PhD Alma Lilian Guerrero-Barrera, MD, PhD - Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Morfología - PhD

PhD Alma Lilian Guerrero-Barrera

MD, PhD

Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Morfología

PhD

Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes | Mexico

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Cell Biology, Cell Microbiology, Proteins, Molecular Diagnostic

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0952-8544


Top Author

PhD Alma Lilian Guerrero-Barrera, MD, PhD - Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Morfología - PhD

PhD Alma Lilian Guerrero-Barrera

MD, PhD

Introduction

I am Cell Biologist by CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico. I done a postdoctoral position at IBT-UNAM, Mexico. I done a research stay at Veterinarian Faculty of Montreal University. I am head of Morphology Departmet of the Aguascalientes Autonomus University, Mexico. I formed 11 doctors in science, 9 masters in science and 20 undergraduate students. My research interest is in Cell Microbiology and Cell Biology. I am also inerested in pathogen virulence markers.

Primary Affiliation: Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Morfología - Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes , Mexico

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View PhD Alma Lilian Guerrero-Barrera’s Resume / CV

Education

Jan 1999 - Dec 2000
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Instituto de Biotecnología
POSTDOCTORAL STAY
BIOLOGÍA MOLECULAR DE PLANTAS
Sep 1989 - Nov 1994
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN
Master in Sciences
Biología Celular
Sep 1989 - Nov 1994
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN
Master in Sciences
Biología Celular
Jan 1982 - Nov 1994
Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas
Bióloga
Biología

Experience

Jun 2017
Equipe de Recherche sur les Relations Matrice Extracellulaire-Cellule Equipe de Recherche sur les Relations Matrice Extracellulaire-Cellule
Guest-Professor
Cergy-Pontoise University
Jan 2009
Faculté de médicine vétérinaire
Sabbatical stay
Université de Montréal
Jan 1999 - Dec 2000
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Instituto de Biotecnología
Postdoctoral position
Biología Molecular de Plantas
Jan 1999
Cell Microbiology
Postdoctoral position
IBT-UNAM

Publications

48Publications

215Reads

2250Profile Views

65PubMed Central Citations

Incorporation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Preformed Biofilms by Escherichia coli Isolated From Drinking Water of Swine Farms

46. Ramirez-Castillo, F. Y., Loera-Muro, A., Vargas-Padilla, N. D., Moreno-Flores, A. C., Avelar-Gonzalez, F. J., Harel, J., Jacques, M., Oropeza, R., Barajas-Garcia, C. and Guerrero-Barrera, A. L. 2018. Incorporation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in preformed biofilms by Escherichia coli isola

Frontiers in Veterinary Science

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the etiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, represents one of the most important health problems in the swine industry worldwide and it is included in the porcine respiratory disease complex. One of the bacterial survival strategies is biofilm formation, which are bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix that could be attached to a living or an inert surface. Until recently, A. pleuropneumoniae was considered to be an obligate pathogen. However, recent studies have shown that A. pleuropneumoniae is present in farm drinking water. In this study, the drinking water microbial communities of Aguascalientes (Mexico) swine farms were analyzed, where the most frequent isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli. Biofilm formation was tested in vitro; producing E. coli biofilms under optimal growth conditions; subsequently, A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strains 4074 and 719) was incorporated to these biofilms. Interaction between both bacteria was evidenced, producing an increase in biofilm formation. Extracellular matrix composition of two-species biofilms was also characterized using fluorescent markers and enzyme treatments. In conclusion, results confirm that A. pleuropneumoniae is capable of integrates into biofilms formed by environmental bacteria, indicative of a possible survival strategy in the environment and a mechanism for disease dispersion.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2018.00184/full

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August 2018
6 Reads

An evaluation of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates in urinary tract infections from Aguascalientes, Mexico: cross-sectional study.

45. Ramírez-Castillo, F. Y., Moreno-Flores, A. C., Avelar-González, F. J., Márquez-Díaz, F., Harel, J. and Guerrero-Barrera, A. L. 2018. An evaluation of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates in urinary tract infections from Aguascalientes, Mexico: cross-sectional study. Ann. Clin. Microbiol

Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

BACKGROUND: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are one of the main bacteria causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). The rates of UPEC with high resistance towards antibiotics and multidrug-resistant bacteria have increased dramatically in recent years and could difficult the treatment. METHODS: The aim of the study was to determine multidrug-resistant bacteria, antibiotic resistance profile, virulence traits, and genetic background of 110 E. coli isolated from community (79 isolates) and hospital-acquired (31 isolates) urinary tract infections. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes presence was also investigated. A subset of 18 isolates with a quinolone-resistance phenotype was examined for common virulence genes encoded in diarrheagenic and extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli by a specific E. coli microarray. RESULTS: Female children were the group most affected by UTIs, which were mainly community-acquired. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam was most prevalent. A frequent occurrence of resistance toward ciprofloxacin (47.3%), levofloxacin (43.6%) and cephalosporins (27.6%) was observed. In addition, 63% of the strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR). Almost all the fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant strains showed MDR-phenotype. Isolates from male patients were associated to FQ-resistant and MDR-phenotype. Moreover, hospital-acquired infections were correlated to third generation cephalosporin and nitrofurantoin resistance and the presence of kpsMTII gene. Overall, fimH (71.8%) and fyuA (68.2%), had the highest prevalence as virulence genes among isolates. However, the profile of virulence genes displayed a great diversity, which included the presence of genes related to diarrheagenic E. coli. Out of 110 isolates, 25 isolates (22.7%) were positive to qnrA, 23 (20.9%) to qnrB, 7 (6.4%) to qnrS1, 7 (6.4%) to aac(6')lb-cr, 5 (4.5%) to qnrD, and 1 (0.9%) to qnrC genes. A total of 12.7% of the isolates harbored blaCTX-M genes, with blaCTX-M-15 being the most prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary tract infection due to E. coli may be difficult to treat empirically due to high resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Continuous surveillance of multidrug resistant organisms and patterns of drug resistance are needed in order to prevent treatment failure and reduce selective pressure. These findings may help choosing more suitable treatments of UTI patients in this region of Mexico.

