Publications by authors named "Alketa Hamzaj"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nivolumab plus Cabozantinib versus Sunitinib for Advanced Renal-Cell Carcinoma.

N Engl J Med 2021 03;384(9):829-841

From the Department of Medical Oncology, Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston (T.K.C.); the Department of Genitourinary Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Free National Health Service Trust, London (T.P.); the Bradford Hill Clinical Research Center, Santiago, Chile (M.B.); the Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France (B.E.); the Department of Hemato-Oncology, Urologic Oncology Clinic, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City (M.T.B.), the Department of Medical Oncology, Centro Universitario contra el Cáncer, Hospital Universitario "Dr. José Eleuterio González," Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Nuevo León (V.M.O.J.), and the Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital H+ Querétaro, Querétaro (J.P.F.) - all in Mexico; the Department of Outpatient Chemotherapy, Professor Franciszek Lukaszczyk Oncology Center, Bydgoszcz (B.Z.), and the Department of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Regional Specialist Hospital, Biała Podlaska (J. Żołnierek) - both in Poland; the Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis (J.J.H.); Oncology Unit 1, Department of Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto IRCCS, Padua (U.B.), the Department of Medical Oncology, Ospedale San Donato, Istituto Toscano i, Arezzo (A.H.), the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia (C.P.), and the University of Bari "A. Moro," Bari (C.P.) - all in Italy; the Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (A.Y.S.); the Department of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Barcelona Hospital Campus, Barcelona (C.S.); the Department of Medical Oncology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, QLD (J.C.G.), and Cabrini Monash University Department of Medical Oncology, Cabrini Health, Malvern, VIC (D.P.) - both in Australia; the Oncology Research Center, Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil (C.B.); Fundacion Richardet Longo, Instituto Oncologico de Cordoba, Cordoba (M.R.), and Instituto Multidisciplinario de Oncología, Clínica Viedma, Viedma (R.K.) - both in Argentina; the Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora (E.R.K.); the Departments of Urology and Molecular Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Y.T.), and the Department of Urology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (R.M.) - both in Japan; the Department of Urology, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (J.B.); the Departments of Clinical Research (J. Zhang.), Clinical Oncology (M.A.M.), Biostatistics (B.S.), and Health Economics and Outcomes Research (F.E.), Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ; the Department of Clinical Oncology, Exelixis, Alameda, CA (G.M.S.); the Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (A.B.A.); and the Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (R.J.M.).

Background: The efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus cabozantinib as compared with those of sunitinib in the treatment of previously untreated advanced renal-cell carcinoma are not known.

Methods: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label trial, we randomly assigned adults with previously untreated clear-cell, advanced renal-cell carcinoma to receive either nivolumab (240 mg every 2 weeks) plus cabozantinib (40 mg once daily) or sunitinib (50 mg once daily for 4 weeks of each 6-week cycle). The primary end point was progression-free survival, as determined by blinded independent central review. Secondary end points included overall survival, objective response as determined by independent review, and safety. Health-related quality of life was an exploratory end point.

Results: Overall, 651 patients were assigned to receive nivolumab plus cabozantinib (323 patients) or sunitinib (328 patients). At a median follow-up of 18.1 months for overall survival, the median progression-free survival was 16.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.5 to 24.9) with nivolumab plus cabozantinib and 8.3 months (95% CI, 7.0 to 9.7) with sunitinib (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.64; P<0.001). The probability of overall survival at 12 months was 85.7% (95% CI, 81.3 to 89.1) with nivolumab plus cabozantinib and 75.6% (95% CI, 70.5 to 80.0) with sunitinib (hazard ratio for death, 0.60; 98.89% CI, 0.40 to 0.89; P = 0.001). An objective response occurred in 55.7% of the patients receiving nivolumab plus cabozantinib and in 27.1% of those receiving sunitinib (P<0.001). Efficacy benefits with nivolumab plus cabozantinib were consistent across subgroups. Adverse events of any cause of grade 3 or higher occurred in 75.3% of the 320 patients receiving nivolumab plus cabozantinib and in 70.6% of the 320 patients receiving sunitinib. Overall, 19.7% of the patients in the combination group discontinued at least one of the trial drugs owing to adverse events, and 5.6% discontinued both. Patients reported better health-related quality of life with nivolumab plus cabozantinib than with sunitinib.

