Publications by authors named "Alexander P A Stegmann"

51 Publications

Genotype-phenotype correlations and novel molecular insights into the DHX30-associated neurodevelopmental disorders.

Genome Med 2021 05 21;13(1):90. Epub 2021 May 21.

Département de Génétique, Hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Background: We aimed to define the clinical and variant spectrum and to provide novel molecular insights into the DHX30-associated neurodevelopmental disorder.

Methods: Clinical and genetic data from affected individuals were collected through Facebook-based family support group, GeneMatcher, and our network of collaborators. We investigated the impact of novel missense variants with respect to ATPase and helicase activity, stress granule (SG) formation, global translation, and their effect on embryonic development in zebrafish. SG formation was additionally analyzed in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated DHX30-deficient HEK293T and zebrafish models, along with in vivo behavioral assays.

Results: We identified 25 previously unreported individuals, ten of whom carry novel variants, two of which are recurrent, and provide evidence of gonadal mosaicism in one family. All 19 individuals harboring heterozygous missense variants within helicase core motifs (HCMs) have global developmental delay, intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, and gait abnormalities. These variants impair the ATPase and helicase activity of DHX30, trigger SG formation, interfere with global translation, and cause developmental defects in a zebrafish model. Notably, 4 individuals harboring heterozygous variants resulting either in haploinsufficiency or truncated proteins presented with a milder clinical course, similar to an individual harboring a de novo mosaic HCM missense variant. Functionally, we established DHX30 as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and as an evolutionary conserved factor in SG assembly. Based on the clinical course, the variant location, and type we establish two distinct clinical subtypes. DHX30 loss-of-function variants cause a milder phenotype whereas a severe phenotype is caused by HCM missense variants that, in addition to the loss of ATPase and helicase activity, lead to a detrimental gain-of-function with respect to SG formation. Behavioral characterization of dhx30-deficient zebrafish revealed altered sleep-wake activity and social interaction, partially resembling the human phenotype.

Conclusions: Our study highlights the usefulness of social media to define novel Mendelian disorders and exemplifies how functional analyses accompanied by clinical and genetic findings can define clinically distinct subtypes for ultra-rare disorders. Such approaches require close interdisciplinary collaboration between families/legal representatives of the affected individuals, clinicians, molecular genetics diagnostic laboratories, and research laboratories.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-021-00900-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8140440PMC
May 2021

Diagnostic exome-based preconception carrier testing in consanguineous couples: results from the first 100 couples in clinical practice.

Genet Med 2021 06 19;23(6):1125-1136. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht University Medical Center+ (MUMC+), Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Consanguineous couples are at increased risk of being heterozygous for the same autosomal recessive (AR) disorder(s), with a 25% risk of affected offspring as a consequence. Until recently, comprehensive preconception carrier testing (PCT) for AR disorders was unavailable in routine diagnostics. Here we developed and implemented such a test in routine clinical care.

Methods: We performed exome sequencing (ES) for 100 consanguineous couples. For each couple, rare variants that could give rise to biallelic variants in offspring were selected. These variants were subsequently filtered against a gene panel consisting of ~2,000 genes associated with known AR disorders (OMIM-based). Remaining variants were classified according to American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics/Association for Molecular Pathology (ACMG/AMP) guidelines, after which only likely pathogenic and pathogenic (class IV/V) variants, present in both partners, were reported.

Results: In 28 of 100 tested consanguineous couples (28%), likely pathogenic and pathogenic variants not previously known in the couple or their family were reported conferring 25% risk of affected offspring.

Conclusion: ES-based PCT provides a powerful diagnostic tool to identify AR disease carrier status in consanguineous couples. Outcomes provided significant reproductive choices for a higher proportion of these couples than previous tests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01116-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8187149PMC
June 2021