https://ann-clinmicrob.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12941-018-0286-5

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July 2018
3 Reads

An evaluation of multi-drug resitant Escherichia coli isolates in urinary tract infections from Aguascalientes, Mexico: cross‐sectional study

Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob (2018) 17:34

Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

Abstract Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are one of the main bacteria causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). The rates of UPEC with high resistance towards antibiotics and multidrug‐resistant bacteria have increased dramatically in recent years and could difficult the treatment. Methods: The aim of the study was to determine multidrug‐resistant bacteria, antibiotic resistance profile, virulence traits, and genetic background of 110 E. coli isolated from community (79 isolates) and hospital‐acquired (31 isolates) urinary tract infections. The plasmid‐mediated quinolone resistance genes presence was also investigated. A subset of 18 isolates with a quinolone‐resistance phenotype was examined for common virulence genes encoded in diarrhea‐ genic and extra‐intestinal pathogenic E. coli by a specific E. coli microarray. Results: Female children were the group most affected by UTIs, which were mainly community‐acquired. Resistance to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and ampicillin–sulbactam was most prevalent. A frequent occurrence of resistance toward ciprofloxacin (47.3%), levofloxacin (43.6%) and cephalosporins (27.6%) was observed. In addition, 63% of the strains were multidrug‐resistant (MDR). Almost all the fluoroquinolone (FQ)‐resistant strains showed MDR‐ phenotype. Isolates from male patients were associated to FQ‐resistant and MDR‐phenotype. Moreover, hospital‐ acquired infections were correlated to third generation cephalosporin and nitrofurantoin resistance and the presence of kpsMTII gene. Overall, fimH (71.8%) and fyuA (68.2%), had the highest prevalence as virulence genes among isolates. However, the profile of virulence genes displayed a great diversity, which included the presence of genes related to diarrheagenic E. coli. Out of 110 isolates, 25 isolates (22.7%) were positive to qnrA, 23 (20.9%) to qnrB, 7 (6.4%) to qnrS1, 7 (6.4%) to aac(6′)lb‐cr, 5 (4.5%) to qnrD, and 1 (0.9%) to qnrC genes. A total of 12.7% of the isolates harbored blaCTX‐M genes, with blaCTX‐M‐15 being the most prevalent. Conclusions: Urinary tract infection due to E. coli may be difficult to treat empirically due to high resistance to com‐ monly used antibiotics. Continuous surveillance of multidrug resistant organisms and patterns of drug resistance are needed in order to prevent treatment failure and reduce selective pressure. These findings may help choosing more suitable treatments of UTI patients in this region of Mexico. Keywords: Urinary tract infection, Multidrug‐resistant, Fluoroquinolone‐resistant, Plasmid‐mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), CTX‐M

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July 2018
6 Reads

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms: Role in pathogenicity and potential impact for vaccination development.

41. Hathroubi, S., Loera-Muro, A., Guerrero-Barrera, A. L., Tremblay, Y.D.N. and Jacques, M. 2017. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms: Role in pathogenicity and potential impact for vaccination development. Animal Health Research Reviews. Nov 7:1-14. doi: 10.1017/S146625231700010X

Animal Health Research Reviews

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the family Pasteurellaceae. It is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious respiratory disease that is responsible for major economic losses in the global pork industry. The disease may present itself as a chronic or an acute infection characterized by severe pathology, including hemorrhage, fibrinous and necrotic lung lesions, and, in the worst cases, rapid death. A. pleuropneumoniae is transmitted via aerosol route, direct contact with infected pigs, and by the farm environment. Many virulence factors associated with this bacterium are well characterized. However, much less is known about the role of biofilm, a sessile mode of growth that may have a critical impact on A. pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity. Here we review the current knowledge on A. pleuropneumoniae biofilm, factors associated with biofilm formation and dispersion, and the impact of biofilm on the pathogenesis A. pleuropneumoniae. We also provide an overview of current vaccination strategies against A. pleuropneumoniae and consider the possible role of biofilms vaccines for controlling the disease.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/animal-health-research-reviews/article/actinobacillus-pleuropneumoniae-biofilms-role-in-pathogenicity-and-potential-impact-for-vaccination-development/CF9D6677C20AB6CD57A6DC5EF50CA0C0

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June 2018
2 Reads

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms: Role in pathogenicity and potential impact for vaccination development.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 Jun 7;19(1):17-30. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

Groupe de recherche sur la maladies infectieuses en production animale,Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire,Université de Montréal,St-Hyacinthe, QC,Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S146625231700010XDOI Listing
June 2018
26 Reads
2 Citations

Effect of plant growth on Pb and Zn geoaccumulation in 300-year-old mine tailings of Zacatecas, México

Environ Earth Sci (2018) 77: 386.

