Publications by authors named "Alexis Cerisier"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predictors of high-degree conduction disturbances and pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Prognostic role of the electrophysiological study.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2021 Mar 19. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Division of Cardiology, Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Predictors of high-degree atrioventricular block (HAVB) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are recognized, but the electrophysiological study's (EPS) role is still a subject to debate. The objective of our study was to determine factors associated with PPM implantation including the potential role of EPS before and/or after TAVR.

Methods And Results: Seventy four consecutive patients (pts) were included and 21 pts (28.4%) received a PPM during the immediate postoperative follow-ups (until Day 5): HAVB in 15 pts (71.4%), prophylactic implantation due to a documented increased HV interval ≥ 95-100 ms plus LBBB in 2 pts (9.5%), a high-degree HV block evidenced at the EPS plus LBBB in 3 pts (14.3%) and one additional patient was implanted for AV-block in presence of AFib (4.8%). In the multivariate model 1 including parameters before TAVR, both prosthesis diameter and PR lengthening remained significantly associated with PPM as well RBBB. In the multivariate model 2 including parameters after TAVR, only HV remained significantly associated with the risk of PPM (OR = 1.15 (1.05-1.26), p = .004). When all the significant variables in models 1 and 2 were analyzed together in model 3, only HV after TAVR remained significantly associated with an increased risk of PPM.

Conclusions: In this prospective observational study, it was revealed that a Day 4-5 EPS is likely to more precisely stratify the risk of PPM implantation regarding its ability to discover asymptomatic severe infra-hisian conduction disturbances particularly in presence of LBBB. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic value of HV alteration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pace.14225DOI Listing
March 2021

Impact of very high pressure stent deployment on angiographic and long-term clinical outcomes in true coronary bifurcation lesions treated by the mini-crush stent technique: A single center experience.

Indian Heart J 2017 Jan - Feb;69(1):32-36. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for bifurcation lesions (BL) using 2 stents technique is known to be associated with high rates of procedural failure especially on the side branch (SB) mainly due to stent incomplete apposition. Stent deployment at very high pressure (SDHP) may lead to better stent expansion and apposition. However, SDHP may also be at the origin of deeper wall injury resulting into major cardiac adverse events. No data are available on evaluation of SDHP in BL treated by a mini-crush stent technique.

Methods: One hundred and thirteen consecutive patients underwent PCI for BL (Medina 1, 1, 1) using a mini-crush stent technique with SDHP defined as ≥20atm. An angiographic follow-up was performed at 6 month and clinical follow-up was obtained at a median of 3 years.

Results: Stent deployment mean pressures were 20±1.4atm (range 20-25) in the main vessel (MV) and 20±1.5atm (range 20-25) in SB. Simultaneous final kissing balloon was used in 92% of cases. PCI was successful in 100%. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in 83% of patients. Restenosis rate was 13% (12% restenosis in the SB) with only one case (0.8%) of SB probable thrombosis. Another case of late stent thrombosis occurred at a 3 years clinical follow-up.

Conclusion: Compared with previously published studies in which stents were deployed at lower pressure, SDHP does not increase the restenosis rate in BL using mini-crush stent technique but seems to reduce the rate of stent thrombosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2016.05.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5318982PMC
October 2017

Restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary chronic total occlusion. The central role of an optimized immediate post-procedural angiographic result.

Int J Cardiol 2016 Dec 16;224:343-347. Epub 2016 Sep 16.

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Background: Factors of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) have not been fully explored. In particular, although the last ACC/AHA guidelines on PCI suggest that a minimum diameter stenosis of 10% with an optimal goal of as close to 0% as possible should be the new benchmark for lesions treated by stenting, angiographic success of PCI for CTO remains in the literature most often defined as a <30% residual diameter stenosis. Whether an optimized immediate post-PCI angiographic result (OAR) defined by a minimal diameter stenosis as close to 0% is associated with a lower restenosis rate in this subset of coronary lesions remains unknown.

