Publications by authors named "Alexis Nadeau"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Role of the Dental Community in Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Through HPV Vaccine Advocacy.

J Cancer Educ 2021 Apr;36(2):299-304

Robert Larner, MD College of Medicine, University of Vermont, 89 Beaumont Ave, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA.

As rates of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) continue to rise, the dental community's role in primary prevention efforts related to HPV vaccination will become increasingly important. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, beliefs, practices, and perceived barriers regarding HPV and HPV vaccine advocacy within the dental community. A sample of 266 dentists and dental hygienists completed an online survey, and responses were then analyzed using frequencies of responses, t tests, chi-square tests, and Spearman's correlations. Ninety percent of providers believe it is important to play an "active role" in their patients' general medical care, yet only 50% believe it is their responsibility to recommend the HPV vaccine. Only 50% feel knowledgeable enough to recommend the vaccine. 78.6% of providers rarely discuss HPV vaccination with their age-appropriate patients, and 82% rarely recommend the vaccine. The two most strongly agreed-upon barriers were "parent concerns about the safety or efficacy of the vaccine" (71.6%) and "parent opposition to HPV vaccination for philosophical or religious reasons" (72.6%). Dentists were more knowledgeable about HPV vaccination and more likely to recommend the vaccine than hygienists. Higher levels of HPV-related knowledge correlated positively with beliefs and practices that support HPV vaccine advocacy. We have identified multiple opportunities for intervention aimed at increasing vaccine advocacy among oral health providers. These include clarification of role from dental professional organizations, alleviation of concerns related to perceived parental objection to the vaccine, and educational interventions targeting knowledge deficits among oral health providers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01628-wDOI Listing
April 2021

Genome Sequence of Phage Saddex.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2018 Sep 20;7(11). Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Department of Natural Science, Assumption College, Worchester, Massachusetts, USA.

The complete genome of Bacillus phage Saddex was determined and annotated in this study. Saddex has distinct sections with similarities to other Bacillus phages, such as Kida, even though these phages were isolated more than 800‚ÄČkm apart by separate laboratories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01044-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256669PMC
September 2018

Feeling the Beat: Bouncing Synchronization to Vibrotactile Music in Hearing and Early Deaf People.

Front Neurosci 2017 12;11:507. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

International Laboratory for Brain, Music, and SoundMontreal, QC, Canada.

The ability to dance relies on the ability to synchronize movements to a perceived musical beat. Typically, beat synchronization is studied with auditory stimuli. However, in many typical social dancing situations, music can also be perceived as vibrations when objects that generate sounds also generate vibrations. This vibrotactile musical perception is of particular relevance for deaf people, who rely on non-auditory sensory information for dancing. In the present study, we investigated beat synchronization to vibrotactile electronic dance music in hearing and deaf people. We tested seven deaf and 14 hearing individuals on their ability to bounce in time with the tempo of vibrotactile stimuli (no sound) delivered through a vibrating platform. The corresponding auditory stimuli (no vibrations) were used in an additional condition in the hearing group. We collected movement data using a camera-based motion capture system and subjected it to a phase-locking analysis to assess synchronization quality. The vast majority of participants were able to precisely time their bounces to the vibrations, with no difference in performance between the two groups. In addition, we found higher performance for the auditory condition compared to the vibrotactile condition in the hearing group. Our results thus show that accurate tactile-motor synchronization in a dance-like context occurs regardless of auditory experience, though auditory-motor synchronization is of superior quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2017.00507DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5601036PMC
September 2017
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