Environmental Earth Sciences

Concentrations of Pb and Zn, plant uptake of these metals, the influence of the plants’ growth on the physicochemical properties and metal concentrations in the tailings of an abandoned 300-year-old mine tailing dam in Zacatecas, Mexico were investigated. Tailings were found to be heavily contaminated, with average levels of 2621 ± 53 and 3827 ± 83 mg/kg for Pb and Zn, respectively (maximum concentrations of 8466 ± 116 and 12,475 ± 324 mg/kg, respectively), exceeding international standards. Though physico-chemical conditions (pH, conductivity, redox potential, moisture, organic matter, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium nitrogen, total nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfates) do not favor the development of vegetation, some plants have adapted to these adverse conditions. Moreover, there was a significant reduction of Pb and Zn concentration in the rhizosphere (between 10–78% for Pb and 18–62% for Zn, depending on plant species). Sporobolus airoides showed average biomass concentrations of 173 ± 2 and 313 ± 6 mg/kg, for Pb and Zn, respectively; which implies a risk for mobility and possible incorporation into the food chain. Barcleyanthus salicifolius, Asclepsias linaria and Cortaderia selloana on the other hand, showed average biomass concentrations of 28 ± 3 and 121 ± 5 mg/kg of Pb and Zn, respectively, thus representing a lower biomagnification risk. The effect of these plants to reduce metal concentrations in the rhizosphere, improve physico-chemical conditions in metal polluted substrates, but with limited metal accumulation in biomass, suggests that they can be evaluated for use in stabilizing metal polluted tailings.

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May 2018
4 Reads

Human ameloblastin labeling in fetuses

Wulfenia. 25 (2): 170-188

Wulfenia

Human teeth enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, is produced at embryo development during amelogenesis. Its lack of regeneration after the teeth eruption and its destruction susceptibility turn it as a good subject of study. Ameloblastin an abundant, phosphorylated, proline/glutamine-rich protein, secreted during enamel formation is a structural matrix component that participates on the maintaining of prismatic structure of the enamel crystals. It also, has been involved in the animal amelogenesis as adhesion protein, expressed at pre-secretory stage that diminishes in the secretory stage. However its function and distribution in human being remains unclear. In order to contribute to the understanding of ameloblastin distribution during amelogenesis, the present study explores its location in the different structures on human fetal tooth by immunohistochemical labeling using a polyclonal antibody against ameloblastin in 5μm human jaws fetuses’ sections. Thus, at pre-secretory stage ameloblastin was detected at the apical membrane and also at basal end of the ameloblast, as well as in the stellate reticulum. At the secretory stage is located at the secretory ameloblast, enamel, and dentin and in the odontoblasts. This ameloblastin location can be related with the enamel crystals organization in both pre-secretory and secretory stages.

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February 2018
14 Reads

Granulomatous Natural Swine Pleuroneumonia in Farms of Aguascalientes, Mexico. EC Microbiology

EC Microbiology. 21017. 10.2:72-83

EC Microbiology

Through a random sampling made in 60 pigs slaughtered in San Francisco de los Romo, Aguascalientes, Mexico, lesions character- istic of pleuropneumonia was found in 40 animals (66.6 %). From samples of lung tissue and necrotic lesions fribrin-hemorrhagic, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (AP) was isolated and biochemically characterize in 55% (22 pigs) of affected animals. In all cases the presence of AP was confirmed by PCR using gene-specific primer of the Apx toxin IV. Three samples from healthy animals were used as negative control. Sections of 4 um stained with H-E from injured lungs showed haemorrhagic lesions, thickening of alveolar septa and granulomes associated with bronchi and bronchioles. Through Masson trichromic and Wilder staining (specific for reticu- lar fibers, type III collagen), was showed light to moderate fibrosis in the injured tissue. Using PAS staining was observed disruption of alveolar septa and the presence of the pathogen. Immunolocalization of AP was additionally performed using immunohistochem- istry technique with a polyclonal antibody, prepared from a total protein extract of AP biotype 1 strain 4074. Finally, composition of granulomes was determined in these lesions by immunohistochemical technique using specific antibodies. Granulomes observed were not tuberculous and presenten macrophages, T cells, activated B cells and epithelioid cells, gigant cells are rare, but not neutrophils or calcium precipitation

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July 2017
3 Reads

Expression of Enamel Proteins in Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum and Golgi Complex in Human Dental Germs

Int. J. Morphol., 35(2) : 435-441, 2017.

International Journal of Morphology

Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in the body. The organic matrix configuration is provided by the main proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelysin (MMP20), an enzyme that helps to shape the matrix. The aim of this study was to determine by histochemistry the expression of amelogenin and enamelysin through the rough endoplasmic reticulum in the late stages of ame logenesis, and its expression in the Complexus golgiensis (Golgi complex / Golgi apparatus) in the early stages in human fetuses. In early stages a colocalization of both proteins inside the Golgi apparatus was found, being more evident the relationship between Golgi and amelogenin (99.92 %). In the late stage, a colocalization of both proteins and rugged endoplasmic reticulum was found. With enamelysin being more evident in relation with rough endoplasmic reticulum (99.95 %). Our findings demonstrated the presence of amelogenin and enamelysin in odontoblast and ameloblast. However, the presence of these two proteins in odontoblast remains unknown.