SPEN haploinsufficiency causes a neurodevelopmental disorder overlapping proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome with an episignature of X chromosomes in females.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 03 16;108(3):502-516. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Deletion 1p36 (del1p36) syndrome is the most common human disorder resulting from a terminal autosomal deletion. This condition is molecularly and clinically heterogeneous. Deletions involving two non-overlapping regions, known as the distal (telomeric) and proximal (centromeric) critical regions, are sufficient to cause the majority of the recurrent clinical features, although with different facial features and dysmorphisms. SPEN encodes a transcriptional repressor commonly deleted in proximal del1p36 syndrome and is located centromeric to the proximal 1p36 critical region. Here, we used clinical data from 34 individuals with truncating variants in SPEN to define a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with features that overlap considerably with those of proximal del1p36 syndrome. The clinical profile of this disease includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, aggressive behavior, attention deficit disorder, hypotonia, brain and spine anomalies, congenital heart defects, high/narrow palate, facial dysmorphisms, and obesity/increased BMI, especially in females. SPEN also emerges as a relevant gene for del1p36 syndrome by co-expression analyses. Finally, we show that haploinsufficiency of SPEN is associated with a distinctive DNA methylation episignature of the X chromosome in affected females, providing further evidence of a specific contribution of the protein to the epigenetic control of this chromosome, and a paradigm of an X chromosome-specific episignature that classifies syndromic traits. We conclude that SPEN is required for multiple developmental processes and SPEN haploinsufficiency is a major contributor to a disorder associated with deletions centromeric to the previously established 1p36 critical regions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008487PMC
March 2021

Mutation-specific pathophysiological mechanisms define different neurodevelopmental disorders associated with SATB1 dysfunction.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 02 28;108(2):346-356. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Rehabilitation and Development, Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Portland, OR 97227, USA.

Whereas large-scale statistical analyses can robustly identify disease-gene relationships, they do not accurately capture genotype-phenotype correlations or disease mechanisms. We use multiple lines of independent evidence to show that different variant types in a single gene, SATB1, cause clinically overlapping but distinct neurodevelopmental disorders. Clinical evaluation of 42 individuals carrying SATB1 variants identified overt genotype-phenotype relationships, associated with different pathophysiological mechanisms, established by functional assays. Missense variants in the CUT1 and CUT2 DNA-binding domains result in stronger chromatin binding, increased transcriptional repression, and a severe phenotype. In contrast, variants predicted to result in haploinsufficiency are associated with a milder clinical presentation. A similarly mild phenotype is observed for individuals with premature protein truncating variants that escape nonsense-mediated decay, which are transcriptionally active but mislocalized in the cell. Our results suggest that in-depth mutation-specific genotype-phenotype studies are essential to capture full disease complexity and to explain phenotypic variability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895900PMC
February 2021

Histone H3.3 beyond cancer: Germline mutations in cause a previously unidentified neurodegenerative disorder in 46 patients.

Sci Adv 2020 Dec 2;6(49). Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Institut für Neurogenomik, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany.

Although somatic mutations in Histone 3.3 (H3.3) are well-studied drivers of oncogenesis, the role of germline mutations remains unreported. We analyze 46 patients bearing de novo germline mutations in histone 3 family 3A () or with progressive neurologic dysfunction and congenital anomalies without malignancies. Molecular modeling of all 37 variants demonstrated clear disruptions in interactions with DNA, other histones, and histone chaperone proteins. Patient histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) analysis revealed notably aberrant local PTM patterns distinct from the somatic lysine mutations that cause global PTM dysregulation. RNA sequencing on patient cells demonstrated up-regulated gene expression related to mitosis and cell division, and cellular assays confirmed an increased proliferative capacity. A zebrafish model showed craniofacial anomalies and a defect in Foxd3-derived glia. These data suggest that the mechanism of germline mutations are distinct from cancer-associated somatic histone mutations but may converge on control of cell proliferation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abc9207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7821880PMC
December 2020

Germline AGO2 mutations impair RNA interference and human neurological development.

Nat Commun 2020 11 16;11(1):5797. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Department of Genetics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ARGONAUTE-2 and associated miRNAs form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which targets mRNAs for translational silencing and degradation as part of the RNA interference pathway. Despite the essential nature of this process for cellular function, there is little information on the role of RISC components in human development and organ function. We identify 13 heterozygous mutations in AGO2 in 21 patients affected by disturbances in neurological development. Each of the identified single amino acid mutations result in impaired shRNA-mediated silencing. We observe either impaired RISC formation or increased binding of AGO2 to mRNA targets as mutation specific functional consequences. The latter is supported by decreased phosphorylation of a C-terminal serine cluster involved in mRNA target release, increased formation of dendritic P-bodies in neurons and global transcriptome alterations in patient-derived primary fibroblasts. Our data emphasize the importance of gene expression regulation through the dynamic AGO2-RNA association for human neuronal development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19572-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670403PMC
November 2020

The adult phenotype of Schaaf-Yang syndrome.

