Publications by authors named "Alice Banks"

5 Publications

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Pressure injury and risk in the inpatient paediatric and neonatal populations: A single centre point-prevalence study.

J Tissue Viability 2021 May 9;30(2):231-236. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Nottingham Childrens Hospital and Neonatal Services, Family Health Division, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK; Children and Young People Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Introduction: Prevention and management of pressure injury is a key nurse-sensitive quality indicator. From clinical insights, pressure injury effects hospitalised neonates and children, however it is unclear how prevalent this is. The aim of this study was to quantify prevalence of pressure injury, assess skin integrity risk level, and quantify preventive interventions in both neonatal and child inpatient populations at a large children's hospital in the UK.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken, assessing the skin integrity of all children allocated to a paediatric or neonatal bed in June/July 2020. A data collection tool was adapted from two established pressure ulcer point prevalence surveys (EUPAP and Medstrom pre-prevalence survey). Risk assessment was performed using the Braden QD scale.

Results: Eighty-eight participants were included, with median age of 0.85 years [range 0-17.5 years), with 32 (36%) of participants being preterm. Median length of hospital stay was 11 days [range 0-174 days]. Pressure ulcer prevalence was 3.4%. The majority of participants had at least two medical devices, with 16 (18.2%) having more than four. Having a medical device was associated with increased risk score of developing pressure injury (odds ratio [OR] 0.03, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.01-0.05, p = 0.02). Most children (39 (44%)) were reported not having proposed preventive measures in place aligned to their risk assessment. However, for those that did, 2 to 4 hourly repositioning was associated with a risk reduction on pressure damage (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.23, p = 0.01).

Conclusion: Overall, we found a low prevalence of pressure injury across preterm infants, children and young people at a tertiary children's hospital. Accurate risk assessment as well as availability and implementation of preventive interventions are a priority for healthcare institutes to avoid pressure injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtv.2021.02.004DOI Listing
May 2021

Cell-free protein synthesis in hydrogel materials.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2020 Jul 27;56(52):7108-7111. Epub 2020 May 27.

School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

We report a method for embedding cell-free protein synthesis reactions in macro-scale hydrogel materials without a free liquid phase. This paper focuses on methods of preparation for a variety of hydrogels and an investigation of the impact that the hydrogel material has on cell-free protein synthesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0cc02582hDOI Listing
July 2020

Bovistol B, bovistol D and strossmayerin: Sesquiterpene metabolites from the culture filtrate of the basidiomycete Coprinopsis strossmayeri.

PLoS One 2020 6;15(4):e0229925. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Basidiomycete fungi are a rich source of natural products with a diverse array of potentially exploitable bioactivities. Two dimeric sesquiterpenes, bovistol B (1) and D (2), and one monomeric sesquiterpene, strossmayerin (7), were isolated from the culture filtrate of the basidiomycete fungus Coprinopsis strossmayeri. The structures were determined through a combination of MS and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Likely monomeric precursors, identified on the basis of HRMS analysis, allow a plausible biosynthetic pathway to be proposed for the biosynthesis of 1 and 2, involving the dimerisation of the monomer through a hetero-Diels-Alder mechanism. A gene cluster, including a putative sesquiterpene 1-11 cyclase, was identified through phylogenetic and RNA-seq analysis, and is proposed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of 1 and 2.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0229925PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7135263PMC
July 2020

Genome Sequence of 150-1, the Causal Agent of Dry Bubble Disease.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2019 May 9;8(19). Epub 2019 May 9.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

The fungus causes dry bubble disease in the white button mushroom Control strategies are limited, as both the host and pathogen are fungi, and there is limited understanding of the interactions in this pathosystem. Here, we present the genome sequence of strain 150-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00340-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6509529PMC
May 2019

Draft Genome Sequence of the Coprinoid Mushroom .

Genome Announc 2017 Apr 6;5(14). Epub 2017 Apr 6.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

is a coprinoid mushroom favoring the habitat of herbivore dung. As a result of this highly competitive environment, is anticipated to produce a wide array of antimicrobial secondary metabolites (SMs) of potential pharmaceutical importance. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00044-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5383877PMC
April 2017
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