Conclusions: Nivolumab plus cabozantinib had significant benefits over sunitinib with respect to progression-free survival, overall survival, and likelihood of response in patients with previously untreated advanced renal-cell carcinoma. (Funded by Bristol Myers Squibb and others; CheckMate 9ER ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03141177.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2026982DOI Listing
March 2021

Efficacy and safety data in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma included in the nivolumab Expanded Access Program (EAP) in Italy.

PLoS One 2018 6;13(7):e0199642. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy.

Background: Results from phase III clinical trial CheckMate 025 have established nivolumab as the standard of care for treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) after VEGF inhibitor failure; however, elderly patients are under-represented in the registration trial and little is known about the activity of nivolumab in this subgroup. The purpose of the Expanded Access Program was to provide nivolumab to patients with mRCC who had progressed despite treatment with other agents that were considered standard of care.

Methods: Nivolumab 3 mg/kg was administered intravenously every 2 weeks to a maximum of 24 months or until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The current analysis included all patients from the EAP Italian cohort who had received ≥1 dose of nivolumab. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0.

Results: A total of 389 patients with advanced RCC were enrolled in the Italian cohort of the EAP and treated with nivolumab. Of these patients, 125 (32%) were at least 70 years of age and 70 (18%) were at least 75 years of age. Efficacy with nivolumab in the elderly patients was similar to that observed in the overall EAP population and in the CheckMate 025 trial. Safety was comparable between the elderly patients and the overall EAP population, and was consistent with what previously reported.

Conclusion: The final results suggest that elderly patients with pretreated metastatic RCC may benefit from therapy with nivolumab.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0199642PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034807PMC
December 2018

Docetaxel rechallenge in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: any place in the modern treatment scenario? An intention to treat evaluation.

Future Oncol 2015 Nov 5;11(22):3083-90. Epub 2015 Oct 5.

Medical Oncology, Ospedale della Gruccia, Azienda USL8, Istituto Toscano Tumori (ITT), Arezzo, Italy.

Background: We evaluated the possible advantages of a docetaxel (DCT) rechallenge strategy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients, also given the possible earlier positioning of this treatment option in the modern scenario.

Patients & Methods: All mCRPC patients planned for DCT chemotherapy rechallenge in our institutions were evaluated.

Results: Of 128 patients, 98 achieved disease control on the initial DCT round. After a treatment holiday of 8.3 months, the 98 responsive patients underwent a second DCT round, with 56 cases achieving again disease control. After a 5.7-month off-treatment period, 32 of these cases underwent a third DCT round, and 16 responded. Lastly, after a further 4.2-month treatment holiday, eight patients underwent a fourth DCT round and two responded. Median time to definitive disease progression for the whole population was 16.4 months.

Conclusions: Rechallenge with DCT may be considered a suitable treatment option for mCRPC patients recurring after a successful DCT chemotherapy. The interest in this strategy may be increased because of the showed efficacy of early DCT chemotherapy in patients with bulky disease (CHAARTED study) and the potential lower efficacy of the new hormonal agents abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide when used in a immediate sequencing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fon.15.217DOI Listing
November 2015

Immunologic checkpoints blockade in renal cell, prostate, and urothelial malignancies.

Semin Oncol 2015 Jun 12;42(3):495-505. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Medical Oncology and Immunotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Senese, University of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori (ITT), Siena, Italy.

Genitourinary (GU) tumors, and in particular renal cell and prostate cancer, represent one of the most dynamic areas in oncology from the scientific point of view. One of the most recent treatment approaches for GU tumors has focused on a series of molecules known as immune checkpoints and the possibility of manipulating immune responses against tumor cells by blocking these molecules with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and the immune checkpoint inhibitor mAbs ipilimumab and tremelimumab, represent the prototypes of this new growing class of agents called immunomodulating antibodies, while programmed death/ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) also has garnered a significant interest as a new immune checkpoints to target in urothelial cancer, with the anti-PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor mAbs nivolumab, MPDL-3280, and BMS-936559 as the first agents tested. Here we report the encouraging initial data observed in GU cancers with this new class of agents, which have reinforced the interest of investigating the therapeutic potential of the immune checkpoint modulators in large controlled trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.seminoncol.2015.02.004DOI Listing
June 2015

Clinical implications for a treatment algorithm and differential indication to hormone therapy and chemotherapy options in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: a personal view.

Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2014 Nov 29;14(11):1283-94. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Department of Oncology, U.O.C. of Medical Oncology, USL-8, Istituto Toscano Tumori (ITT), Ospedale San Donato, Arezzo, Italy.

