Publications by authors named "Alexey A Martyanov"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Platelet function and bleeding at different phases of childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

Sci Rep 2021 04 30;11(1):9401. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology Named After Dmitry Rogachev, Russian Ministry of Healthcare, 1 Samory Mashela Str, Moscow, Russia, 117997.

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is believed to be associated with platelet function defects. However, their mechanisms are poorly understood, in particular with regard to differences between ITP phases, patient age, and therapy. We investigated platelet function and bleeding in children with either persistent or chronic ITP, with or without romiplostim therapy. The study included 151 children with ITP, of whom 56 had disease duration less than 12 months (grouped together as acute/persistent) and 95 were chronic. Samples of 57 healthy children were used as controls, while 5 patients with leukemia, 5 with aplastic anemia, 4 with MYH9-associated thrombocytopenia, and 7 with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome were used as non-ITP thrombocytopenia controls. Whole blood flow cytometry revealed that platelets in both acute/persistent and chronic ITP were increased in size compared with healthy donors. They were also pre-activated as assessed by PAC1, CD62p, cytosolic calcium, and procoagulant platelet levels. This pattern was not observed in other childhood thrombocytopenias. Pre-activation by CD62p was higher in the bleeding group in the chronic ITP cohort only. Romiplostim treatment decreased size and pre-activation of the patient platelets, but not calcium. Our data suggest that increased size, pre-activation, and cytosolic calcium are common for all ITP platelets, but their association with bleeding could depend on the disease phase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-88900-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8087794PMC
April 2021

Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides on platelet function: inhibition of weak platelet activation.

Sci Rep 2020 07 23;10(1):12296. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Center for Theoretical Problems of Physico-Chemical Pharmacology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 30 Srednyaya Kalitnikovskaya str., Moscow, 109029, Russia.

Platelets are anucleate blood cells with reported roles in hemostasis and immune responses, which possess a functional receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the well-known inducers of inflammation. However, LPSs effects on platelets are contradictory. Here we aim to investigate mechanisms of platelet functioning in the presence of LPS and to find the cause of the discrepancy in the previously published data. Cell activity was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blotting, and aggregometry. Thrombus growth was assessed by fluorescent microscopy. LPS' activity was checked by their capability to induce PMN activation. However, LPSs did not substantially affect either thrombus growth in flow chambers, irreversible platelet aggregation, or platelet responses to strong activation. Platelet aggregation in response to 1 μM of ADP was significantly inhibited by LPSs. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that platelet activation responses to weak stimulation were also diminished by LPSs, while VASP phosphorylation was weakly increased. Additionally, LPSs were capable of inhibition of ADP-induced P2-receptor desensitization. Incubation of platelets with a pan-PDE inhibitor IBMX significantly enhanced the LPSs-induced platelet inhibition, implying cAMP/cGMP dependent mechanism. The discrepancy in the previously published data could be explained by LPS-induced weak inhibition of platelet activation and the prevention of platelet desensitization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-69173-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7378070PMC
July 2020

Development of a Simple Kinetic Mathematical Model of Aggregation of Particles or Clustering of Receptors.

Life (Basel) 2020 Jun 26;10(6). Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 1/2 Leninskie gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia.

The process of clustering of plasma membrane receptors in response to their agonist is the first step in signal transduction. The rate of the clustering process and the size of the clusters determine further cell responses. Here we aim to demonstrate that a simple 2-differential equation mathematical model is capable of quantitative description of the kinetics of 2D or 3D cluster formation in various processes. Three mathematical models based on mass action kinetics were considered and compared with each other by their ability to describe experimental data on GPVI or CR3 receptor clustering (2D) and albumin or platelet aggregation (3D) in response to activation. The models were able to successfully describe experimental data without losing accuracy after switching between complex and simple models. However, additional restrictions on parameter values are required to match a single set of parameters for the given experimental data. The extended clustering model captured several properties of the kinetics of cluster formation, such as the existence of only three typical steady states for this system: unclustered receptors, receptor dimers, and clusters. Therefore, a simple kinetic mass-action-law-based model could be utilized to adequately describe clustering in response to activation both in 2D and in 3D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life10060097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7345685PMC
June 2020

Control of Platelet CLEC-2-Mediated Activation by Receptor Clustering and Tyrosine Kinase Signaling.