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2020 10 19;15(1):294. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.

Background: MAGEL2-associated Schaaf-Yang syndrome (SHFYNG, OMIM #615547, ORPHA: 398069), which was identified in 2013, is a rare disorder caused by truncating variants of the paternal copy of MAGEL2, which is localized in the imprinted region on 15q11.2q13. The phenotype of SHFYNG in childhood partially overlaps with that of the well-established Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS, OMIM #176270). While larger numbers of younger individuals with SHFYNG have been recently published, the phenotype in adulthood is not well established. We recruited 7 adult individuals (aged 18 to 36) with molecularly confirmed SHFYNG and collected data regarding the clinical profile including eating habits, sleep, behavior, personal autonomy, psychiatric abnormalities and other medical conditions, as well as information about the respective phenotypes in childhood.

Results: Within our small cohort, we identified a range of common features, such as disturbed sleep, hypoactivity, social withdrawal and anxiety, but also noted considerable differences at the level of personal autonomy and skills. Behavioral problems were frequent, and a majority of individuals displayed weight gain and food-seeking behavior, along with mild intellectual disability or borderline intellectual function. Classical symptoms of SHFYNG in childhood were reported for most individuals.

Conclusion: Our findings indicate a high variability of the functional abilities and social participation of adults with SHFYNG. A high prevalence of obesity within our cohort was notable, and uncontrollable food intake was a major concern for some caregivers. The phenotypes of PWS and SHFYNG in adulthood might be more difficult to discern than the phenotypes in childhood. Molecular genetic testing for SHFYNG should therefore be considered in adults with the suspected diagnosis of PWS, if testing for PWS has been negative.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-020-01557-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574436PMC
October 2020

De novo variants in MPP5 cause global developmental delay and behavioral changes.

Hum Mol Genet 2020 12;29(20):3388-3401

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Membrane Protein Palmitoylated 5 (MPP5) is a highly conserved apical complex protein essential for cell polarity, fate and survival. Defects in cell polarity are associated with neurologic disorders including autism and microcephaly. MPP5 is essential for neurogenesis in animal models, but human variants leading to neurologic impairment have not been described. We identified three patients with heterozygous MPP5 de novo variants (DNV) and global developmental delay (GDD) and compared their phenotypes and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain how MPP5 DNV leads to GDD. All three patients with MPP5 DNV experienced GDD with language delay/regression and behavioral changes. MRI ranged from normal to decreased gyral folding and microcephaly. The effects of MPP5 depletion on the developing brain were assessed by creating a heterozygous conditional knock out (het CKO) murine model with central nervous system (CNS)-specific Nestin-Cre drivers. In the het CKO model, Mpp5 depletion led to microcephaly, decreased cerebellar volume and cortical thickness. Het CKO mice had decreased ependymal cells and Mpp5 at the apical surface of cortical ventricular zone compared with wild type. Het CKO mice also failed to maintain progenitor pools essential for neurogenesis. The proportion of cortical cells undergoing apoptotic cell death increased, suggesting that cell death reduces progenitor population and neuron number. Het CKO mice also showed behavioral changes, similar to our patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that variants in MPP5 are associated with GDD, behavioral abnormalities and language regression/delay. Murine modeling shows that neurogenesis is likely altered in these individuals, with cell death and skewed cellular composition playing significant roles.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddaa224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7906781PMC
December 2020

Distinguishing Marshall from Stickler syndrome: a clinical and genetic challenge.

Clin Dysmorphol 2021 Jan;30(1):58-61

Clinical Genetics and GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCD.0000000000000346DOI Listing
January 2021

Acute encephalopathy after head trauma in a patient with a RHOBTB2 mutation.

Neurol Genet 2020 Jun 1;6(3):e418. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Department of Neurology (A.C.S.K., J.N.), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht; Department of Pediatrics (L.A.B.), Màxima Medical Center, Veldhoven; and Department of Clinical Genetics (A.B., A.P.A.S., M.S., M.V.), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Objective: De novo missense mutations in the gene have been described as causative for developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Methods: The clinical phenotype of this disorder includes early-onset epilepsy, severe intellectual disability, postnatal microcephaly, and movement disorder. Three patients have been described with acute encephalopathy and febrile epileptic status. All showed severe EEG abnormalities during this episode and abnormal MRI with hemisphere swelling or reduced diffusion in various brain regions.

