Publications by authors named "Alexandra Shilen"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

SARS-CoV-2 infection and subsequent changes in the menstrual cycle among participants in the Arizona CoVHORT study.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2021 Sep 20. Epub 2021 Sep 20.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; The University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine-Tucson, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2021.09.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8452349PMC
September 2021

Design of the Arizona CoVHORT: A Population-Based COVID-19 Cohort.

Front Public Health 2021 10;9:620060. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States.

This study is a prospective, population-based cohort of individuals with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection and those without past infection through multiple recruitment sources. The main study goal is to track health status over time, within the diverse populations of Arizona and to identify the long-term consequences of COVID-19 on health and well-being. A total of 2,881 study participants (16.2% with a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection) have been enrolled as of December 22, 2020, with a target enrollment of 10,000 participants and a planned follow-up of at least 2 years. This manuscript describes a scalable study design that utilizes a wide range of recruitment sources, leveraging electronic data collection to capture and link longitudinal participant data on the current and emerging issues associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The cohort is built within a collaborative infrastructure that includes new and established partnerships with multiple stakeholders, including the state's public universities, local health departments, tribes, and tribal organizations. Challenges remain for ensuring recruitment of diverse participants and participant retention, although the electronic data management system and timing of participant contact can help to mitigate these problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2021.620060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902773PMC
March 2021

Training and Incorporating Students in SARS-CoV-2 Case Investigations and Contact Tracing.

Public Health Rep 2021 Mar-Apr;136(2):154-160. Epub 2020 Dec 10.

572170 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Objectives: In June 2020, Arizona had the fastest-growing number of cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide. As part of the growing public health response, the University of Arizona Student Aid for Field Epidemiology Response (SAFER) team was able to modify and increase case investigation efforts to assist local health departments. We outline the recommended logistical and management steps to include students in a public health response of this scope.

Methods: From April 1 through September 1, 2020, the SAFER team identified key components of a successful student team response: volunteer training, management that allows more senior students to manage newer students, adoption of case-management software, and use of an online survey platform for students to conduct interviews consistently and allow for data quality control and management.

Results: From April 1 through September 1, 2020, SAFER worked with 3 local health departments to complete 1910 COVID-19 case investigations through a virtual call center. A total of 233 volunteers and 46 hourly student workers and staff members were involved. As of September 2020, students were completing >150 interviews per week, including contact-tracing efforts.

Practice Implications: Developing relationships between applied public health and academic programs can relieve the burden of low-risk, high-volume case investigations at local and state health departments. Furthermore, by establishing a virtual call center, health sciences faculty and students can volunteer remotely during a pandemic with no additional risk of infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033354920974664DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8093843PMC
February 2021
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