Publications by authors named "Alexander Milosevic"

9 Publications

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Clinical outcomes of single implant supported crowns versus 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in Dubai Health Authority: a retrospective study.

BMC Oral Health 2021 04 1;21(1):171. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Hamdan Bin Mohamed College of Dental Medicine, Mohamed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU), Dubai, UAE.

Background: This study assessed retrospectively the clinical outcomes of single implant-supported crowns and implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs).

Methods: This case series compared biological and technical complications in single implant-supported crowns and implant-supported bridges in a time framed sample of all patients who received dental implants between 2009 and 2016 in Dubai Health Authority. Only 3-unit implant-supported prostheses (FDPs) with one intervening pontic and an implant each end were included for comparison to single crown supported implants. Cantilevered implants, implant-supported dentures and cases involving bone grafts or sinus lifts were excluded. The primary outcome measure was marginal bone loss, measured on digital radiographs taken after prosthesis placement at baseline and one year after implant loading, whilst peri-implantitis and technical complications were secondary outcomes. Mixed regression models adjusted for clustering of implants within patients was used for patient and implant factor associations.

Results: A total of 454 patients (152 males; 302 females) had 1673 implants. The mean age of males (53.7 years, SD 14.6) was significantly greater than females (49.3 years, SD 12.9, p < 0.001). Mean mesial bone loss on the FDPs was significantly greater at 1 year (1.14 mm, SD 0.63) compared with the mesial surface of single implant-supported crowns (0.30 mm, SD 0.43, p < 0.001). Mean distal bone loss was also significantly greater at 1 year on the distal surfaces of implants supporting bridgework (1.29 mm, SD 0.71) compared with distal surfaces on single implant-supported crowns (0.36 mm, SD 0.54, p < 0.001). Mean marginal bone loss mesially and distally around implants placed in the lower anterior sextant was significantly greater compared to all other sites (p < 0.001). Bone loss by gender, patient's age and medical condition was not different between the 2 implant groups. Screw loosening was the main technical complication (11.5%) whilst peri-implantitis occurred rarely (0.5%). The 66 cement retained implants had significantly more complications compared to the 1607 screw retained implants (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Mean marginal bone loss around the supporting implants of FDPs (3-unit fixed bridgework) was greater than on single implant-supported crowns at one year after implant loading. Position in the mouth was associated with bone loss. Biological and technical complications occurred rarely.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-021-01530-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8017629PMC
April 2021

Direct Composite Resin for the Management of Tooth Wear: A Systematic Review.

Clin Cosmet Investig Dent 2020 3;12:465-475. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Prosthodontics, Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University (MBRU) of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Background: This study systematically reviewed survival of direct composite to restore worn teeth.

Materials And Methods: A comprehensive electronic search of databases sourced from Medline-PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central, Scopus, Google scholar was performed on literature published between January 1990 and December 2018. Grey literature was also reviewed. Data extraction included sample size, number of composite restorations, operators, composite type, mean or total follow-up time and success rate expressed as either percent of successful restorations or median survival time (MST). Methodological quality was rated using the Joanna Briggs Institute appraisal checklist for case series. Studies on children, non-carious cervical lesions, cast and all-ceramic restorations, case reports and case series with <5 participants were excluded.

Results: A total of 1563 studies were identified and 1472 were screened. Sixty-two full-text papers were assessed for eligibility which resulted in 10 studies that met inclusion criteria. These were mainly case series and assessed 3844 direct composite restorations placed in 373 patients mostly in hospital settings. Survival ranged from 50% to 99.3%. Methodological quality improved from the earlier studies and was rated low to moderate in 7 studies and good in 3. The funnel plot showed a low risk of publication bias but there was considerable heterogeneity (I=97.7%). There was a non-significant weak negative association between age and survival (Spearman's rho=-0.12).

Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of the studies proved difficult because of the nature of case series but reporting improved in the later studies. Despite the generally short duration of studies, small sample sizes in terms of patient numbers and composite restorations, the survival rates of direct hybrid composite resin in the short to medium term are acceptable and support their application for the restoration of worn teeth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCIDE.S268527DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7650139PMC
November 2020

The Oral Health Status of Attendees and Residents in United Arab Emirates Care Homes.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2020 Jan-Feb;10(1):101-106. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Prosthodontics, Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU), Dubai, UAE.

Objectives: This cross-sectional study assessed the oral health status of attendees and residents in United Arab Emirates (UAE) care homes.