Methods: Therefore, we assessed by quantitative coronary analysis (QCA) both the immediate post-PCI and 6-month follow-up angiographic results of 170 successfully treated true CTO.

Results: Post-PCI QCA immediate residual diameter stenosis was <30% in all 170 CTOs and OAR defined as a ≤10% residual stenosis was achieved in 133 (78%). Global binary restenosis rate was 21% in the 170 lesions. Restenosis rates were 46% and 14% in the non-OAR group and in the OAR group, respectively (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that a non-OAR, a younger age and a retrograde approach were independent factors of restenosis.

Conclusion: Thus, an optimized immediate angiographic result with a minimal diameter stenosis as close to 0% as possible appears to be associated with a lower rate of restenosis after CTO PCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.09.028DOI Listing
December 2016

Long-term clinical outcome and routine angiographic follow-up after successful recanalization of complex coronary true chronic total occlusion with a long stent length: a single-center experience.

J Invasive Cardiol 2013 Jul;25(7):323-9

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Objectives: To evaluate clinical and angiographic outcomes after successful recanalization of chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) with implantation of a long total stent length (SL).

Background: Routine follow-up angiogram (RFUA) data after successful recanalization of CTO with a long SL are lacking.

Methods: RFUAs were performed at 6 months after successful recanalization of 106 CTOs using drug-eluting stents (DESs) with a long SL (≥ 20 mm) in 102 consecutive patients.

Results: Mean number of stents was 3.9 ± 1.8 and mean total SL was 78 ± 32 mm (range, 23-174 mm). Sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) were used in 100 lesions. In-stent total reocclusion occurred in 2 cases (1 SES and 1 non-SES DES). Restenosis rate was 18% in the 100 SES subgroup (total SL, 79 ± 33 mm; range, 23-174 mm; mean number of stents, 3.9 ± 1.8); younger age and longer total SL were found to be independent predictors of restenosis (longer age: hazard ratio, 0.939; 95% confidence interval, 0.885-0.996; P=.035; longer total SL: hazard ratio, 1.017; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.03; P=.045). Restenosis type was diffuse in only 11% and 89% were successfully treated by repeat percutaneous coronary intervention. During a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range, 1-4.3 years), major cardiac events other than those angiographically driven at RFUA occurred in 2 patients.

Conclusion: Angiographic restenosis rate remains acceptable in patients with complex CTO successfully treated by DES despite a long SL.
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July 2013

Immediate and long-term results of a modified simultaneous kissing stenting for percutaneous coronary intervention of coronary artery bifurcation lesions.

J Invasive Cardiol 2013 Mar;25(3):126-31

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Objectives: We propose a modified simultaneous kissing stenting technique (MSKS) based on systematic implantation of a protective stent in the proximal main vessel (PMV) proximally to the bifurcation before simultaneous kissing stenting (SKS).

Background: SKS has been proposed in large-size coronary vessel bifurcation lesions (BLs) when the PMV can accommodate two stents. SKS implies, however, low-pressure simultaneous final balloon inflations to avoid retrograde PMV dissection or rupture and therefore may not ensure optimal final stent apposition.

Methods: From January 2005 to May 2008, a total of 97 patients with 100 BLs (true bifurcation in 92%) who underwent MSKS were enrolled in a prospective registry. Drug-eluting stents were used for distal main vessel and side branch. Drug-eluting or large-size bare-metal stents were used as proximal protective stents.

Results: Immediate procedural success rate was 100%. Global restenosis rate was 10% (5% in the main vessel and 8% in the side branch) at follow-up angiogram performed at 7 months in all patients (100%). No patient had early or late stent thrombosis. Two cases of non-fatal very late stent thrombosis occurred at 46 and 64 months. Over a mean 4.5-year follow-up period, target lesion revascularization rate was 11%, with only 3% driven by clinical ischemia.