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June 2017
8 Reads

Auxotrophic Actinobacillus pleurpneumoniae grows in multispecies biofilms without the need for nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) supplementation.

36. Loera-Muro, A., Jacques, M., Avelar-González, F. J., Labrie, J., Tremblay, Y.D.N., Oropeza-Navarro, R. and Guerrero-Barrera, A. L. 2016. Auxotrophic Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae grows in multispecies biofilms without the need for nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) supplementation. BMC. M

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, which causes important worldwide economic losses in the swine industry. Several respiratory tract infections are associated with biofilm formation, and A. pleuropneumoniae has the ability to form biofilms in vitro. Biofilms are structured communities of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced polymer matrix that are attached to an abiotic or biotic surface. Virtually all bacteria can grow as a biofilm, and multi-species biofilms are the most common form of microbial growth in nature. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form multi-species biofilms with other bacteria frequently founded in pig farms, in the absence of pyridine compounds (nicotinamide mononucleotide [NMN], nicotinamide riboside [NR] or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD]) that are essential for the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae.

https://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12866-016-0742-3

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June 2017
7 Reads

Expresión de tuftelina en gérmenes dentales humanos

Int. J. Morphol., 35(1):293-298, 2017

International Journal of Morphology

La tuftelina es una proteína secretada en la matriz adamantina en desarrollo durante la formación del esmalte. Su función continúa sin esclarecerse, aunque se presume que juega un papel importante en la biomineralización de esmalte y dentina , así como en el desarrollo del órgano dental. Con el presente estudio se identificó su localización en las diferentes estructuras de gérmenes dentales de fetos humanos, conforme a los resultados se observó su expresión en el estadio pre-secretor observándose en el cito plasma de los ameloblastos, retículo estrellado, papila dental, así como en el estrato intermedio; en el secretor se identificó principal mente en la unión amelodentinaria, y en la superficie externa del esmalte, observando una marcada expresión de la proteína en la porción ba sal del proceso odontoblástico, pero no en la matriz extracelular de la dentina. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede conside rar que su expresión se presenta tanto en la amelogénesis, como en la odontogénesis en tejidos sin mineralizar

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March 2017
9 Reads

Evaluation of Environmental Risk of Metal Contaminated Soils and Sediments Near Mining Sites in Aguascalientes, Mexico.

Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 2016 Aug 13;97(2):216-24. Epub 2016 May 13.

Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Avenida Universidad #940, Aguascalientes, 20231, Aguascalientes, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00128-016-1820-9DOI Listing
August 2016
10 Reads
1.255 Impact Factor

F-actin distribution changes provoked by Acetaminophen in the proximal tubule in kidney of adult male rat.

2016 , 4, 39 -45

Microscopy Research

Acetaminophen is a drug used to treat many conditions as headache, muscle aches, arthritis, backache, toothache, and fever between others, but collateral effects of this drug are not well known yet. Here is tested its effect on proximal tubule epithelium. Acetaminophen (APAP) at doses of 200, 500, 1000 and 1500 mg/Kg i.p. caused cell damage and changes in F -actin distribution in the proximal tubule of male Wistar rats. After 48 hours of treatment, the proximal tubule epithelium showed tumefaction and necrosis. Dose of 200 mg/kg decreased the F-actin and was observed a structure in patches in the basal cytoplasm of epithelial cells of the proximal tubule. This effect was increased depending on the administered dose. Dose of 1000 mg/kg produced the highest histological damage and changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Results of this study suggested that nephrotoxic damage produced by high doses of APAP included breakdown of cytoskeleton in proximal tubule epithelium.

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July 2016
6 Reads

Auxotrophic Actinobacillus pleurpneumoniae grows in multispecies biofilms without the need for nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) supplementation.

BMC Microbiol 2016 06 27;16(1):128. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Ags., Mexico, 20131.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12866-016-0742-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924255PMC
June 2016
15 Reads
3 Citations
2.730 Impact Factor

Unilateral Impact of Altered Loading by Changing Teeth Height on the TMJ Fibrocartilage: Disc and Condyle of Wistar Rats

Microscopy Research Vol.4 No.2, April 2016

Microscopy Research

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is sensitive to loading and mechanical stress that provokes morphological changes produced by the impact in the occlusal plane. Here, this impact is evaluated in TMJ articular disc and articular cartilage using an in vivo model of unilateral occlusal plane impact and by analysis of serial tissue sections stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin (H-E) or with Masson trichrome technique. Thus, six groups of 5 Wistar rats (200 - 250 g) are subjected to biomechanical dental stimulation by placing unilateral resin occlusal interference, or unilateral tooth wear made by upper left molars artificial mechanical devastation (1 control and 2 experimental groups for each treatment). Each treatment is evaluated two times at 1 and 15 days post-treatment. By H-E staining, control groups show chondrocytes arrangement as several cord cell groups in comparison with the experimental groups, which show an arrangement in one cord cell along of articular disc. However, this yields no significant difference (p < 0.05) in cell number between control and experimental groups. In contrast, in articular cartilage chondrocytes are random distributed along the superficial zone in control groups, while in experimental groups cell-free regions are observed in superficial zone. An image Blue hue analysis for trichrome stain is performed to quantify collagen; this shows a significant collagen decrease (p < 0.05) in almost all experimental groups compared with the controls. A degenerative process biomechanically induced by unilateral occlusal plane modification, causes cell and tissue changes on the TMJ structures that remain the degenerative changes observed in early osteoarthritis.

