Publications by authors named "Allen R Chauvenet"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma mimicking a peritonsillar abscess.

W V Med J 2014 Sep-Oct;110(5):12-4

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue malignancy seen in childhood and frequently occurs in the head and neck region. Pediatric head and neck RMS is often misdiagnosed as common benign conditions. Here we describe an embryonal RMS that presented as a peritonsillar abscess (PTA). Due to an incorrect initial diagnosis and lack of imaging, the patient received unnecessary medical therapy and diagnosis of RMS was delayed.
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February 2015

In reply.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2014 Aug;36(6):501-2

*Department of Neurology, University at Buffalo School of Medicine §Department of Pediatrics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY †Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Holtz Children's Hospital, Miami, FL ‡Department of Radiological Sciences St Jude Children's Research Hospital Memphis, TN ∥Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Health Science Center, Augusta, GA ¶Department of Pediatrics, West Virginia University Health Science Center Charleston, WV.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000000145DOI Listing
August 2014

Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis.

SAGE Open Med 2014 16;2:2050312114547093. Epub 2014 Aug 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Charleston Area Medical Center, West Virginia University, Charleston, WV, USA.

Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis.

Study Design: Charts of all (N = 30) patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30.

Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care). All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history.

Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050312114547093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4607200PMC
January 2016

Neurocognitive and neuroradiologic central nervous system late effects in children treated on Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) P9605 (standard risk) and P9201 (lesser risk) acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols (ACCL0131): a methotrexate consequence? A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2014 Jan;36(1):8-15

*Department of Neurology, University at Buffalo School of Medicine ∥Department of Pediatrics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY †Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Holtz Children's Hospital, Miami, FL ‡Statistics and Data Center, Children's Oncology Group, Monrovia, CA §Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN ¶Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Health Science Center, Augusta, GA #Department of Pediatrics, West Virginia University Health Science Center, Charleston, WV.

Concerns about long-term methotrexate (MTX) neurotoxicity in the 1990s led to modifications in intrathecal (IT) therapy, leucovorin rescue, and frequency of systemic MTX administration in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this study, neurocognitive outcomes and neuroradiologic evidence of leukoencephalopathy were compared in children treated with intense central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy (P9605) versus those receiving fewer CNS-directed treatment days during intensive consolidation (P9201). A total of 66 children from 16 Pediatric Oncology Group institutions with "standard-risk" acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1.00 to 9.99 years at diagnosis, without evidence of CNS leukemia at diagnosis were enrolled on ACCL0131: 28 from P9201 and 38 from P9605. Magnetic resonance imaging scans and standard neuropsychological tests were performed ≥2.6 years after the end of treatment. Significantly more P9605 patients developed leukoencephalopathy compared with P9201 patients (68%, 95% confidence interval 49%-83% vs. 22%, 95% confidence interval 5%-44%; P=0.001) identified as late as 7.7 years after the end of treatment. Overall, 40% of patients scored <85 on either Verbal or Performance IQ. Children on both studies had significant attention problems, but P9605 children scored below average on more neurocognitive measures than those treated on P9201 (82%, 14/17 measures vs. 24%, 4/17 measures). This supports ongoing concerns about intensive MTX exposure as a major contributor to CNS late effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000000000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465396PMC
January 2014

Repeating blood cultures in neutropenic children with persistent fevers when the initial blood culture is negative.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014 Feb 30;61(2):194. Epub 2013 Oct 30.

Department of Pediatrics, Charleston Area Medical Center, West Virginia University-Charleston, Charleston, West Virginia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.24834DOI Listing
February 2014

ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Hodgkin's lymphoma: favorable prognosis stage I and II.