Conclusion: Protective stent systematic implantation in the PMV represents a newly modified SKS technique that allows safe finalization of the procedure by high-pressure kissing balloon final inflation, ensuring optimal stent apposition with high immediate procedural success and low rates of long-term events.
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March 2013

Simultaneous dual vascular access site for the treatment of coronary artery bifurcation lesions by complex 2-stent technique.

J Interv Cardiol 2012 Oct 7;25(5):439-46. Epub 2012 Jun 7.

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Objectives: To propose an original approach based on simultaneous dual vascular access site (DAS) using 2 small-size guiding catheters to easily perform complex 2-stent techniques for bifurcation coronary lesions (BL).

Background: Simultaneous kissing stenting and classic crush technique require large 7 or 8Fr guiding catheters leading to large amounts of contrast medium, vascular access site complications, and sometimes frictions or criss-cross of the 2-stent delivery systems.

Methods: DAS was used in 30 patients with BL (11 radio-radial, 16 radio-femoral, and 3 femoro-femoral). Among 60 guiding catheters, the size was 5Fr in 28, 6Fr in 30, and 7Fr in 2 cases of double adjacent BL. When 2 different size catheters were used, contrast medium injections were done using the smallest size catheter. DAS patients were compared with a group of 30 BL patients treated using a single femoral vascular access site (SAS) with 7 or 8Fr catheters.

Results: Success rate was 100% in all patients. Contrast volume used was smaller in DAS than in SAS patients (277 ± 156 cc vs. 380 ± 165 cc,P = 0.01). No vascular access site complication occurred in the sub-group of the 11 DAS radio-radial patients. Postintervention hospitalization duration was shorter in DAS than in SAS (1.9 ± 2 vs. 2.8 ± 2 days,P = 0.048).

Conclusion: DAS allows to successfully perform complex stenting technique of BL using small-size guiding catheters leading to decreased contrast medium volume, decreased vascular access site complications rates, and shortened hospitalization duration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8183.2012.00745.xDOI Listing
October 2012

Anatomical factors involved in difficult cardiac resynchronization therapy procedure: a non-invasive study using dual-source 64-multi-slice computed tomography.

Europace 2012 Jun 23;14(6):833-40. Epub 2011 Nov 23.

Division of Cardiology, Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France.

Aims: In cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) procedure, left ventricular (LV) lead implantation is time consuming. In this clinical setting, no study has investigated the impact of right atrium anatomical parameters on both CRT implantation procedure duration and X-ray exposure. Additionally, only few studies have examined the coronary sinus (CS) using dual-source 64-multi-slice computed tomography (DS 64-MSCT), and its impact on CRT procedure parameters has not yet been investigated. The aim of this prospective study was to identify local anatomical predictive factors of difficult CRT implantation procedure using DS 64-MSCT.

Methods And Results: Between January and July 2010, 50 consecutive patients underwent primo CRT implantation. The patient population had a mean age of 70 ± 10 years, and was 34% female, with New York Heart Association Class 3.2 ± 0.3 heart failure, left ventricle ejection fraction 30 ± 4%, and QRS width 157 ± 30 ms. Cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation was attempted in 50 patients, and first LV lead implantation was obtained in 49 of 50 patients (98% primary success). One implantation failed (2%) due to unsuccessful LV lead implant. Procedure parameters were as follows: LV threshold, 1.4 ± 0.8 V; LV wave amplitude, 17 ± 8 mV; LV impedance, 830 ± 240 Ω; median procedure time (skin to skin), 51 min (38 min); median fluoroscopy procedure time, 11.9 min (22 min); and median LV fluoroscopic time, 10.3 min (22 min). In 10 patients (20%), procedures were difficult requiring an implantation lasting ≥ 85 min. The only predictive factor for difficult CRT implantation was the insertion level of the CS ostium (CSO), evaluated by the distance between the CSO and the bottom floor of the right atrium (14.8 ± 4 vs. 9.5 ± 4; P= 0.01). Neither the right atrium dilation nor right ventricular dysfunction was associated with difficult CRT implantation procedures.