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April 2016
7 Reads

Estudio Morfométrico de la Posición Cráneo-Cervical en Pacientes con Clases Esqueletales II y III

Int. J. Morphol., 33(2):415-419, 2015

International Journal of Morphology

La posición cráneo-cervical representa un factor importante en el diagnostico morfológico de discrepancias óseas, articulares y miofuncionales. En base a las diversas clases esqueletales se observan diferencias en la ubicación de puntos craneométricos que resultan determinantes en el diagnóstico del equilibrio ortostático del cráneo con la porción cervical de la columna vertebral. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar y comparar la posición cráneo-cervical en clases esqueletales II y III. Se recolectaron 114 radiografías laterales de cráneo, se analizaron y compararon los puntos craneométricos por medio de cefalometría con la Técnica de Rocabado. Los resultados muestran diferencias estadísticamente significativas en las posiciones craneales para cada clase esquelética tanto en distancias como rotación entre cráneo y porción cervical de la columna vertebral.

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August 2015
8 Reads

Waterborne pathogens: detection methods and challenges.

Pathogens 2015 May 21;4(2):307-34. Epub 2015 May 21.

Laboratorio de Biología Celular y Tisular, Departamento de Morfología, Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes 20131, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pathogens4020307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4493476PMC
May 2015
11 Reads
17 Citations

Waterborne pathogens: detection methods and challenges.

Pathogens 2015, 4(2), 307-334

Pathogens

Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems' infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health.

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May 2015
13 Reads

Bioflocks structure from enriched lab-scale stabilization ponds used to remove high chromium concentrations

Int J Curr Microbiol App Sci 4(1):625-634.

International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences 2319-7706

Architecture of bioflocks from labscale anoxic stabilization ponds enriched with activated sludge, used to remove efficiently high concentrations of chromium VI, until 153 mg/l with near 99% of removal efficiency, was determined by scanning electronic microscopy. This flocculated biomass showed a biofilm-like architecture formed by cylindrical towers and scattered structures on the surface showing liquid channels inside the bioflock, characteristic of biofilm architecture, but they were not attached to any inert surface. Before chromium treatment bioflocks had a gram negative: gram positive bacteria proportion of 50: 50%. After chromium treatment these proportion changes to 70: 30%, respectively. The viability of flocculated biomass before and after chromium treatment was almost 100%, determined by Live/Dead Bactlight Kit (Molecular Probes). Before chromium treatment, bioflocks were characterized and the bacteria present were isolated, biochemically characterized and sequenced using rRNA, these bacteria were Aeromonas hydrophila AKR1, Curtobacterium sp Fek 20, Staphylococcus saprophyticus OTUC3, Bacillus sp By130 (A) Ydz-ds, Citrobacter sp I101-10, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli UMN 026, Morganella morganii BH-16, Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH78578, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and Enterobacter sp YRL01. After chromium treatment only were found Escherichia coli UMN 026, Acinetobacter sp TPR 15 and Morganella morganii BH-16. These results show a selection of chromium resistant species.

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January 2015
7 Reads

A world Under Stress, Molecular Response to Adverse Conditions

Int J Curr Res Acad Rev 3(1): 85-100

International Journal of Current Research and Academic Reviews 2347-3215

Cells are able to respond to stress stimuli through the expression of proteins that compensate for or seek to return the cell to its functional status. Among the most studied proteins in relation to stress are heat shock proteins (HSPs) or chaperones; these proteins were originally discovered as induced proteins that facilitate proper folding of proteins with non-native conformations. HSPs are a set of highly conserved proteins that are present in all types of cells, from microbes to mammals. In bacteria, chaperones and proteases regulate cell activity under stress conditions. In echinoderms, aquatic invertebrates and fish stress proteins response mechanisms are associated with the expression of chaperones that protect them of temperature changes and oxidative stress. In mammalian cells, there is the expression of anti-stress mechanisms that are also associated with certain physiological conditions such as mitosis and maintaining the cell under homeostatic conditions. In plants, one of the conditions most studied is the response to osmotic stress, leading to the synthesis of membrane transporter systems that compensate the water flow and at the same time, overexpressing intracellular mechanisms associated with enzymes that contribute to decrease the production of free oxygen radicals. In general, cells of all organisms are capable of initiating regulatory mechanisms that contribute a reduction in cell injury that can result in loss of homeostasis. When this mechanisms decline because aging or faulty metabolism, disease occur. This finding allows to use them as a terapheutic alternative for aging diseases as Alzhaimer and cancer between others.