J Am Coll Radiol 2008 Oct;5(10):1054-66

The Universityof Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The treatment for favorable-prognosis stage I and II Hodgkin's lymphoma has evolved over the past several years. Studies have attempted to reduce long-term treatment-related side effects, such as second malignancies and cardiac toxicity, through reduced chemotherapy or reduced radiotherapy. Randomized trials have compared radiation therapy alone with combined-modality therapy (chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiotherapy). Recent and ongoing trials have evaluated the optimal regimen and number of cycles of chemotherapy and the optimal radiotherapy dose and field size as part of combined-modality therapy, as well as the elimination of radiation therapy. Combined-modality therapy represents the current standard of care for most patients with favorable-prognosis early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Chemotherapy alone could also be an option for selected patients who are at low risk for relapse and high risk for late effects from radiotherapy. This article reviews recent and ongoing studies on treatment for favorable-prognosis early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Representative clinical cases are presented, with treatment recommendations from an expert panel of radiation oncologists and medical oncologists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2008.06.016DOI Listing
October 2008

Antimetabolite therapy for lesser-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood: a report from Children's Oncology Group Study P9201.

Blood 2007 Aug 18;110(4):1105-11. Epub 2007 Apr 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) protocol 9201 enrolled children with lesser-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) defined by age (1-9), white blood cell count (WBC) less than 50 x 10(9)/L (50,000/microL), DNA findings of trisomies 4 and 10 (or DNA index > 1.16), and lack of overt central nervous system (CNS) leukemia. After vincristine, prednisone, and asparaginase induction, 650 of 653 eligible patients attained remission (3 induction deaths) and received 6 courses of intravenous methotrexate (1 g/m(2)) with daily mercaptopurine. Weekly intramuscular methotrexate was added during maintenance; pulses of vincristine and prednisone were administered with periodic intrathecal chemotherapy. Treatment duration was 2.5 years. No alkylators, epipodophylotoxins, anthracyclines, or radiation were given. The 6-year event-free survival (EFS) was 86.6% with overall survival (OS) of 97.2%. Patients with less than 5% marrow blasts on induction day 15 had superior EFS. A difference not reaching conventional statistical significance (P = .068) was noted for superior outcomes in patients with trisomies of chromosomes 4 and 10 versus those lacking double trisomies. Sex, ethnicity, CNS status, and WBC were not predictive. This indicates the great majority of children with lesser-risk B-lineage ALL are curable without agents with substantial late effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2006-12-061689DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1939894PMC
August 2007

POG 8625: a randomized trial comparing chemotherapy with chemoradiotherapy for children and adolescents with Stages I, IIA, IIIA1 Hodgkin Disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2006 Jun;28(6):362-8

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103, USA.

To determine if 6 courses of chemotherapy alone could achieve the same or better outcome than 4 courses of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy (chemoradiotherapy) in pediatric and adolescent patients with Hodgkin disease. Children < or =21 years old with biopsy-proven, pathologically staged I, IIA, or IIIA1 Hodgkin disease were randomly assigned 6 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (treatment 1) or 4 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine +2550 cGy involved-field radiotherapy (treatment 2). The complete response rate was 89%, with a complete response and partial response rate of 99.4%. There was no statistically significant difference in event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival between arms. The EFS for those who achieved an early complete response was significantly higher than for those who did not. For pediatric patients with asymptomatic low-stage and intermediate-stage Hodgkin disease, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy both resulted in 3-year EFS of approximately 90% and statistically indistinguishable 8-year EFS and overall survival, without significant long-term toxicity. Early response to therapy was associated with higher EFS, a concept that has led to the Children's Oncology Group paradigm of response-based risk-adapted therapy for pediatric Hodgkin disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00043426-200606000-00008DOI Listing
June 2006

Diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma in pediatric patients by thoracentesis.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2007 Jul;49(1):90-2

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

The diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma by thoracentesis has been rarely reported in the literature, particularly in children. From 1995 to 2004, we diagnosed six pediatric patients with mature B-cell neoplasms using thoracentesis as the initial diagnostic procedure. The cytology, immunophenotyping, and cytogenetic results of the pleural fluid cells were consistent with mature B-cell malignancies. We conclude that thoracentesis for the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma in children is safe, fast, and accurate. It should be strongly considered as an initial diagnostic procedure for pediatric patients with pleural effusions who are suspected of having B-cell malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.20683DOI Listing
July 2007

APE chemotherapy for children with relapsed Hodgkin disease: a Pediatric Oncology Group trial.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2006 Mar;46(3):320-4

Childrens Oncology Group, Arcadia, CA, USA.