Conclusions: Today, despite improvements in the materials used, problems still remain in the CRT procedure. In this clinical setting, the only predictive factor for very long CRT procedures is the CSO-level insertion (located high). This anatomical anomaly identified by DS 64-MSCT prior to surgery is responsible for 20% of difficult CRT device implantation procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/eur350DOI Listing
June 2012

Return to work after acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in the modern era of reperfusion by direct percutaneous coronary intervention.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2010 May 23;103(5):310-6. Epub 2010 Jun 23.

hôpital Nord, CHU de Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Previous studies have evaluated return to work after acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated medically, after bypass surgery or after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease. However, there are few data regarding return to work after acute STEMI treated by direct PCI.

Aims: To analyse the factors influencing return to work after STEMI treated by direct PCI.

Methods: Two hundred consecutive patients who underwent direct PCI for acute STEMI and who were employed at the time of their STEMI were studied. Stents were used in 94% of patients and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in 77%.

Results: Among the 200 patients, 152 (76%) patients returned to work and 48 (24%) did not. Patients who did not return to work did not differ from those who returned to work in terms of time from onset of chest pain to PCI, STEMI location, left ventricular function, extent of vessel disease, PCI technique and success, completeness of revascularization, duration of hospital stay, intrahospital complications and performance of cardiac rehabilitation. Multivariable analysis showed that older age, daytime onset of chest pain, manual labour, rapid call-out of the emergency medical team, unmarried status and a limited number of risk factors were independent predictors of non-return to work.

Conclusion: Age, sociopsychological and occupational factors appear to be the strongest predictors of return to work after STEMI treated by direct PCI. Clinical and procedural factors as well as cardiac rehabilitation appear to have no impact on return to work in this subset of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2010.04.007DOI Listing
May 2010

The value of stress single-photon emission computed tomography imaging performed routinely at 6 months in asymptomatic patients for predicting angiographic restenosis after successful direct percutaneous intervention for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction.

Coron Artery Dis 2008 Mar;19(2):89-97

Department of Cardiology, Hôpital Nord, University of Saint Etienne, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Saint Etienne, 42055 Saint Etienne Cedex 2, France.

Aims: The authors tested the value of stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging performed systematically for detecting angiographic restenosis in asymptomatic patients who underwent direct percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Angiographic restenosis of the infarct-related artery after direct PCI for STEMI is often silent and the strategy for follow-up evaluation of asymptomatic patients remains debated.

Methods: A total of 149 patients successfully treated by direct PCI (96% stenting) for STEMI with no symptoms during the follow-up systematically underwent both rest thallium 201/stress Tc 99m setamibi myocardial perfusion imaging and coronary angiogram at 6 months. Patients were followed up for 2.5+/-0.5 years after 6 months control for cardiac events.

Results: In the 149 patients, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of SPECT imaging were 48, 61, 35, 72 and 57%, respectively, for detecting binary angiographic restenosis defined as > or =50% diameter stenosis. Whether stress testing was maximal or performed after withheld anti-ischemic drugs did not improve the results. Reversible ischemia at SPECT in the infarct territory did not predict long-term cardiac events.

Conclusion: These data suggest a poor correlation between stress SPECT imaging and angiographic restenosis at 6 months in patients treated by direct PCI for STEMI who remain asymptomatic at follow-up. The long-term clinical prognostic value of SPECT reversible ischemia in the infarct territory appears also limited in this peculiar subset of patients. These findings should be taken into account in the strategy of the clinical follow-up of this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCA.0b013e3282f0a288DOI Listing
March 2008

A new approach of primary angioplasty for ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction based on minimalist immediate mechanical intervention.