Results: We describe the episode of acute encephalopathy after head trauma in a 5-year-old RHOBTB2 patient. At admission, Glasgow coma scale score was E4M4V1. EEG was severely abnormal showing a noncontinuous pattern with slow activity without epileptic activity indicating severe encephalopathy. A second EEG on day 8 was still severely slowed and showed focal delta activity frontotemporal in both hemispheres. Gradually, he recovered, and on day 11, he had regained his normal reactivity, behavior, and mood. Two months after discharge, EEG showed further decrease in slow activity and increase in normal electroencephalographic activity. After discharge, parents noted that he showed more hyperkinetic movements compared to before this period of encephalopathy. Follow-up MRI showed an increment of hippocampal atrophy. In addition, we summarize the clinical characteristics of a second RHOBTB2 patient with increase of focal periventricular atrophy and development of hemiparesis after epileptic status.

Conclusions: Acute encephalopathy in RHOBTB2 patients can also be triggered by head trauma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/NXG.0000000000000418DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164965PMC
June 2020

Genetic analysis of spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord: a case series.

BMC Neurol 2020 Apr 6;20(1):121. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Background: Spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord is better known as herniated spinal cord. There are many arguments in favour of considering it a developmental defect. From this point of view, it is a type of neural tube disorder. Neural tube disorders can be caused by multiple factors, including a genetic factor. A common genetic defect in patients with a spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth of the spinal cord is sought for.

Case Presentation: In two patients with a symptomatic lesion and referred to an academic hospital a genetic analysis was performed after informed consent. Whole-exome analysis was performed. : Whole-exome analysis did not result in identification of a clinically relevant genetic variant.

Conclusions: This the first study to investigate the genetic contribution to spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord. We could not establish a genetic cause for this entity. This conclusion cannot be definitive due to the small sample size. However, the incidental occurrence, the lack of reports of inheritance of this disorder and the absence of contribution to syndromal disorders favours a defect of normal development of the spinal cord.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-020-01710-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7132931PMC
April 2020

Pathogenic variants in cause a genetic disorder characterised by developmental delay/intellectual disability and a spectrum of neurobehavioural phenotypes including autism and ADHD.

J Med Genet 2020 10 9;57(10):717-724. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.

Background: Rare variants in hundreds of genes have been implicated in developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID) and neurobehavioural phenotypes. encodes a protein important for RNA silencing. Heterozygous truncating variants have been reported in three patients from large cohorts with autism, but no full phenotypic characterisation was described.

Methods: Clinical and molecular characterisation was performed on 17 patients with variants. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective chart review, parent interviews, direct patient interaction with providers and formal neuropsychological evaluation.

Results: Clinical findings included DD/ID (17/17) (speech delay in 94% (16/17), fine motor delay in 82% (14/17) and gross motor delay in 71% (12/17) of subjects), autism or autistic traits (13/17), attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (11/17), other behavioural problems (7/17) and musculoskeletal findings (12/17). Other congenital malformations or clinical findings were occasionally documented. The majority of patients exhibited some dysmorphic features but no recognisable gestalt was identified. 17 heterozygous variants were identified in 12 male and five female unrelated subjects by exome sequencing (14), a targeted panel (2) and a chromosomal microarray (1). The variants were nonsense (7), frameshift (5), splice site (2), intragenic deletions (2) and missense (1).

Conclusions: Variants in cause a novel genetic disorder characterised by recurrent neurocognitive and behavioural phenotypes featuring DD/ID, autism, ADHD and other behavioural abnormalities. Our data highly suggest that haploinsufficiency is the most likely pathogenic mechanism. should be added to the growing list of genes of the RNA-induced silencing complex associated with ID/DD, autism and ADHD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106470DOI Listing
October 2020

Disruptive mutations in TANC2 define a neurodevelopmental syndrome associated with psychiatric disorders.