Background: MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) and ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) are effective therapies for Hodgkin disease (HD) that may cause long-term toxicities in children. APE (cytosine arabinoside, cisplatin, etoposide) is a non-cross-resistant regimen with limited toxicities. We evaluated this regimen for patients with recurrent or refractory disease.

Methods: Patients with recurrent Hodgkin disease who were
Results: Thirty-one patients in first (n = 25) or second (n = 6) relapse of Hodgkin disease were eligible and evaluable. APE chemotherapy was well-tolerated, with the major toxicity consisting of short duration, grade 3/4 hematopoietic toxicity. The CR/PR response rate was 68% (42% CR, 26% PR). Allowing subsequent stem cell transplantation in some patients, 4-year EFS and OS were 27% +/- 8% and 49% +/- 9%, with 8-year EFS and OS of 23% +/- 9% and 34% +/- 10%.

Discussion: APE is an efficacious regimen with minimal toxicity. Novel regimens are necessary to: (1) re-induce remission, (2) treat newly diagnosed patients, and (3) augment therapy in patients with slow response to standard regimens. This regimen had minimal toxicity and an excellent response rate that facilitated long term survival, often in conjunction with transplantation. The Children's Oncology Group is using a similar regimen to augment therapy for slow responders on a current Hodgkin disease trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.20563DOI Listing
March 2006

Recent steroid therapy increases severity of varicella infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pediatrics 2005 Oct;116(4):e525-9

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

Objective: The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) continues to be a dangerous pathogen to immunocompromised children. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with intermittent steroid therapy. This study was undertaken to examine the relationship between steroid therapy for ALL and severity of varicella infection.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients who were on Pediatric Oncology Group Protocol 9201 and had a history of varicella infection. Pediatric Oncology Group 9201 is a phase III study for the treatment of children with lesser risk ALL diagnosed between 1992 and 1999. Cases of varicella were coded 1 to 5 on the basis of severity: grade 1 caused minimal to no symptoms, grade 2 caused mild to moderate symptoms that did not require hospitalization, grade 3 caused symptoms severe enough to require hospitalization and intravenous acyclovir, grade 4 caused severe disease that had complications or that required intensive care, and grade 5 resulted in death.

Results: Of 697 enrolled patients, 110 (15.8%) developed primary varicella; 59% of these were male. For analysis, disease grade was dichotomized into nonsevere (grades 1 and 2) and severe (grades 3, 4, and 5). Of the 110 patients, 56 had nonsevere disease; 54 had severe disease, including 2 deaths. Of the patients whose varicella was diagnosed within 3 weeks of receipt of prednisone, 70% had severe infection, whereas only 44% of those who had not received prednisone within 3 weeks had severe infection. The odds ratio for having a severe infection within 3 weeks of prednisone versus >3 weeks is 2.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-7.9). By multivariate analysis, older age at ALL diagnosis, years from ALL diagnosis to VZV diagnosis, and VZV diagnosis within the 4-week period of interest (during or within 3 weeks of prednisone therapy) all were independently associated with an increased risk for severe infection.

Conclusions: This study represents the largest study to date of varicella in children with ALL and provides convincing evidence that prednisone therapy during the VZV incubation period significantly increases the risk for developing severe varicella infection. In addition, older age is associated with more severe infection. Despite the varicella vaccine and a dropping incidence of primary infections, VZV remains a dangerous pathogen for pediatric patients with ALL. With the possible exception of induction therapy, patients who are on ALL therapy and are exposed to varicella should have steroid therapy delayed until after the VZV incubation period. These findings may have implications for other diseases that are treated with corticosteroids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-0219DOI Listing
October 2005

Central venous lines in children with lesser risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia: optimal type and timing of placement.

