Publications by authors named "Algirdas Jaras"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pre-existingmental health disorders affect pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: a retrospectivecohort study.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2020 Jul 25;20(1):419. Epub 2020 Jul 25.

Faculty of Odontology, Clinic of Dental and Oral Pathology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Medical Academy, Eivenių Street 2, LT-50161, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Background: This was a hospital registry-based retrospective age-matched cohort study that aimed to compare pregnancy and neonatal outcomes of women with pre-existing mental disorders with those of mentally healthy women.

Methods: A matched cohort retrospective study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kauno Klinikos, a tertiary health care institution. Medical records of pregnant women who gave birth from 2006 to 2015 were used. The study group was comprised of 131 pregnant women with mental disorders matched to 228 mentally healthy controls. The primary outcomes assessed were antenatal care characteristics; secondary outcomes were neonatal complications.

Results: Pregnant women with pre-existing mental health disorders were significantly more likely to have low education, be unmarried and unemployed, have a disability that led to lower working capacity, smoke more frequently, have chronic concomitant diseases, attend fewer antenatal visits, gain less weight, be hospitalized during pregnancy, spend more time in hospital during the postpartum period, and were less likely to breastfeed their newborns. The newborns of women with pre-existing mental disorders were small for gestational age (SGA) more often than those of healthy controls (12.9% vs. 7.6%, p < 0.05). No difference was found comparing the methods of delivery.

Conclusions: Women with pre-existing mental health disorders had a worse course of pregnancy. Mental illness increased the risk to deliver a SGA newborn (RR 2.055, 95% CI 1.081-3.908).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-03094-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7382029PMC
July 2020

Clinical and Microbiological Findings of Vulvovaginitis in Prepubertal Girls.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2019 Dec 21;32(6):574-578. Epub 2019 Aug 21.

Laboratory Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Study Objective: To evaluate genital microbiological findings in prepubertal girls with vulvovaginitis and in healthy controls.

Design: Prospective case-control study.

Setting: Pediatric Outpatient unit of the Department of Pediatrics of the Hospital of the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kauno Klinikos from November 2014 to May 2017.

Participants: Fifty-two prepubertal girls aged 1-9 years diagnosed with vulvovaginitis, and 42 age-matched healthy controls.

Interventions And Main Outcome Measures: Samples for microbiological culture were collected using sterile cotton swabs from the introitus and the lower third of the vagina from all study participants. Microbiological findings were analyzed according to bacteria type and intensity of growth.

Results: Most of the vaginal microbiological swab results were positive for bacterial growth: 47 (90.4%) and 34 (80.9%) were similar in the study and control groups, respectively (P = .24). Sixteen (30.8%) and 9 (21.4%) of the microbiological traits results in the case and control groups, respectively, were regarded as potential causative agents (P = .27). Streptococcus pyogenes was the most frequent pathogen in the study group (P = .03); all other microorganisms detected as either a pure or dominant growth in the control group, were considered opportunistic.

Conclusions: Vaginal bacterial culture results were positive in prepubertal girls with vulvovaginitis and in healthy controls. Nonspecific vulvovaginitis without a dominant/isolated pathogen was seen to be more common than vulvovaginitis with a potential causative agent. Clinical symptoms were more frequent among girls when the potential infectious agent was identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2019.08.009DOI Listing
December 2019
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