Nat Commun 2019 10 15;10(1):4679. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Postsynaptic density (PSD) proteins have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Here, we present detailed clinical and genetic data for 20 patients with likely gene-disrupting mutations in TANC2-whose protein product interacts with multiple PSD proteins. Pediatric patients with disruptive mutations present with autism, intellectual disability, and delayed language and motor development. In addition to a variable degree of epilepsy and facial dysmorphism, we observe a pattern of more complex psychiatric dysfunction or behavioral problems in adult probands or carrier parents. Although this observation requires replication to establish statistical significance, it also suggests that mutations in this gene are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders consistent with its postsynaptic function. We find that TANC2 is expressed broadly in the human developing brain, especially in excitatory neurons and glial cells, but shows a more restricted pattern in Drosophila glial cells where its disruption affects behavioral outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12435-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6794285PMC
October 2019

Disruptive variants of associate with autism and interfere with neuronal development and synaptic transmission.

Sci Adv 2019 09 25;5(9):eaax2166. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Center for Medical Genetics and Hunan Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China.

RNA binding proteins are key players in posttranscriptional regulation and have been implicated in neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we report a significant burden of heterozygous, likely gene-disrupting variants in (encoding a highly constrained RNA binding protein) among patients with autism and related neurodevelopmental disabilities. Analysis of 17 patients identifies common phenotypes including autism, intellectual disability, language and motor delay, seizures, macrocephaly, and variable ocular abnormalities. HITS-CLIP revealed that Csde1-binding targets are enriched in autism-associated gene sets, especially FMRP targets, and in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity-related pathways. Csde1 knockdown in primary mouse cortical neurons leads to an overgrowth of the neurites and abnormal dendritic spine morphology/synapse formation and impaired synaptic transmission, whereas mutant and knockdown experiments in result in defects in synapse growth and synaptic transmission. Our study defines a new autism-related syndrome and highlights the functional role of CSDE1 in synapse development and synaptic transmission.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aax2166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6760934PMC
September 2019

Mutations in RPSA and NKX2-3 link development of the spleen and intestinal vasculature.

Hum Mutat 2020 01 23;41(1):196-202. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Department of Clinical Genetics and GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Idiopathic intestinal varicosis is a developmental disorder defined by dilated and convoluted submucosal veins in the colon or small bowel. A limited number of families with idiopathic intestinal varices has been reported, but the genetic cause has not yet been identified. We performed whole-exome and targeted Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in five intestinal varicosis families. In four families, mutations in the RPSA gene were found, a gene previously linked to congenital asplenia. Individuals in these pedigrees had intestinal varicose veins and angiodysplasia, often in combination with asplenia. In a further four-generation pedigree that only showed intestinal varicosities, the RPSA gene was normal. Instead, a nonsense mutation in the homeobox gene NKX2-3 was detected which cosegregated with the disease in this large family with a LOD (logarithm of the odds) score of 3.3. NKX2-3 is a component of a molecular pathway underlying spleen and gut vasculature development in mice. Our results provide a molecular basis for familial idiopathic intestinal varices. We provide evidence for a relationship between the molecular pathways underlying the development of the spleen and intestinal mucosal vasculature that is conserved between humans and mice. We propose that clinical management of intestinal varices, should include assessment of a functional spleen.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6972609PMC
January 2020

Correction: The ARID1B spectrum in 143 patients: from nonsyndromic intellectual disability to Coffin-Siris syndrome.

Genet Med 2019 Sep;21(9):2160-2161

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of the author Pleuntje J. van der Sluijs, which was incorrectly given as Eline (P. J.) van der Sluijs. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-018-0368-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6752317PMC
September 2019

De novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability with behavioral problems and dysmorphisms.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 05 24;27(5):738-746. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Human Genetics, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Determining pathogenicity of genomic variation identified by next-generation sequencing techniques can be supported by recurrent disruptive variants in the same gene in phenotypically similar individuals. However, interpretation of novel variants in a specific gene in individuals with mild-moderate intellectual disability (ID) without recognizable syndromic features can be challenging and reverse phenotyping is often required. We describe 24 individuals with a de novo disease-causing variant in, or partial deletion of, the F-box only protein 11 gene (FBXO11, also known as VIT1 and PRMT9). FBXO11 is part of the SCF (SKP1-cullin-F-box) complex, a multi-protein E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex catalyzing the ubiquitination of proteins destined for proteasomal degradation. Twenty-two variants were identified by next-generation sequencing, comprising 2 in-frame deletions, 11 missense variants, 1 canonical splice site variant, and 8 nonsense or frameshift variants leading to a truncated protein or degraded transcript. The remaining two variants were identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization and consisted of a partial deletion of FBXO11. All individuals had borderline to severe ID and behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, aggression) were observed in most of them. The most relevant common facial features included a thin upper lip and a broad prominent space between the paramedian peaks of the upper lip. Other features were hypotonia and hyperlaxity of the joints. We show that de novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of ID. The current series show the power of reverse phenotyping in the interpretation of novel genetic variances in individuals who initially did not appear to have a clear recognizable phenotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-018-0292-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462006PMC
May 2019

