Publications by authors named "Aline F Renz"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Soft Electronics Based on Stretchable and Conductive Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications.

Adv Healthc Mater 2021 02 17;10(3):e2001397. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), 333 Techno jungan-dareo, Daegu, 42988, South Korea.

Research on the field of implantable electronic devices that can be directly applied in the body with various functionalities is increasingly intensifying due to its great potential for various therapeutic applications. While conventional implantable electronics generally include rigid and hard conductive materials, their surrounding biological objects are soft and dynamic. The mechanical mismatch between implanted devices and biological environments induces damages in the body especially for long-term applications. Stretchable electronics with outstanding mechanical compliance with biological objects effectively improve such limitations of existing rigid implantable electronics. In this article, the recent progress of implantable soft electronics based on various conductive nanocomposites is systematically described. In particular, representative fabrication approaches of conductive and stretchable nanocomposites for implantable soft electronics and various in vivo applications of implantable soft electronics are focused on. To conclude, challenges and perspectives of current implantable soft electronics that should be considered for further advances are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202001397DOI Listing
February 2021

Opto-E-Dura: A Soft, Stretchable ECoG Array for Multimodal, Multiscale Neuroscience.

Adv Healthc Mater 2020 09 21;9(17):e2000814. Epub 2020 Jul 21.

Laboratory of Neural Circuit Dynamics, Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Zurich, 8057, Switzerland.

Soft, stretchable materials hold great promise for the fabrication of biomedical devices due to their capacity to integrate gracefully with and conform to biological tissues. Conformal devices are of particular interest in the development of brain interfaces where rigid structures can lead to tissue damage and loss of signal quality over the lifetime of the implant. Interfaces to study brain function and dysfunction increasingly require multimodal access in order to facilitate measurement of diverse physiological signals that span the disparate temporal and spatial scales of brain dynamics. Here the Opto-e-Dura, a soft, stretchable, 16-channel electrocorticography array that is optically transparent is presented. Its compatibility with diverse optical and electrical readouts is demonstrated enabling multimodal studies that bridge spatial and temporal scales. The device is chronically stable for weeks, compatible with wide-field and 2-photon calcium imaging and permits the repeated insertion of penetrating multielectrode arrays. As the variety of sensors and effectors realizable on soft, stretchable substrates expands, similar devices that provide large-scale, multimodal access to the brain will continue to improve fundamental understanding of brain function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202000814DOI Listing
September 2020

A guide towards long-term functional electrodes interfacing neuronal tissue.

J Neural Eng 2018 12 16;15(6):061001. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Implantable electronics address therapeutical needs of patients with electrical signaling dysfunctions such as heart problems, neurological disorders or hearing impairments. While standard electronics are rigid, planar and made of hard materials, their surrounding biological tissues are soft, wet and constantly in motion. These intrinsic differences in mechanical and chemical properties cause physiological responses that constitute a fundamental challenge to create functional long-term interfaces. Using soft and stretchable materials for electronic implants decreases the mechanical mismatch between implant and biological tissues. As a result, tissue damage during and after implantation is reduced, leading not only to an attenuated foreign body response, but also enabling completely novel applications. However, but for a few exceptions, soft materials are not sufficient to create long-term stable functional implants. In this work, we review recent progress in interfacing both the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) for long-term functional devices. The basics of soft and stretchable devices are introduced by highlighting the importance of minimizing physical as well as mechanical mismatch between tissue and implant in the CNS and emphasizing the relevance of an appropriate surface chemistry for implants in the PNS. Finally, we report on the latest materials and techniques that provide further electronic enhancements while reducing the foreign body reaction. Thus, this review should serve as a guide for creating long-term functional implants to enable future healthcare technologies and as a discussion on current ideas and progress within the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/aae0c2DOI Listing
December 2018

High-Density Stretchable Electrode Grids for Chronic Neural Recording.

Adv Mater 2018 Apr 28;30(15):e1706520. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

Electrical interfacing with neural tissue is key to advancing diagnosis and therapies for neurological disorders, as well as providing detailed information about neural signals. A challenge for creating long-term stable interfaces between electronics and neural tissue is the huge mechanical mismatch between the systems. So far, materials and fabrication processes have restricted the development of soft electrode grids able to combine high performance, long-term stability, and high electrode density, aspects all essential for neural interfacing. Here, this challenge is addressed by developing a soft, high-density, stretchable electrode grid based on an inert, high-performance composite material comprising gold-coated titanium dioxide nanowires embedded in a silicone matrix. The developed grid can resolve high spatiotemporal neural signals from the surface of the cortex in freely moving rats with stable neural recording quality and preserved electrode signal coherence during 3 months of implantation. Due to its flexible and stretchable nature, it is possible to minimize the size of the craniotomy required for placement, further reducing the level of invasiveness. The material and device technology presented herein have potential for a wide range of emerging biomedical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201706520DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5948103PMC
April 2018