Publications by authors named "Alexandra D Holland"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A step beyond BRET: Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL).

J Vis Exp 2014 May 23(87). Epub 2014 May 23.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur;

Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL) is a radiative excitation-emission process that produces increased signal and contrast enhancement in vitro and in vivo. FUEL shares many of the same underlying principles as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET), yet greatly differs in the acceptable working distances between the luminescent source and the fluorescent entity. While BRET is effectively limited to a maximum of 2 times the Förster radius, commonly less than 14 nm, FUEL can occur at distances up to µm or even cm in the absence of an optical absorber. Here we expand upon the foundation and applicability of FUEL by reviewing the relevant principles behind the phenomenon and demonstrate its compatibility with a wide variety of fluorophores and fluorescent nanoparticles. Further, the utility of antibody-targeted FUEL is explored. The examples shown here provide evidence that FUEL can be utilized for applications where BRET is not possible, filling the spatial void that exists between BRET and traditional whole animal imaging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/51549DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4207116PMC
May 2014

In vitro characterization of Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence: broadening the scope of energy transfer.

Methods 2014 Mar 14;66(2):353-61. Epub 2013 Sep 14.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr. Roux, 75724 Paris cedex 15, France. Electronic address:

Energy transfer mechanisms represent the basis for an array of valuable tools to infer interactions in vitro and in vivo, enhance detection or resolve interspecies distances such as with resonance. Based upon our own previously published studies and new results shown here we present a novel framework describing for the first time a model giving a view of the biophysical relationship between Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL), a conventional radiative excitation-emission process, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. We show here that in homogeneous solutions and in fluorophore-targeted bacteria, FUEL is the dominant mechanism responsible for the production of red-shifted photons. The minor resonance contribution was ascertained by comparing the intensity of the experimental signal to its theoretical resonance counterpart. Distinctive features of the in vitro FUEL signal include a macroscopic depth dependency, a lack of enhancement upon targeting at a constant fluorophore concentration cf and a non-square dependency on cf. Significantly, FUEL is an important, so far overlooked, component of all resonance phenomena which should guide the design of appropriate controls when elucidating interactions. Last, our results highlight the potential for FUEL as a means to enhance in vivo and in vitro detection through complex media while alleviating the need for targeting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2013.09.005DOI Listing
March 2014

Intrinsic autotrophic biomass yield and productivity in algae: modeling spectral and mixing-rate dependence.

Biotechnol J 2011 May 7;6(5):584-99. Epub 2011 Mar 7.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84604, USA.

For non-inhibitory irradiances, the rate of algal biomass synthesis was modeled as the product of the algal autotrophic yield Φ(DW) and the flux of photons absorbed by the culture, as described using Beer-Lambert law. As a contrast to earlier attempts, the use of scatter-corrected extinction coefficients enabled the validation of such approach, which bypasses determination of photosynthesis-irradiance (PI) kinetic parameters. The broad misconception that PI curves, or the equivalent use of specific growth rate expressions independent of the biomass concentration, can be extended to adequately model biomass production under light-limitation is addressed. For inhibitory irradiances, a proposed mechanistic model, based on the photosynthetic units (PSU) concept, allows one to estimate a target speed νT across the photic zone in order to limit the flux of photons per cell to levels averting significant reductions in Φ(DW) . These modeled target speeds, on the order of 5-20 m s(-1) for high outdoor irradiances, call for fundamental changes in reactor design to optimize biomass productivity. The presented analysis enables a straightforward bioreactor parameterization, which, in-turn, guides the establishment of conditions ensuring maximum productivity and complete nutrients consumption. Additionally, solar and fluorescent lighting spectra were used to calculate energy to photon-counts conversion factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biot.201000261DOI Listing
May 2011

Intrinsic autotrophic biomass yield and productivity in algae: experimental methods for strain selection.

Biotechnol J 2011 May 7;6(5):572-83. Epub 2011 Mar 7.

Faculty of Life-Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Using an analogy with fed-batch heterotrophic growth, the algal photoautotrophic yield Φ(DW) (in grams of dry weight biomass synthesized per micromole of absorbed photons) was derived from the algae batch growth behavior in nutrient-replete medium. At known levels of incident light, the yield Φ(DW) enables the estimate of a maximum productivity, and is therefore critical to compare and select algal cultures and growth conditions for large-scale production. The algal culture maximum growth rate was shown to be an unreliable indicator of autotrophic biomass yield. The developed carbonate addition method (carbonate addition, neutralization, and sealing) alleviated carbon limitations otherwise seen in aerated batch cultures, leading to two to five fold higher yield estimates. The fully defined FLX growth medium with variable ionic strengths (FLX1-100) supported excellent growth in most cultures tested. The chosen experimental methods and versatile FLX medium proved well-suited for small sample volumes and a high number of samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biot.201000260DOI Listing
May 2011

Development of a defined medium supporting rapid growth for Deinococcus radiodurans and analysis of metabolic capacities.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2006 Oct 31;72(5):1074-82. Epub 2006 Mar 31.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2180, USA.

A morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS)-buffered rich defined medium (RDM) was optimized to support a reproducible 2.6-h doubling time at 35 degrees C for Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and used to gain insight into vitamin and carbon metabolism. D. radiodurans was shown to require biotin and niacin for growth in this medium. A glutamine-serine simple defined medium (SDM) was developed that supported a 4-h doubling time, and this medium was used to probe sulfur and methionine metabolism. Vitamin B(12) was shown to alleviate methionine auxotrophy, and under these conditions, sulfate was used as the sole sulfur source. Phenotypic characterization of a methionine synthase deletion mutant demonstrated that the B(12) alleviation of methionine auxotrophy was due to the necessity of the B(12)-dependent methionine synthase in methionine biosynthesis. Growth on ammonium as the sole nitrogen source in the presence of vitamin B(12) was demonstrated, but it was not possible to achieve reproducibly good growth in the absence of at least one amino acid as a nitrogen source. Growth on sulfate, cysteine, and methionine as sulfur sources demonstrated the function of a complete sulfur recycling pathway in this strain. These studies have demonstrated that rapid growth of D. radiodurans R1 can be achieved in a MOPS-based medium solely containing a carbon source, salts, four vitamins, and two amino acids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-006-0399-1DOI Listing
October 2006
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