De Novo Variants in MAPK8IP3 Cause Intellectual Disability with Variable Brain Anomalies.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 02 3;104(2):203-212. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Institute for Clinical Genetics, Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, TU Dresden, Dresden 01307, Germany.

Using exome sequencing, we have identified de novo variants in MAPK8IP3 in 13 unrelated individuals presenting with an overlapping phenotype of mild to severe intellectual disability. The de novo variants comprise six missense variants, three of which are recurrent, and three truncating variants. Brain anomalies such as perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebral or cerebellar atrophy, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum were consistent among individuals harboring recurrent de novo missense variants. MAPK8IP3 has been shown to be involved in the retrograde axonal-transport machinery, but many of its specific functions are yet to be elucidated. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system to target six conserved amino acid positions in Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that two of the six investigated human alterations led to a significantly elevated density of axonal lysosomes, and five variants were associated with adverse locomotion. Reverse-engineering normalized the observed adverse effects back to wild-type levels. Combining genetic, phenotypic, and functional findings, as well as the significant enrichment of de novo variants in MAPK8IP3 within our total cohort of 27,232 individuals who underwent exome sequencing, we implicate de novo variants in MAPK8IP3 as a cause of a neurodevelopmental disorder with intellectual disability and variable brain anomalies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369540PMC
February 2019

CHD3 helicase domain mutations cause a neurodevelopmental syndrome with macrocephaly and impaired speech and language.

Nat Commun 2018 11 5;9(1):4619. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Département de Génétique, Paris, 75013, France.

Chromatin remodeling is of crucial importance during brain development. Pathogenic alterations of several chromatin remodeling ATPases have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. We describe an index case with a de novo missense mutation in CHD3, identified during whole genome sequencing of a cohort of children with rare speech disorders. To gain a comprehensive view of features associated with disruption of this gene, we use a genotype-driven approach, collecting and characterizing 35 individuals with de novo CHD3 mutations and overlapping phenotypes. Most mutations cluster within the ATPase/helicase domain of the encoded protein. Modeling their impact on the three-dimensional structure demonstrates disturbance of critical binding and interaction motifs. Experimental assays with six of the identified mutations show that a subset directly affects ATPase activity, and all but one yield alterations in chromatin remodeling. We implicate de novo CHD3 mutations in a syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, macrocephaly, and impaired speech and language.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06014-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218476PMC
November 2018

The ARID1B spectrum in 143 patients: from nonsyndromic intellectual disability to Coffin-Siris syndrome.

Genet Med 2019 06 8;21(6):1295-1307. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Pathogenic variants in ARID1B are one of the most frequent causes of intellectual disability (ID) as determined by large-scale exome sequencing studies. Most studies published thus far describe clinically diagnosed Coffin-Siris patients (ARID1B-CSS) and it is unclear whether these data are representative for patients identified through sequencing of unbiased ID cohorts (ARID1B-ID). We therefore sought to determine genotypic and phenotypic differences between ARID1B-ID and ARID1B-CSS. In parallel, we investigated the effect of different methods of phenotype reporting.

Methods: Clinicians entered clinical data in an extensive web-based survey.

Results: 79 ARID1B-CSS and 64 ARID1B-ID patients were included. CSS-associated dysmorphic features, such as thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, thick alae nasi, long and/or broad philtrum, small nails and small or absent fifth distal phalanx and hypertrichosis, were observed significantly more often (p < 0.001) in ARID1B-CSS patients. No other significant differences were identified.

Conclusion: There are only minor differences between ARID1B-ID and ARID1B-CSS patients. ARID1B-related disorders seem to consist of a spectrum, and patients should be managed similarly. We demonstrated that data collection methods without an explicit option to report the absence of a feature (such as most Human Phenotype Ontology-based methods) tended to underestimate gene-related features.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-018-0330-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6752273PMC
June 2019

NBEA: Developmental disease gene with early generalized epilepsy phenotypes.