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January 2015
6 Reads

Antimicrobial resistance: the role of aquatic environments

Int J Curr Res Acad Rev 2(7):231-246

International Journal of Current Research and Academic Reviews 2347-3215

Antimicrobial resistance is a major concern worldwide. Antibiotics are one of the most used drugs in humans and animals. The intensive use of antimicrobial agents is one of the main factors for the generation of resistant bacteria. Infections with resistant organisms and the emergence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, represents an urgent global challenge since increases the incidence of morbidity and mortality and decreases the effectiveness of infectious diseases treatments. Many of the encoding antimicrobial resistant genes from human pathogens have originated in natural environments. Anthropogenic activities on aquatic environments, sediments and soils, such as hospital, pharmaceuticals and municipals discharges into rivers and lakes increase the generation of new resistance genes and the spread of resistant bacteria in the environment as well as in public health. This highlights the importance of the environment as a reservoir of resistance genes and dispersal vector. It is necessary to take measures to reduce the introduction and spread of resistant bacteria and its determinants in the environment, which could contain diverse chemicals, antibiotic residues or quaternary ammonium compounds. These measures include the management of wastewater treatment.

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December 2014
8 Reads

Cell culture: History, Development and Prospects

Int J Curr Res Acad Rev 2(12):188-200.

International Journal of Current Research and Academic Reviews 2347-3215

Since its inception, the animal cell culture in the twentieth century is related to its usefulness in research. Early methods such as Harrison culture of the inverted drop, Carrel’s and Lindbergh’s innovations made with the introduction of the use of the infusion pump, the culture of HeLa cells and vaccine design using animal cell cultures are approach which revolutioned the implementation and study of the cell culture. One of the important steps in this technique is the selection of the culture media, which provides the physical and chemical conditions close to those occurring in the natural environment for cell growth, which are crucial for the adhesion, proliferation and cell survival in vitro. In this review, the essential aspects that define this technique are shown, offering a historical overview of the most relevant events and the current prospect in the development of the cell culture, that have been enabled the progress in both, basic and applied research. [less]

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December 2014
44 Reads

CONCENTRATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN DENTAL ENAMEL USING THE ENERGY-DISPERSIVE X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY TECHNIQUE

European Scientific Journal 10(18):1857-7881.

European Scientifican Journal 1857 – 7881

The aims of this study were to determine the concentration and identify the distribution of existent trace elements in dental enamel from whole sections of dental organs. In this study the distribution of trace elements was analyzed considering three main areas: the surfaces near the dentin-enamel junction and the external and intermediate surfaces. Seventeen location points were studied in the enamel tissue through scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical elements were performed by spectral dispersive X-ray energy. The results of the present study indicate the presence of thirteen trace elements (Al, Sn, Sb, I, Si, Yb, Ba, K, Br, Sr, Sc, In, S), their distribution and concentration models are presented here and different anatomical distributions in the crown of the dental organ are shown. In conclusion, with the energy dispersive spectral X-ray analysis, different element distributions and concentrations of trace elements were identified in the thickness of the dental enamel.

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July 2014
6 Reads

Porcine Respiratory Pathogens in Swine Farms Environment in Mexico

Open J Animal Sci 4:196-205.

Open Journal of Animal Sciences

Respiratory pathogens are the main health problem in the swine industry worldwide. These pathogens are transmitted by direct contact between animals or by aerosols and however are not well known yet, if the environment works as its reservoir, inoculum and/or dispersion medium. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of respiratory pathogens in environmental samples from swine farms in Aguascalientes, Mexico, through of PCR and RT-PCR techniques. The bacteria Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida were found viable in samples from water, food, soil and air. Streptococcus suis was found in a viable state in water samples. Haemophilus parasuis, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus and Swine Influenza virus (H1N1 and H3N2) were detected in drinking water samples. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were not detected in environmental samples. These results suggest that the environment of the farms acts as a reservoir, inoculum and/or vehicle of dispersion for these pathogens except for M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2.

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July 2014
7 Reads

Cholinergic neuromuscular junctions in Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata (Rotifera: Monogononta)

Journal of Coastal Life Medicine 2(5):376-381. DOI: 10.12980/JCLM.2.201414J3

Journal of Coastal Life Medicine 2309-5288

Objective: To identify the presence of joint muscular and cholinergic systems in two freshwater rotifer species: Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata. Methods: Staining the muscle actin fibers with phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye, and acetylcholine with Amplex Red Acetylcholine/Acetylcholinesterase Assay Kit, and then using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Results: The musculature of B. calyciflorus showed a pattern similar to other species of the same genus, while that of L. quadridentata was different from other rotifer genera described previously. The cholinergic system was determined by co-localization of both muscles and acetylcholine labels in the whole rotifer, suggesting the presence of neuromuscular junctions. Conclusion: The distribution pattern of muscular and acetylcholine systems showed considerable differences between the two species that might be related to different adaptations to particular ecological niches. The confirmation of a cholinergic system in rotifers contributes to the development of potential neuro-pharmacological and toxicological studies using rotifers as model organism.