Coron Artery Dis 2006 May;17(3):261-9

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Objectives: No reflow has been reported in 12-30% of the patients directly revascularized by angioplasty for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction with the highest incidence after primary stenting in patients with initial thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) grade 0 flow. We hypothesized that a minimalist immediate mechanical intervention (MIMI) based on the use of very small size balloons to avoid both large dissection and distal embolization may be sufficient to restore flow in emergency and that recanalization may be sustained by maximized antithrombotic regimen (abcximab, clopidogrel, aspirin and heparin) allowing one to postpone stenting in better conditions.

Methods: MIMI was performed in 93 patients for ST elevation myocardial infarction with initial TIMI grade 0 flow.

Results: MIMI resulted in a TIMI grade 3 flow in 77/93 patients (83%). Immediate stenting was performed in the 16 patients with failed MIMI and resulted in a TIMI grade 3 flow in nine (56%). The residual stenosis after MIMI was 81+/-11% and ST segment resolution (> or =50%) at 1 h after reperfusion was obtained in 84%. Stenting was performed the following days in 52 patients with a post-stenting TIMI grade 3 flow in 50 (96%; 100% when stenting done beyond 24 h). No reocclusion occurred between MIMI and stenting. Among the 25 patients without stenting, six had mild stenosis at control angiogram and underwent medical treatment whereas 19 had multiple vessel disease and underwent bypass surgery.

Conclusions: MIMI combined with maximized antithrombotic therapy results in immediate and sustained recanalization with a high rate of ST resolution in a majority of patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction. This approach allows one to postpone stenting in more stable conditions with a low rate of TIMI flow deterioration or to schedule more appropriate medical or surgical alternative management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00019501-200605000-00010DOI Listing
May 2006

Simplified cardiac resynchronization implantation technique involving right access and a triple-guide/single introducer approach.

Heart Rhythm 2005 Jul;2(7):714-9

Division of Cardiology, University Jean Monnet of Saint-Etienne, 42055 Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Biventricular pacing is useful for patients with congestive heart failure but has the disadvantage of being a long, user-dependent, highly technical procedure.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to simplify the procedure. The simplified technique consists of sinus (CS) venography prior to implantation, direct coronary access for the left ventricular (LV) lead without use of a left-heart delivery system, and triple-guide/one introducer cephalic vein access as the first approach in patients presenting in sinus rhythm.

Methods: A cephalic cutdown was performed, and a steerable hydrophilic guidewire was introduced in the cephalic vein. A 9Fr introducer was advanced over the guidewire, and two other guides were inserted through the introducer. This technique allowed for insertion of a right ventricular lead, an LV lead, and an atrial lead.

Results: One hundred three patients were evaluated from January 2002 to September 2004. Four implants failed (3.9%). The 7Fr LV lead was successfully placed in 99 of 103 patients (96.1%) directly via the 9Fr introducer, without use of a dedicated left-heart delivery system. The final position was lateral in 59 patients, posterolateral in 33, posterior in 4, and anterolateral in 3. Sixty patients were in sinus rhythm, 13 were in atrial fibrillation, and 26 had a previous pacemaker (n = 21) or defibrillator (n = 5). Triple cephalic vein access was possible in 48 of the patients in sinus rhythm (80%). Procedure parameters were as follows: LV threshold 0.9 +/- 0.7 V, LV wave amplitude 15 +/- 8 mV, LV impedance 790 +/- 232 Omega, skin-to-skin procedure time 76 +/- 33 minutes, and fluoroscopy time 23 +/- 19 minutes. Ten complications (10.1%) occurred: 7 lead dislodgments (3 within 48 hours and 4 within 6 months) requiring repositioning (7.1%), 1 subacute local infection requiring explantation (1%), 1 phrenic nerve stimulation (1%), and 1 pneumothorax (1%). The long-term success of biventricular pacing was 93.1%.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation can be simplified with the combined use of a steerable hydrophilic guidewire, three guides, and one introducer via a right cephalic vein, without use of a left-heart delivery system. The triple cephalic vein approach yields an 80% implant success rate for patients in sinus rhythm. The long-term success of biventricular pacing was 93.1%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2005.04.005DOI Listing
July 2005

How important is the impact of pressure recovery on routine evaluation of aortic stenosis? A clinical study in 91 patients.