Although docetaxel is still considered a mainstay of treatment in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), in the last few years, new agents have been developed to improve survival in this setting and reach a possible optimal personalized treatment strategy. In this paper, we provide a personal view and an algorithm for mCRPC patients, according to available evidence, personal opinion and experience. Abiratone acetate, cabazitaxel, radium-223, sipuleucel-T and enzalutamide, together with docetaxel, have demonstrated a survival benefit in these patients. The use of rechallenge with docetaxel in mCRPC patients with disease progression after a first response has been considered. These new agents complicated the scenario and posed the challenge to move from the old sequential to a new algorithm-based approach. At this stage, the algorithm is necessarily based on experts' opinion, since the efficacy of a single agent in a specific setting has not been validated by sequential trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/14737140.2014.965686DOI Listing
November 2014

Sunitinib therapy in metastatic papillary thyroid cancer.

Tumori 2013 Nov-Dec;99(6):285e-7e

We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with a follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. After surgery she experienced a relapse. Chemotherapy treatment led only to disease stabilization. In August 2009, we decided to start therapy with sunitinib 50 mg daily in an intermittent schedule (4 weeks on/2 weeks off). A CT scan after 3 months of treatment showed partial remission of disease according to the RECIST criteria. The patient continued sunitinib until January 2011, when CT evidenced progression in the mediastinal lymph nodes and pleura. Genetic analyses were carried out to determine if the clinical response in our patient was correlated with the presence of RET or BRAF mutations. No RET/PTC rearrangements or BRAF-V600E mutation, which are the two most common genetic alterations detected in papillary thyroid carcinoma, were found. It can be hypothesized that the activity of sunitinib in this patient was due to its antiangiogenic properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1700/1390.15470DOI Listing
April 2014

GOAL: an inverse toxicity-related algorithm for daily clinical practice decision making in advanced kidney cancer.

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2014 Mar 13;89(3):386-93. Epub 2013 Nov 13.

Department of Oncology, Istituto Toscano Tumori (ITT), Ospedale San Donato USL-8, Via Pietro Nenni, 20, 52100 Arezzo, Italy.

Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), considered almost an orphan disease only six years ago, appears today a very dynamic pathology. The recently switch to the actual overcrowded scenario defined by seven active drugs has driven physicians to an incertitude status, due to difficulties in defining the best possible treatment strategy. This situation is mainly related to the absence of predictive biomarkers for any available or new therapy. Such issue, associated with the nearly absence of published face-to-face studies, draws a complex picture frame. In order to solve this dilemma, decisional algorithms tailored on drug efficacy data and patient profile are recognized as very useful tools. These approaches try to select the best therapy suitable for every patient profile. On the contrary, the present review has the "goal" to suggest a reverse approach: basing on the pivotal studies, post-marketing surveillance reports and our experience, we defined the polarizing toxicity (the most frequent toxicity in the light of clinical experience) for every single therapy, creating a new algorithm able to identify the patient profile, mainly comorbidities, unquestionably unsuitable for each single agent presently available for either the first- or the second-line therapy. The GOAL inverse decision-making algorithm, proposed at the end of this review, allows to select the best therapy for mRCC by reducing the risk of limiting toxicities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.critrevonc.2013.09.002DOI Listing
March 2014

Lung cancer.

J Thorac Oncol 2007 May;2(5 Suppl):S24-6

Department of Medical Oncology, Perugia Hospita, Perugina, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.JTO.0000268637.10332.e3DOI Listing
May 2007

Development of new first-line therapeutic options for non-small-cell lung cancer.

Lung Cancer 2006 Dec 23;54 Suppl 2:S19-24. Epub 2006 Oct 23.

Department of Medical Oncology, Perugia Hospital, S. Andrea delle Fratte, 06156 Perugia, Italy.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the western world. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of these thoracic malignancies, with 1.2 million new cases diagnosed worldwide each year. The vast majority of NSCLC patients present with disease that is beyond the scope of surgical cure and are, therefore, candidates for palliative chemotherapy, which has been the subject of intensive investigation in recent years. Although platinum-based therapies modestly improve survival and palliate some tumour-related symptoms in patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC, at times the chemotherapy-related side effects outweigh the benefits. Consequently, the identification of new regimens that maintain the same level of efficacy as platinum-based combinations but offer a better toxicity profile is a key goal in this important area of medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2006.09.013DOI Listing
December 2006