Materials And Methods: All care homes identified from the UAE Ministry of Health website were selected and all attendees or residents included. Medical conditions were classified according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Oral and dental status was recorded on the WHO Oral Health Assessment form for adults and demographic details were recorded separately. The three examiners had training and calibration exercises before conducting the dental examinations with an overall mean inter-examiner κ of 0.67.

Results: A total of 107 patients participated in the study with a mean age of 67.5 years (standard deviation [SD] = 15.65 years). The mean age of men ( = 57) (69.2 years, SD = 16.3) was not significantly different to the mean age of women (65.5 years, SD = 14.8, > 0.05). The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification of mild disease was present in 71 participants, whereas 27 were classified with severe systemic disease. Multiple medical problems were common ( = 28), followed by endocrine disease ( = 26) and mental health problems ( = 20). Gingivitis and/or periodontitis were present in 58 (72%) of 81 dentate participants (26 participants were edentate). Overall mean decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) was 23.2 (SD = 9.0) but mean DMFT in men was significantly greater (26.5) than women at 19.8 ( < 0.001). Age had a weak positive correlation with DMFT, Spearman's rho = +0.43 ( < 0.001). Eighteen participants of 88 (20.5%) complained of pain or soreness at the time of examination. The frequency of tooth brushing/cleaning the mouth was not correlated to participants' mobility (being bed-bound). Age and gender were predictive for DMFT but not education or ASA classification. Gender and ASA classification predicted periodontal status.

Conclusion: Oral health was generally poor with pain and discomfort present in a high number of care home residents/attendees. Carers require training in oral health as dental care is a priority for this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_349_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7055337PMC
February 2020

Effectiveness of Alcohol and Aldehyde Spray Disinfectants on Dental Impressions.

Clin Cosmet Investig Dent 2020 13;12:25-30. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Prosthodontics, Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University (MBRU) of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Background: The gold standard for disinfection of dental impressions is by immersion although spray techniques are also available. This study compared the effectiveness of alcohol and aldehyde spray disinfectants on analogue dental impressions in a hospital setting.

Materials And Methods: Impressions were swabbed after removal from the mouth (pre-disinfection) and after spraying (post-disinfection) with either a non-aldehyde alcohol-based disinfectant, Bossklein (Silsden, W Yorks, BD20 0EF, UK) or a glutaraldehyde-based alcohol-free disinfectant, MD520 (Dürr Dental, 74321 Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany). Swabs were transported to the microbiology laboratory in Amies medium and plated onto sheep blood agar within 2 hrs. Plates were incubated for 3 days at 37°C then at room temperature for 3 days. After incubation, all plates were examined for microbial growth.

Results: A total of 87 impressions were assessed (alginate = 41; poly-vinyl siloxane (PVS) = 31; polyether = 15). The counts were categorized into two groups: no growth or growth present. Post-disinfection contamination was present on six alginate and six PVS impressions but only one polyether impression (x = 1.27, P > 0.05, NSS). Analysis of post-disinfection growth according to impression and disinfectant found significantly more contaminated PVS impressions with the alcohol-based spray than with the aldehyde spray (x = 5.37, p < 0.05). Disinfection with the aldehyde-based spray resulted in only two contaminated impressions, both in alginate.

Conclusion: Alcohol-based spray disinfection of dental impressions may be less effective than aldehyde spray and full immersion of impressions is recommended. Careful wetting or soaking of all surfaces of impressions is very important when using a spray.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCIDE.S233336DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7025651PMC
February 2020

Convergence angles of all-ceramic full crown preparations performed in Dubai private practice.

J Clin Exp Dent 2018 Dec 1;10(12):e1192-e1197. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

DDS Dr Med Dent, Department of Prosthodontics, Hamdan Bin Mohamed College of Dental Medicine, Mohamed Bin Rashid University (MBRU) of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, UAE.

Background: This study aimed to determine the degree of taper and total occlusal convergence angles (TOC) for all-ceramic bonded crown preparations carried out by private practitioners in Dubai, UAE.

Material And Methods: A convenience sample of all-ceramic crown preparations carried out by private dental practitioners were scanned (Carestream CS 3500) from casts and the digital images assessed. The degree of taper was measured on the axial walls of each crown preparation and the bucco-lingual and mesio-distal convergence angles subsequently calculated.

