Publications by authors named "Alicia Noemí Blanco"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Type 2A and 2M von Willebrand Disease: Differences in Phenotypic Parameters According to the Affected Domain by Disease-Causing Variants and Assessment of Pathophysiological Mechanisms.

Semin Thromb Hemost 2021 Jun 15. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Laboratorio de Hemostasia y Trombosis, IMEX-CONICET-Academia Nacional de Medicina de Buenos Aires. CABA, Argentina.

Type 2A and 2M von Willebrand disease (VWD) broadly show similar phenotypic parameters, but involve different pathophysiological mechanisms. This report presents the clinical and laboratory profiles of type 2A and type 2M patients genotypically diagnosed at one large center. Higher bleeding score values and a higher incidence of major bleeding episodes were observed in type 2A compared with type 2M, potentially reflective of the absence of large and intermediate von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers in 2A. In type 2A, most of disease-causing variants (DCVs) appeared to be responsible for increased VWF clearance and DCV clustered in the VWF-A1 domain resulted in more severe clinical profiles. In type 2M, DCV in the VWF-A1 domain showed different laboratory patterns, related to either reduced synthesis or shortened VWF survival, and DCV in the VWF-A2 domain showed patterns related mainly to shortened survival. VWF-type 1 collagen binding/Ag (C1B/Ag) showed different patterns according to DCV location: in type 2A VWD, C1B/Ag was much lower when DCVs were located in the VWF-A2 domain. In type 2M with DCV in the VWF-A1domain, C1B/Ag was normal, but with DCV in the VWF-A2 domain, C1B/Ag was low. The higher frequency of major bleeding in VWD 2M patients with DCV in the VWF-A2 domain than that with DCV in the VWF-A1 domain could be a summative effect of abnormal C1B/Ag, on top of the reduced VWF-GPIb binding. In silico modeling suggests that DCV impairing the VWF-A2 domain somehow modulates collagen binding to the VWF-A3 domain. Concomitant normal FVIII:C/Ag and VWFpp/Ag, mainly in type 2M VWD, suggest that other nonidentified pathophysiological mechanisms, neither related to synthesis/retention nor survival of VWF, would be responsible for the presenting phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1726097DOI Listing
June 2021

Type 2N von Willebrand disease: Is it always a recessive trait?

Thromb Res 2021 02 28;198:49-51. Epub 2020 Nov 28.

Laboratory of Hemostasis and Thrombosis, IMEX-CONICET-National Academy of Medicine, Buenos Aires City, Argentina; Departament of Hemostasis and Thrombosis, Hematological Research Institute, National Academy of Medicine, Buenos Aires City, Argentina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.11.029DOI Listing
February 2021

Phenotypic Parameters in Genotypically Selected Type 2B von Willebrand Disease Patients: A Large, Single-Center Experience Including a New Novel Mutation.

Semin Thromb Hemost 2017 Feb 15;43(1):92-100. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Laboratorio de Hemostasia y Trombosis, IMEX-CONICET, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

von Willebrand disease type 2B (VWD2B) expresses gain-of-function mutations that enhance binding of an individual's von Willebrand factor (VWF) to its platelet ligand, glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), and which are usually identified by increased ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA). We describe here the phenotypic profile of 38 genotypically selected VWD2B-affected family members (AFMs) belonging to 19 unrelated families. Major bleeding was observed in 68.4% of AFMs (previous to their diagnosis and registered by lifetime interviews), with a total of 46 episodes (1.21/patient), and was found to be highly related to the individual bleeding score and presence of thrombocytopenia, but otherwise unrelated to other laboratory parameters. Excessive muco-cutaneous bleeding symptoms were often reported, the most frequent of which comprised menorrhagia, epistaxis, easy bruising, and bleeding after teeth extraction/in oral cavity. Eight unaffected family members were also studied. The prevalence of VWD2B within families was 0.826, and the penetrance of mutations was complete, making it mandatory to study entire family sets to complete diagnostic profiles. Seven heterozygous missense mutations were found, the most common being p.V1316M. In the p.R1308C group, 75% of the AFMs showed absence of RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL, 66.6% of whom had VWF:RCo < 10 IU/dL, and 50% of whom had VWF:CB < 10 IU/dL. In the p.S1310F group, none of the AFMs had VWF:RCo/VWF:Ag < 0.6 (RCo/Ag), but 100% had VWF:CB/VWF:Ag < 0.6/(CB/Ag). Patients with p.P1266L and p.R1304V were characterized as atypical VWD2B. Two de novo mutations were found in four AFMs belonging to two families. We also describe a novel mutation: p.Y1258C. Of our patients, 70.5% had O blood group. In conclusion, a normal RCo/Ag and a negative RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL do not necessarily rule out a diagnosis of VWD2B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1597293DOI Listing
February 2017

Major haemorrhage related to surgery in patients with type 1 and possible type 1 von Willebrand disease.

Thromb Haemost 2008 Nov;100(5):797-802

Departamento de Hemostasia y Trombosis, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematológicas, Academia Nacional de Medicina (Buenos Aires), Pacheco de Melo 3081; (C1425AUM) Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) frequently bleed under a challenge. The aim of our study was to identify predictive markers of perioperative major haemorrhage in type 1 (VWF:RCo = 15-30 IU dl(-1)) and possible type 1 (VWF:RCo = 31-49 IU dl(-1)) VWD patients. We recorded perioperative bleeding complications previous to diagnosis and laboratory parameters in 311 patients with 498 surgical procedures. The patients were grouped according to the absence (A) or presence (B) of perioperative major haemorrhages. Eighty-one patients (26%) and 87 surgical procedures (17.5%) presented major haemorrhages associated with surgeries. There was no difference between the percentage of type 1 and possible type 1 VWD patients who had major haemorrhages (32.6% and 24.8% respectively; p = ns). No difference in the prevalence of O blood group, age, gender, positive family history and laboratory test results (FVIII and VWF) was observed, independent of the haemorrhagic tendency. Bleeding after tooth extraction was the most frequent clinical feature observed in patients with perioperative major haemorrhages. The bleeding score and the number of bleeding sites (> or = 3) were not predictors of major haemorrhage associated with surgery. Caesarean section and adenotonsillectomy showed the highest frequency of major haemorrhages (24.6% and 22.3%, respectively). In conclusion, type 1 and possible type 1 VWD patients showed similar incidence of perioperative major haemorrhages. Laboratory tests and positive family history did not prove to be effective at predicting major haemorrhages in patients that had either type 1 or possible type 1 VWD. The history of bleeding after tooth extraction could define risk factors of major haemorrhage.
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November 2008
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