Biophys J 2020 06 29;118(11):2641-2655. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Center for Theoretical Problems of Physico-chemical Pharmacology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia; Dmitry Rogachev National Medical Research Centre of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia; Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia; Department of Normal Physiology, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

Platelets are blood cells responsible for vascular integrity preservation. The activation of platelet receptor C-type lectin-like receptor II-type (CLEC-2) could partially mediate the latter function. Although this receptor is considered to be of importance for hemostasis, the rate-limiting steps of CLEC-2-induced platelet activation are not clear. Here, we aimed to investigate CLEC-2-induced platelet signal transduction using computational modeling in combination with experimental approaches. We developed a stochastic multicompartmental computational model of CLEC-2 signaling. The model described platelet activation beginning with CLEC-2 receptor clustering, followed by Syk and Src family kinase phosphorylation, determined by the cluster size. Active Syk mediated linker adaptor for T cell protein phosphorylation and membrane signalosome formation, which resulted in the activation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, phospholipase and phosphoinositide-3-kinase, calcium, and phosphoinositide signaling. The model parameters were assessed from published experimental data. Flow cytometry, total internal reflection fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and western blotting quantification of the protein phosphorylation were used for the assessment of the experimental dynamics of CLEC-2-induced platelet activation. Analysis of the model revealed that the CLEC-2 receptor clustering leading to the membrane-based signalosome formation is a critical element required for the accurate description of the experimental data. Both receptor clustering and signalosome formation are among the rate-limiting steps of CLEC-2-mediated platelet activation. In agreement with these predictions, the CLEC-2-induced platelet activation, but not activation mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors, was strongly dependent on temperature conditions and cholesterol depletion. Besides, the model predicted that CLEC-2-induced platelet activation results in cytosolic calcium spiking, which was confirmed by single-platelet total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging. Our results suggest a refined picture of the platelet signal transduction network associated with CLEC-2. We show that tyrosine kinase activation is not the only rate-limiting step in CLEC-2-induced activation of platelets. Translocation of receptor-agonist complexes to the signaling region and linker adaptor for T cell signalosome formation in this region are limiting CLEC-2-induced activation as well.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2020.04.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7264845PMC
June 2020

Heterogeneity of Integrin αβ Function in Pediatric Immune Thrombocytopenia Revealed by Continuous Flow Cytometry Analysis.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Apr 25;21(9). Epub 2020 Apr 25.

National Medical Research Centеr of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology named after Dmitry Rogachev, 1 Samory Mashela St, Moscow 117198, Russia.

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune condition primarily induced by the loss of immune tolerance to the platelet glycoproteins. Here we develop a novel flow cytometry approach to analyze integrin αβ functioning in ITP in comparison with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) (negative control) and healthy pediatric donors (positive control). Continuous flow cytometry of Fura-Red-loaded platelets from whole hirudinated blood was used for the characterization of platelet responses to conventional activators. Calcium levels and fibrinogen binding were normalized to ionomycin-induced responses. Ex vivo thrombus formation on collagen was observed in parallel-plate flow chambers. Platelets from all ITP patients had significantly higher cytosolic calcium concentration in the quiescent state compared to healthy donors (15 ± 5 nM vs. 8 ± 5 nM), but calcium increases in response to all activators were normal. Clustering analysis revealed two subpopulations of ITP patients: the subgroup with high fibrinogen binding (HFB), and the subgroup with low fibrinogen binding (LFB) (8% ± 5% for LFB vs. 16% ± 3% for healthy donors in response to ADP). GT platelets had calcium mobilization (81 ± 23 nM), fibrinogen binding (5.1% ± 0.3%) and thrombus growth comparable to the LFB subgroup. Computational modeling suggested phospholipase C-dependent platelet pre-activation for the HFB subgroup and lower levels of functional integrin molecules for the LFB group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246588PMC
April 2020

Quantitative dynamics of reversible platelet aggregation: mathematical modelling and experiments.

Sci Rep 2019 04 17;9(1):6217. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 1/2 Leninskie gory, Moscow, 119991, Russia.

Although reversible platelet aggregation observed in response to ADP stimulation in the presence of calcium is a well-known phenomenon, its mechanisms are not entirely clear. To study them, we developed a simple kinetic mass-action-law-based mathematical model to use it in combination with experiments. Light transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA) induced by ADP was performed for platelet-rich plasma or washed platelets using both conventional light transmission and aggregate size monitoring method based on optical density fluctuations. Parameter values of the model were determined by means of parameter estimation techniques implemented in COPASI software. The mathematical model was able to describe reversible platelet aggregation LTA curves without assuming changes in platelet aggregation parameters over time, but with the assumption that platelet can enter the aggregate only once. In the model, the mean size of platelet aggregates correlated with the solution transparency. This corresponded with flow cytometry analysis and with optical density fluctuations data on aggregate size. The predicted values of model parameters correlated with ADP concentration used in experiments. These data suggest that, at the start of the aggregation, when platelet integrins switch "on", large unstable platelet aggregates are rapidly formed, which leads to an increase in light transmission. However, upon fragmentation of these aggregates, the probability of the post-aggregate platelets' attachment to each other decreases preventing new aggregation and resulting in the reversible aggregation phenomenon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42701-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470167PMC
April 2019
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