J Heart Valve Dis 2004 May;13(3):347-56

Division of Cardiology, University of Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne, France.

Background And Aim Of The Study: Experimental investigations and invasive studies conducted in small series of patients using specially designed high-fidelity micromanometer tip catheters have suggested that downstream pressure recovery (PR) within the aorta may significantly affect transvalvular pressure gradient (PG) measurement. The study aims were to evaluate in a large cohort of patients the extent of PR when transvalvular PGs are routinely measured by fluid-filled pigtail side-hole catheters (FPC) using pullback from the left ventricle to the ascending aorta (AO), and to analyze factors influencing PR. The influence of PR on the correlation between catheter and Doppler PG measurements was also assessed in a subset of patients.

Methods: Transvalvular PG were measured in 91 patients with aortic stenosis using FPC pullback with the catheter positioned at different sites within the ascending aorta. In 71 patients, Doppler echocardiography was obtained within 24 h of catheterization.

Results: Mean PR ranged from 0 to 20 mmHg, corresponding to a PR index (percent of maximal PG) ranging from 0 to 31%. PG was < 50 mmHg in nine of 61 patients (15%) with a PG > 50 mmHg at the origin of the aorta when further measurements were conducted with the catheter positioned more distally in the ascending aorta. PR index better correlated with the ratio of valve area to ascending AO cross-sectional area (r = 0.61, p = 0.001) than with valve area (r = 0.37, p = 0.001) and ascending AO cross-sectional area (0.27, p = 0.02) alone. Differences between Doppler- and catheter-predicted PG were minimized when correcting Doppler by non-invasively calculated PR (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion: The magnitude of PR recorded in aortic stenosis by FPC, as used in most clinical catheterization laboratories, is low in the vast majority of patients. As predicted from fluid mechanics theory, the ratio of valve area to ascending AO cross-sectional area is the central determinant of PR. PR may affect the Doppler-catheter correlation in some patients.
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May 2004

Long term prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction and normal coronary angiography: impact of inherited coagulation disorders.

Thromb Haemost 2004 Feb;91(2):388-93

Division of Cardiology, University Jean Monnet of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France.

The prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and normal coronary arteries (NCA) in the presence of an inherited coagulation disorder is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical thrombosis outcome of patients with (GpI) or without (GpII), inherited coagulation disorders, who suffered from an acute MI with NCA. Eighty two consecutive patients (mean age 49 +/- 15 years; 29 females) with MI, but NCA, were recruited. Twelve patients (15%) had an inherited coagulation disorder. GpI and GpII were statistically similar regarding age (45 +/- 11 vs 50 +/- 16 years-old), gender (33 vs. 36% female), tobacco consumption (50 vs. 53%), diabetes mellitus (8 vs. 10%), hypertension (25 vs. 17%), obesity (8.3 vs. 14%), family history of coronary heart disease (33 vs. 19%), hypercholesterolemia (50 vs. 21%; p =.08), left ventricular ejection fraction (58 +/- 13 vs. 61 +/- 13%) and spasm (8.3% vs. 17%). All patients were initially treated with antiplatelet agents with the exception of one (8%) in GpI, and 6 (9%) in GpII who were taking oral anticoagulant therapy (ns). The mean follow-up was 57 +/- 26 (range from 2-91 months). During the outcome, 12/78 (15.4%) thrombosis events occurred, including venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (1/12 vs. 1/66), reinfarction (2/12 vs. 4/66), and stroke (2/12 vs. 2/66), with two events in one patient (GpI). Kaplan-Meier event-free survival, with combined end-point, defined as venous thrombo-embolic event, reinfarction, or stroke differed between the two groups: 4/12 (33.3%) in GpI and 7/66 (10.6%) in Gp II (p <.02). Patients with MI, NCA and congenital coagulation disorder present a high risk of thrombosis recurrence under antiplatelet agent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1160/TH03-07-0442DOI Listing
February 2004

Noninvasive quantitation of blood flow turbulence in patients with aortic valve disease using online digital computer analysis of Doppler velocity data.