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May 2014
7 Reads

Presence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli in the San Pedro River located in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

Ramírez-Castillo, F. Y., Avelar-González, F. J., Garneau P., Márquez-Díaz, F., Guerrero-Barrera, A. L. Presence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli in the San Pedro River located in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico. Frontiers in Microbiology. Antimicrobials, Resistance and C

Frontiers in Microbiology

Contamination of surface waters in developing countries is a great concern. Treated and untreated wastewaters have been discharged into rivers and streams, leading to possible waterborne infection outbreaks and may represent a significant dissemination mechanism of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, the water quality of San Pedro River, the main river and pluvial collector of the Aguascalientes State, Mexico was assessed. Thirty sample locations were tested throughout the River. The main physicochemical parameters of water were evaluated. Results showed high levels of fecal pollution as well as inorganic and organic matter abundant enough to support the heterotrophic growth of microorganisms. These results indicate poor water quality in samples from different locations. One hundred and fifty Escherichia coli were collected and screened by PCR for several virulence genes. Isolates were classified as either pathogenic (n = 91) or commensal (n = 59). The disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility to 13 antibiotics. Fifty-two percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent and 30.6% were multi-resistant. Eighteen E. coli strains were quinolone resistant of which 16 were multi-resistant. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes were detected in 12 isolates. Mutations at the Ser-83→Leu and/or Asp-87→Asn in the gyrA gene were detected as well as mutations at the Ser-80→Ile in parC. An E. coli microarray (Maxivirulence V 3.1) was used to characterize the virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes profiles of the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Antimicrobial resistance genes such as blaTEM, sulI, sulII, dhfrIX, aph3 (strA), and tet (B) as well as integrons were found in fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance E. coli strains. The presence of potential pathogenic E. coli and antibiotic resistance in San Pedro River such as FQ resistant E. coli could pose a potential threat to human and animal health.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00147/full

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June 2013
3 Reads

Presence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli in the San Pedro River located in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

Front Microbiol 2013 17;4:147. Epub 2013 Jun 17.

Laboratorio de Biología Celular y Tisular, Departamento de Morfología, Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes Aguascalientes, México.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683621PMC
June 2013
10 Reads
9 Citations
3.941 Impact Factor

Presence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Streptococcus suis, Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Haemophilus parasuis and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in upper respiratory tract of swine in farms from Aguascalientes, Mexico

Open J Animal Sci 3(2):132-137

Open Journal of Animal Sciences

ABSTRACT Respiratory diseases are one of the most im-portant health problems in pig herds. The por-cine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is the term used to describe pneumonic diseases caused by multiple infectious agents that pro-voke weight loss in animals or death. In the PRDC multiple pathogens (bacteria and/or vi-ruses) work in combination to induce this res-piratory disease. Within this complex, Actino-bacillus pleuropneumoniae, Streptococcus suis, Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchisep-tica, Haemophilus parasuis and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are the main bacterial patho-gens involved in great economic losses to the swine industry. The aim of this work was to es-timate the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, P. multocida, B. bronchiseptica, H. para-suis and M. hyopneumoniae in the upper respi-ratory tract of pigs in representative swine farms in Aguascalientes, Mexico, using PCR technique. The study was performed in 14 swine farms. We obtained a total of 212 nasal swabs. Near 20% of samples were positive for A. pleuropneumoniae (located in the 79% of farms); 17% were positive for S. suis (in 86% of farms), of these, 3% were S. suis serovar 2; 30% were positive for H. parasuis (93% of farms); 23% of the samples to P. multo-cida (in 79% of farms); and 19% to M. hyop-neumoniae (in 64% of farms). B. bronchiseptica was not detected in this study. The results ob-tained show that bacterial pathogens of PRDC were present in the upper respiratory tract of pigs in all farms studied; therefore, these patho-gens are widely disseminated in pig farms of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

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May 2013
6 Reads

Detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in drinking water from pig farms.

Microbiology 2013 Mar 24;159(Pt 3):536-44. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Ags., C. P. 20131, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.057992-0DOI Listing
March 2013
9 Reads
3 Citations
2.560 Impact Factor

Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detected by modified fluorescent in situ hybridization in lymph nodes of clinical samples.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2012 Jan 12;6(1):58-66. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, México.

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January 2012
21 Reads
2 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

Design of a controlled release system of OP-1 and TGF-β1 based in microparticles of sodium alginate and release characterization by HPLC-UV.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2011 Dec 20;47(10):681-8. Epub 2011 Oct 20.

Laboratorio de Biología Celular y Tisular, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Av. Universidad 940, Aguascalientes, 20131, Aguascalientes, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-011-9459-7DOI Listing
December 2011
11 Reads
1 Citation
1.150 Impact Factor

Amelogenin and enamelysin localization in human dental germs.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2011 Jun 21;47(5-6):355-60. Epub 2011 Apr 21.

Centro de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Av. Universidad 940, C. U. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-011-9407-6DOI Listing
June 2011
15 Reads
1.150 Impact Factor

Establishment and characterization of porcine aortic endothelial cell cultures with prolonged replicative lifespan by a non-enzymatic method.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2009 Jan-Feb;45(1-2):15-8. Epub 2008 Oct 2.

Basic Sciences Center, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, México.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-008-9146-5DOI Listing
October 2009
6 Reads
2 Citations
1.150 Impact Factor

Pathogenic and opportunistic gram-negative bacteria in soil, leachate and air in San Nicolás landfill at Aguascalientes, Mexico.

Rev Latinoam Microbiol 2007 Jan-Jun;49(1-2):25-30

Departamento de Biología, Centro C. Básicas, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes.

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October 2008
13 Reads
2 Citations

Labscale anoxic stabilization ponds operated under high organic loads: long term effect of enrichment with activated sludge.