Results: A total of 154 dentists prepared a total of 206 crown preparations (72 anterior, 134 posterior). The mean convergence angles mesio-distally for all preparations was 24.6° (sd 11.8º), and for the bucco-lingual it was 32.6° (sd 15.3°). The mean TOC was 28.6°. In anterior preparations, the mean bucco-lingual convergence angle was 38.8° (sd 12.2°) compared to 29.3° (sd 15.5°) for posterior preparations (<0.001). Mean mesio-distal convergence anteriorly was 20.6° (sd 10.18°) compared to 26.7° (sd 12.16°) posteriorly (<0.001). Distal and buccal taper were significantly greater on posterior teeth (<0.001) compared to anteriors whereas lingual taper was greater on anterior teeth (<0.001). Mesial taper was not different. Premolars had significantly lower convergence values compared to other teeth.

Conclusions: Bucco-lingual and mesio-distal convergence angles significantly exceeded the clinically acceptable convergence angle of between 10° and 22°. Greater axial taper is recommended for resin bonded all-ceramic crowns but reliance on adhesion in such preparations rather than parallelism may reduce retention and have increased biologic cost to pulp health. All-ceramic crown preparations, convergence angles, axial taper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.55269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343971PMC
December 2018

Tooth wear during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: a systematic review.

J Orthod 2018 12 19;45(4):260-268. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

a Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine (HBMCDM) , Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU) , Dubai , UAE.

Objectives: Tooth wear, additional to the physiologic alterations of the dentition, may occur during orthodontic treatment. The objective of the present review was to investigate systematically the literature relevant to its progression in patients having undergone comprehensive orthodontic treatment.

Data Sources: Search without restrictions in eight databases since inception and hand searching until October 2017 was performed.

Data Selection: Studies evaluating tooth wear immediately before and after the completion of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance were evaluated independently and in duplicate.

Data Extraction: Following study retrieval and selection, data on volumetric and surface tooth wear was extracted. Individual study risk of bias assessment was performed using the Risk Of Bias In Non-randomised Studies - of Interventions (ROBINS-I) tool, and the overall quality of the evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.

Data Synthesis: All three finally included studies reported wear of teeth during the period of treatment but were at serious risk of bias. Two of them investigated tooth wear by 3D volumetric measurements and one used grading scales. The mean volume reduction was 1.02 mm per tooth for the incisor group [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.84-1.20], 1.62 mm for the canines [95% CI: 0.8-2.38; I= 96%; random effects method] and 0.95 mm for premolars and molars [95% CI: 0.84-1.07]. The overall quality of evidence limited the confidence in the observed estimates.

Conclusions: Varying degrees of tooth wear were reported after comprehensive orthodontic treatment. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate how much is associated with orthodontic treatment and/or physiologic alterations of the dentition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14653125.2018.1517469DOI Listing
December 2018

Dental erosion in a series of referred patients was statistically associated with gastric reflux, acidic drink intake of more than 0.5 L per day, and low salivary buffering capacity.

J Evid Based Dent Pract 2010 Sep;10(3):176-8

Restorative Dentistry, Liverpool University Dental Hospital, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5PS, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebdp.2010.05.006DOI Listing
September 2010

The eating disorders: 2. Behavioural and dental management.

Dent Update 2007 Dec;34(10):612-6, 619-20

Liverpool University Dental Hospital, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5PS, UK.

Unlabelled: The eating disorders are a group of related but distinct disturbances in eating behaviour with wide-ranging effects. The first part in this series described the scientific background, clinical features and impact upon oro-dental health. This second part discusses behavioural and dental management.

Clinical Relevance: Dentists should have knowledge of the behavioural management of eating disorders (ED), especially if their ED patients are seeing other healthcare professionals. Dentists with this understanding may better engage with an ED patient in order to provide successful dental management within an overall holistic approach to patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/denu.2007.34.10.612DOI Listing
December 2007

The eating disorders: 1. Current scientific understanding and dental implications.

Dent Update 2007 Nov;34(9):544-6, 549-50, 553-4

Liverpool University Dental Hospital, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5PS, UK.

Unlabelled: The eating disorders are a group of related but distinct disturbances in eating behaviour with wide-ranging effects. This first part describes the epidemiology, aetiology, general clinical features and specific dental sequelae associated with the eating disorders. Part 2 discusses psychological aspects of management as well as dental treatment.

Clinical Relevance: Dental health can be compromised in patients with an eating disorder. Dentists should understand the medical, psychological and dental features and competently manage any secondary dental problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/denu.2007.34.9.544DOI Listing
November 2007