Publications by authors named "Almira Henic"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rps14, Csnk1a1 and miRNA145/miRNA146a deficiency cooperate in the clinical phenotype and activation of the innate immune system in the 5q- syndrome.

Leukemia 2019 07 16;33(7):1759-1772. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Department of Hematology, Oncology, Hemostaseology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.

RPS14, CSNK1A1, and miR-145 are universally co-deleted in the 5q- syndrome, but mouse models of each gene deficiency recapitulate only a subset of the composite clinical features. We analyzed the combinatorial effect of haploinsufficiency for Rps14, Csnk1a1, and miRNA-145, using mice with genetically engineered, conditional heterozygous inactivation of Rps14 and Csnk1a1 and stable knockdown of miR-145/miR-146a. Combined Rps14/Csnk1a1/miR-145/146a deficiency recapitulated the cardinal features of the 5q- syndrome, including (1) more severe anemia with faster kinetics than Rps14 haploinsufficiency alone and (2) pathognomonic megakaryocyte morphology. Macrophages, regulatory cells of erythropoiesis and the innate immune response, were significantly increased in Rps14/Csnk1a1/miR-145/146a deficient mice as well as in 5q- syndrome patient bone marrows and showed activation of the innate immune response, reflected by increased expression of S100A8, and decreased phagocytic function. We demonstrate that Rps14/Csnk1a1/miR-145 and miR-146a deficient macrophages alter the microenvironment and induce S100A8 expression in the mesenchymal stem cell niche. The increased S100A8 expression in the mesenchymal niche was confirmed in 5q- syndrome patients. These data indicate that intrinsic defects of the 5q- syndrome hematopoietic stem cell directly alter the surrounding microenvironment, which in turn affects hematopoiesis as an extrinsic mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41375-018-0350-3DOI Listing
July 2019

Antibacterial Defense of Human Airway Epithelial Cells from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Induced by Acute Exposure to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Modulation by Cigarette Smoke.

J Innate Immun 2017 8;9(4):359-374. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are a central component of the antibacterial activity of airway epithelial cells. It has been proposed that a decrease in antibacterial lung defense contributes to an increased susceptibility to microbial infection in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, whether reduced AMP expression in the epithelium contributes to this lower defense is largely unknown. We investigated the bacterial killing activity and expression of AMPs by air-liquid interface-cultured primary bronchial epithelial cells from COPD patients and non-COPD (ex-)smokers that were stimulated with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). In addition, the effect of cigarette smoke on AMP expression and the activation of signaling pathways was determined. COPD cell cultures displayed reduced antibacterial activity, whereas smoke exposure suppressed the NTHi-induced expression of AMPs and further increased IL-8 expression in COPD and non-COPD cultures. Moreover, smoke exposure impaired NTHi-induced activation of NF-κB, but not MAP-kinase signaling. Our findings demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of cultured airway epithelial cells induced by acute bacterial exposure was reduced in COPD and suppressed by cigarette smoke, whereas inflammatory responses persisted. These findings help to explain the imbalance between protective antibacterial and destructive inflammatory innate immune responses in COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000455193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5569706PMC
June 2018