J Clin Oncol 2005 May;23(13):3024-9

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

Purpose: In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the optimal time for central venous line (CVL) insertion and the optimal type of CVL (internal v external) is unclear. This study was undertaken to compare complication rates between early versus late line insertion, and between internal versus external lines in children with lesser risk ALL.

Patients And Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients enrolled onto Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) protocol 9201. Data regarding demographics, CVL types and insertion dates, blood counts, and complications were reviewed through week 25 of therapy.

Results: Of 697 patients enrolled onto POG protocol 9201, 362 patients had sufficient data for analysis. When compared to late line placement (> day 15 of induction), early CVL placement (
Conclusion: In pediatric patients with lesser risk ALL, internal lines (ports) should be the preferred CVL type due to a lower risk of infectious and thrombotic complications. In addition, CVLs placed early in induction are associated with a higher risk of positive blood culture than those placed later in induction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2005.12.097DOI Listing
May 2005

Optimizing care with rasburicase.

J Support Oncol 2005 Mar-Apr;3(2):127-8

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

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June 2005

Vincristine-induced neuropathy as the initial presentation of charcot-marie-tooth disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2003 Apr;25(4):316-20

Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157-1081, USA.

Purpose: After profound peripheral neurotoxicity during induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the index patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth hereditary neuropathy (CMT), study coordinators of the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) front-line ALL protocols reviewed patient registrations to identify any other patients with possible CMT. The goal was to provide preliminary information about patients with undiagnosed CMT who develop ALL.

Patients And Methods: Five children with ALL who were enrolled in POG B-precursor or T-cell ALL protocols from 1994 to 1999 subsequently were determined to have CMT hereditary neuropathy. Their clinical presentations and treatment records were reviewed in detail. Records of all patients entered on POG 9201 (lesser-risk ALL) were reviewed to identify all cases of significant vincristine toxicity noted in the first 6 months of treatment.

Results: The five identified patients all had substantial peripheral neurotoxicity that required alteration in treatment and/or orthopedic/physical therapy evaluation and follow-up. The POG 9201 review identified 25 of 686 patients (3.6%) with significant peripheral neuropathy. Three of 25 were diagnosed with CMT; the others have had no testing reported.

Conclusions: A family history of CMT or other peripheral neuropathy should be sought at the time of diagnosis of ALL. Testing for CMT should be considered in any child with substantial vincristine-induced peripheral neurotoxicity. Treatment of such patients must be individualized. Testing of all patients with significant peripheral neuropathy would be necessary to determine the percentage of such neuropathy explained by underlying CMT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00043426-200304000-00010DOI Listing
April 2003

Religiosity is associated with the use of complementary medical therapies by pediatric oncology patients.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2003 Feb;25(2):125-9

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in pediatric oncology patients, the types of CAM used, and the factors associated with the use of CAM.

Patients And Methods: A questionnaire regarding CAM use was administered to patients/families seen in the pediatric oncology clinic at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center over a 12-month period.

Results: Based on 195 completed questionnaires, 91 (47%) patients reported use of CAM since diagnosis. Among CAM users, the most commonly used CAM therapies were faith healing, megavitamins/minerals, massage, other dietary supplements, relaxation techniques, and herbal medicines/teas. Forty-one percent of CAM users had not discussed CAM use with their physician(s). In bivariate analysis, CAM use was not associated with age at the time of survey, time since diagnosis, sex, race, parental education, or family income. A trend was noted between CAM use and older age at diagnosis. Families who reported themselves to be "very" religious were more likely to use CAM than those that are "somewhat" or "not at all" religious.

Conclusions: Use of CAM is common among pediatric oncology patients and often is not discussed with the treating physician(s). Patients from very religious families are more likely to use CAM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00043426-200302000-00008DOI Listing
February 2003