Ann Neurol 2018 11 25;84(5):788-795. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

NBEA is a candidate gene for autism, and de novo variants have been reported in neurodevelopmental disease (NDD) cohorts. However, NBEA has not been rigorously evaluated as a disease gene, and associated phenotypes have not been delineated. We identified 24 de novo NBEA variants in patients with NDD, establishing NBEA as an NDD gene. Most patients had epilepsy with onset in the first few years of life, often characterized by generalized seizure types, including myoclonic and atonic seizures. Our data show a broader phenotypic spectrum than previously described, including a myoclonic-astatic epilepsy-like phenotype in a subset of patients. Ann Neurol 2018;84:796-803.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249120PMC
November 2018

PRRT2-related phenotypes in patients with a 16p11.2 deletion.

Eur J Med Genet 2019 Apr 17;62(4):265-269. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

We studied the presence of benign infantile epilepsy (BIE), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), and PKD with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC) in patients with a 16p11.2 deletion including PRRT2 or with a PRRT2 loss-of-function sequence variant. Index patients were recruited from seven Dutch university hospitals. The presence of BIE, PKD and PKD/IC was retrospectively evaluated using questionnaires and medical records. We included 33 patients with a 16p11.2 deletion: three (9%) had BIE, none had PKD or PKD/IC. Twelve patients had a PRRT2 sequence variant: BIE was present in four (p = 0.069), PKD in six (p < 0.001) and PKD/IC in two (p = 0.067). Most patients with a deletion had undergone genetic testing because of developmental problems (87%), whereas all patients with a sequence variant were tested because of a movement disorder (55%) or epilepsy (45%). BIE, PKD and PKD/IC clearly showed incomplete penetrance in patients with 16p11.2 deletions, but were found in all and 95% of patients with a PRRT2 sequence variant in our study and a large literature cohort, respectively. Deletions and sequence variants have the same underlying loss-of-function disease mechanism. Thus, differences in ascertainment have led to overestimating the frequency of BIE, PKD and PKD/IC in patients with a PRRT2 sequence variant. This has important implications for counseling if genome-wide sequencing shows such variants in patients not presenting the PRRT2-related phenotypes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2018.08.002DOI Listing
April 2019

Loss-of-function zinc finger mutation in the gene associated with erythrocytosis.

Blood 2018 09 15;132(13):1455-1458. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2018-06-854711DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6161772PMC
September 2018

Haploinsufficiency of CUX1 Causes Nonsyndromic Global Developmental Delay With Possible Catch-up Development.

Ann Neurol 2018 08 31;84(2):200-207. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Institute of Human Genetics, University of Leipzig Hospitals and Clinics, Leipzig, Germany.

Objective: Developmental delay (DD) with favorable intellectual outcome and mild intellectual disability (ID) are mostly considered to be of complex genetic and environmental origin, but, in fact, often remain unclear. We aimed at proving our assumption that also mild cases of DD and ID may be of monogenic etiology.

Methods: We clinically evaluated 8 individuals and performed exome sequencing or array copy number analysis and identified variants in CUX1 as the likely cause. In addition, we included a case from the public database, DECIPHER.

Results: All 9 individuals harbored heterozygous null-allele variants in CUX1, encoding the Cut-homeobox 1 transcription factor that is involved in regulation of dendritogenesis and cortical synapse formation in layer II to IV cortical neurons. Six variants arose de novo, while in one family the variant segregated with ID. Of the 9 included individuals, 2 were diagnosed with moderate ID, 3 with mild ID, and 3 showed a normal age-related intelligence at ages 4, 6, and 8 years after a previous history of significant DD.

Interpretation: Our results suggest that null-allele variants, and thus haploinsufficiency of CUX1, cause an isolated phenotype of DD or ID with possible catch-up development. This illustrates that such a developmental course is not necessarily genetic complex, but may also be attributed to a monogenic cause. Ann Neurol 2018;84:200-207.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25278DOI Listing
August 2018

De Novo and Inherited Loss-of-Function Variants in TLK2: Clinical and Genotype-Phenotype Evaluation of a Distinct Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 06 31;102(6):1195-1203. Epub 2018 May 31.