J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2003 Sep;16(9):965-74

University of Saint Etienne, France.

Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that aortic valve disease is associated with significant downstream turbulence (T). In this study, we developed a noninvasive method on the basis of Doppler velocity recording for quantitating aortic blood flow T in patients with aortic valve disease. The instantaneous blood velocity at a point in the aorta is equal to the sum of a mean periodic velocity component with a random or turbulent velocity component. According to the ensemble average method, time mean absolute T intensity is the root-mean-square value of turbulent velocity averaged over time and T is better quantitated by the relative T intensity (TIr), which is the ratio of absolute T intensity to the ensemble average velocity averaged over time. We computed TIr in 18 patients with mild to severe aortic stenosis and in 13 healthy volunteers from instantaneous modal velocities of 70 cycle length-matched heart beats recorded in the proximal part of the descending aorta by pulsed Doppler using an ultrasound system with an output port for online digital data transfer into a microcomputer. TIr was greater in patients with aortic valve disease (18.4 +/- 5.1%, range 11.2%-28.9%) than in control patients (7.9 +/- 1.9%, range 4.8%-9.8%; P =.0001). In patients with aortic valve disease, TIr was better linearly related to the ratio of postvalvular aorta to valvular orifice cross-sectional areas (r = 0.89, P =.0001) than to other parameters of valve restriction: transvalvular pressure gradient (r = 0.78, P =.0001); valve area (r = -0.56, P =.01); and valve resistance (r = 0.72, P =.0002). Thus, T that can be computed noninvasively from direct digital transfer of Doppler velocity data appears to be linearly related to indices of aortic valve restriction. Our data support the concept of the postvalvular aorta to valvular orifice cross-sectional areas ratio as a new important hemodynamic parameter in patients with aortic valve disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0894-7317(03)00420-6DOI Listing
September 2003

[Prognostic factors of invasive bladder cancer with lymph node invasion].

Prog Urol 2002 Sep;12(4):615-20

Service d'Urologie-Andrologie, Hôpital Nord, CHU, Saint-Etienne.

Objective: To identify the prognostic factors influencing survival and to assess the value of extensive lymphadenectomy in invasive bladder cancer with lymph node invasion.

Material And Methods: The medical records of 62 patients treated by cystectomy with curative lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder cancer with lymph node invasion were reviewed. Thirty four patients had lymph node dissection ascending at least as far as the common iliac vessels, 26 had pelvic lymph node dissection and 2 had simple lymph node biopsies.

Results: The 2-, 3- and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 37%, 26.6% and 23.6%, respectively, with a median survival of 18.4 months. This study appears to show the independent prognostic value of the following factors: tumour strictly confined to the bladder (< or = pT3a) (p = 0.002), < or = 2 invaded lymph nodes (p = 0.001), N1 lymph node stage (p = 0.009). Extensive lymphadenectomy would not provide any benefit in terms of survival compared to simple pelvic lymph node dissection (p = 0.8). Common iliac node invasion appears to be a factor of poor prognosis when the tumour extends beyond the bladder (> pT3a) (p = 0.018).

Conclusion: In these patients with invasive bladder cancer and lymph node invasion, a number of invaded lymph nodes < or = 2 and local stage < or = pT3a appear to be favourable prognostic factors resulting in a 23.6% remission rate (56.8% when both factors were present simultaneously) after cystectomy plus lymphadenectomy. Extensive lymphadenectomy including the common iliac vessels would not improve survival compared to pelvic lymph node dissection, but nevertheless appears us to be justified, as the presence of common iliac lymph node invasion constitutes a significant and powerful prognostic factor to recommend adjuvant therapy.
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September 2002