Environ Technol 2007 Jun;28(6):693-9

Departamento de Fisiología y Farmacología, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Av. Universidad 940, CP 20100, Aguascalientes, Ags., Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593332808618829DOI Listing
June 2007
8 Reads
1.560 Impact Factor

Treatment of wastewater containing high phenol concentrations using stabilisation ponds enriched with activated sludge.

Water Sci Technol 2005 ;51(12):257-60

Departamento de Fisiología y Farmacología, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Av. Universidad 940, CP 20100, Aguascalientes, Ags., Mexico.

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December 2005
9 Reads
1.110 Impact Factor

Identification and purification of actin from the subpellicular network of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

Int J Parasitol 2005 Jul;35(8):883-94

Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del IPN. Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional No 2508. Col. Sn Pedro Zacatenco, Del. Gustavo A. Madero., México.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2005.03.016DOI Listing
July 2005
13 Reads
3 Citations
3.872 Impact Factor

Adherence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to swine-lung collagen.

Microbiology 2004 Jul;150(Pt 7):2391-400

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Ap. 14-740, Mexico, DF 07000, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.27053-0DOI Listing
July 2004
5 Reads
2 Citations
2.560 Impact Factor

Entamoeba histolytica: transferrin binding proteins.

Exp Parasitol 2001 Nov;99(3):132-40

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., México, D.F., México.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/expr.2001.4647DOI Listing
November 2001
6 Reads
5 Citations
1.860 Impact Factor

The cytoskeleton in prokaryotes

Recent Res. Devel. Microbiology. 5:139-169.

Recent Res. Devel. Microbiology

The ability of eukaryotic cells to change their shape and to carry out a variety of coordinated and directed movements, depends on a complex network of protein filaments that extend throughout the cytoplasm known as cytoskeleton. Although the cytoskeleton has a central role in most cellular processes, its function in eukaryotes is as yet not fully understood and the register of its components is not yet complete. The main reason for this is the constant discovery of novel cytoskeletal proteins and their functional characterization, which is being greatly enhanced by genome sequencing projects, bioinformatics and the association of functional data with gene products. All this information is transforming our knowledge of the cytoskeleton and the way we approach its study. In prokaryotes there is still controversy over the existence of a cytoskeleton. But biochemical, immunological, genetic and structural evidence, suggests that prokaryotes do indeed have proteins which are analogous to those that form microfilaments and microtubules in eukaryotes, and that these prokaryotic proteins might form cytoskeletal-like structures with similar functions to those found in eukaryotes.

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January 2001
10 Reads

A 24 Kda cloned zinc metalloprotease form Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro

Can. J. Vet. Res. 64:88-95

Can. J. Vet. Res.

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease.

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April 2000
6 Reads

A 24-kDa cloned zinc metalloprotease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro.

García-Cuéllar, C., Tenorio, V., Reyes, J., Durán, M. J., Negrete, E., Guerrero, A. L. & De la Garza, M. 2000. A 24 Kda cloned zinc metalloprotease form Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro Can. J. Vet. Res. 64:88-95. PMCID: PMC1189590

Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1189590/

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March 2000
3 Reads

Actin-related proteins in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and their interactions with actin-binding proteins.

Microbiology 1999 Nov;145 ( Pt 11):3235-44

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, México, DF, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/00221287-145-11-3235DOI Listing
November 1999
8 Reads
1 Citation
2.560 Impact Factor

Actin-related proteins in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and their interactions with actin-binding proteins.

Microbiology 145: 3235- 3244

Microbiology

A group of prokaryotic actin-related proteins (PARP) with an Mr of 43000 was detected in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. These proteins were enriched by a depolymerization/polymerization cycle, under similar conditions to those used to polymerize muscle actin, and purified by affinity chromatography on a DNase I-Sepharose column. Three isoforms of A. pleuropneumoniae PARP (Ap-PARP) with pI values of 5.8, 6.15 and 6.2 were detected. Ap-PARP were recognized by four different anti-actin antibodies (one anti-muscle and three anti-cytoplasmic isoforms). Ap-PARP were also recognized by antibodies against Anabaena variabilis PARP (Av-PARP) and against actin-binding proteins such as alpha-actinin and spectrin, and also by a monoclonal antibody against heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70). Specific binding of phalloidin to Ap-PARP was detected both in permeabilized cells and in vitro. Purified Ap-PARP can polymerize under similar conditions to those required for skeletal muscle actin polymerization and the filaments formed appear to be decorated with myosin subfragment-1(S1) as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The amino acid composition of Ap-PARP revealed more similarities to muscle gamma-actin and the cytoplasmic beta-actin isoform than to eukaryotic actin-related proteins.

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November 1999
8 Reads

Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

Can J Vet Res 1998 Jul;62(3):183-90

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, México D.F., Mexico.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1189474PMC
July 1998
7 Reads
6 Citations
1.022 Impact Factor

Kdp-like system in Salmonella typhimurium LT-2.

Rev Latinoam Microbiol 1995 Jul-Sep;37(3):227-36

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico.

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December 1996
8 Reads
1 Citation

Actin-related proteins in Anabaena spp. and Escherichia coli.

Microbiology 1996 May;142 ( Pt 5):1133-40

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, México, DF, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/13500872-142-5-1133DOI Listing
May 1996
4 Reads
6 Citations
2.560 Impact Factor