Division of Clinical Genomics, Ambry Genetics, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656, USA.

Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for the discovery of genes related to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Here, we report the identification of a distinct syndrome due to de novo or inherited heterozygous mutations in Tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) in 38 unrelated individuals and two affected mothers, using whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies, matchmaker databases, and international collaborations. Affected individuals had a consistent phenotype, characterized by mild-borderline neurodevelopmental delay (86%), behavioral disorders (68%), severe gastro-intestinal problems (63%), and facial dysmorphism including blepharophimosis (82%), telecanthus (74%), prominent nasal bridge (68%), broad nasal tip (66%), thin vermilion of the upper lip (62%), and upslanting palpebral fissures (55%). Analysis of cell lines from three affected individuals showed that mutations act through a loss-of-function mechanism in at least two case subjects. Genotype-phenotype analysis and comparison of computationally modeled faces showed that phenotypes of these and other individuals with loss-of-function variants significantly overlapped with phenotypes of individuals with other variant types (missense and C-terminal truncating). This suggests that haploinsufficiency of TLK2 is the most likely underlying disease mechanism, leading to a consistent neurodevelopmental phenotype. This work illustrates the power of international data sharing, by the identification of 40 individuals from 26 different centers in 7 different countries, allowing the identification, clinical delineation, and genotype-phenotype evaluation of a distinct NDD caused by mutations in TLK2.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.04.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5992133PMC
June 2018

Functional analysis of a hypomorphic allele shows that MMP14 catalytic activity is the prime determinant of the Winchester syndrome phenotype.

Hum Mol Genet 2018 08;27(16):2775-2788

Institute of Medical Biology (IMB), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 138648, Singapore.

Winchester syndrome (WS, MIM #277950) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive joint destruction and osteolysis. To date, only one missense mutation in MMP14, encoding the membrane-bound matrix metalloprotease 14, has been reported in WS patients. Here, we report a novel hypomorphic MMP14 p.Arg111His (R111H) allele, associated with a mitigated form of WS. Functional analysis demonstrated that this mutation, in contrast to previously reported human and murine MMP14 mutations, does not affect MMP14's transport to the cell membrane. Instead, it partially impairs MMP14's proteolytic activity. This residual activity likely accounts for the mitigated phenotype observed in our patients. Based on our observations as well as previously published data, we hypothesize that MMP14's catalytic activity is the prime determinant of disease severity. Given the limitations of our in vitro assays in addressing the consequences of MMP14 dysfunction, we generated a novel mmp14a/b knockout zebrafish model. The fish accurately reflected key aspects of the WS phenotype including craniofacial malformations, kyphosis, short-stature and reduced bone density owing to defective collagen remodeling. Notably, the zebrafish model will be a valuable tool for developing novel therapeutic approaches to a devastating bone disorder.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddy168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6077784PMC
August 2018

Missense Variants in RHOBTB2 Cause a Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathy in Humans, and Altered Levels Cause Neurological Defects in Drosophila.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 01 21;102(1):44-57. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Institute of Human Genetics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address:

Although the role of typical Rho GTPases and other Rho-linked proteins in synaptic plasticity and cognitive function and dysfunction is widely acknowledged, the role of atypical Rho GTPases (such as RHOBTB2) in neurodevelopment has barely been characterized. We have now identified de novo missense variants clustering in the BTB-domain-encoding region of RHOBTB2 in ten individuals with a similar phenotype, including early-onset epilepsy, severe intellectual disability, postnatal microcephaly, and movement disorders. Three of the variants were recurrent. Upon transfection of HEK293 cells, we found that mutant RHOBTB2 was more abundant than the wild-type, most likely because of impaired degradation in the proteasome. Similarly, elevated amounts of the Drosophila ortholog RhoBTB in vivo were associated with seizure susceptibility and severe locomotor defects. Knockdown of RhoBTB in the Drosophila dendritic arborization neurons resulted in a decreased number of dendrites, thus suggesting a role of RhoBTB in dendritic development. We have established missense variants in the BTB-domain-encoding region of RHOBTB2 as causative for a developmental and epileptic encephalopathy and have elucidated the role of atypical Rho GTPase RhoBTB in Drosophila neurological function and possibly dendrite development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.11.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5777381PMC
January 2018
-->