalysts in the chemoselective and regioselective synthesis of lipophilic partially acetylated phenolic compounds derived from olive polyphenols. The chemoselectivity of polyphenols acylation/deacylation was analyzed, revealing the preference of the lipases for phenolic hydroxyl groups and phenolic esters. In addition, the alcoholysis of peracetylated 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol resulted in a series of lipophilic 2-alkoxy-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl acetate through an unexpected lipase-mediated etherification at the benzylic position. These new compounds are more lipophilic and retained their antioxidant properties. This approach can provide access to unprecedented derivatives of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol with improved properties.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0166561PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5113952PMC
June 2017

Selection and characterization of biofuel-producing environmental bacteria isolated from vegetable oil-rich wastes.

PLoS One 2014 6;9(8):e104063. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.

Fossil fuels are consumed so rapidly that it is expected that the planet resources will be soon exhausted. Therefore, it is imperative to develop alternative and inexpensive new technologies to produce sustainable fuels, for example biodiesel. In addition to hydrolytic and esterification reactions, lipases are capable of performing transesterification reactions useful for the production of biodiesel. However selection of the lipases capable of performing transesterification reactions is not easy and consequently very few biodiesel producing lipases are currently available. In this work we first isolated 1,016 lipolytic microorganisms by a qualitative plate assay. In a second step, lipolytic bacteria were analyzed using a colorimetric assay to detect the transesterification activity. Thirty of the initial lipolytic strains were selected for further characterization. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 23 of the bacterial isolates were Gram negative and 7 were Gram positive, belonging to different clades. Biofuel production was analyzed and quantified by gas chromatography and revealed that 5 of the isolates produced biofuel with yields higher than 80% at benchtop scale. Chemical and viscosity analysis of the produced biofuel revealed that it differed from biodiesel. This bacterial-derived biofuel does not require any further downstream processing and it can be used directly in engines. The freeze-dried bacterial culture supernatants could be used at least five times for biofuel production without diminishing their activity. Therefore, these 5 isolates represent excellent candidates for testing biofuel production at industrial scale.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0104063PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123985PMC
April 2015