Publications by authors named "Alexa S Lupi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Shared Genetic Basis of Hyperuricemia, Gout, and Kidney Function.

Semin Nephrol 2020 Nov;40(6):586-599

Department of Biochemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. Electronic address:

Increased urate levels and gout correlate with chronic kidney disease with consensus that the primary driver of this relationship is reduced kidney function. However, a comparison of results of genome-wide association studies in serum urate levels and kidney function indicate a more complex situation. Approximately 20% of loci are shared-comprised of those in which the urate-raising allele associates with reduced kidney function, the vice versa situation, and those in which the signals/alleles are different. Although there is very little known regarding the molecular basis of the shared genetic relationship, it is clear that there is no major role for urate transporters and associated transportasome machinery. Some loci, however, do provide clues. The ATXN2 locus, with a shared signal, is one of only a small number of master regulators of expression by chromatin interaction, regulating expression of genes relevant for cholesterol and blood pressure. This suggests a role for systemic metabolic alteration. At HNF4A there is genetic heterogeneity with different genetic variants conferring risk to hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease, suggesting different pathways. Interestingly, the shared loci congregate in the olfactory receptor pathway. The genome-wide association studies have generated a range of experimentally testable hypotheses that should provide insights into the shared pathogenesis of hyperuricemia/gout and chronic kidney disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semnephrol.2020.12.002DOI Listing
November 2020

Genetic correlations between traits associated with hyperuricemia, gout, and comorbidities.

Eur J Hum Genet 2021 Feb 26. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Institute for Quantitative Health Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.

Hypertension, obesity, chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes are comorbidities that have very high prevalence among persons with hyperuricemia (serum urate > 6.8 mg/dL) and gout. Here we use multivariate genetic models to test the hypothesis that the co-association of traits representing hyperuricemia and its comorbidities is genetically based. Using Bayesian whole-genome regression models, we estimated the genetic marker-based variance and the covariance between serum urate, serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure (SBP), blood glucose and body mass index (BMI) from two independent family-based studies: The Framingham Heart Study-FHS and the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network study-HyperGEN. The main genetic findings that replicated in both FHS and HyperGEN, were (1) creatinine was genetically correlated only with urate and (2) BMI was genetically correlated with urate, SBP, and glucose. The environmental covariance among the traits was generally highest for trait pairs involving BMI. The genetic overlap of traits representing the comorbidities of hyperuricemia and gout appears to cluster in two separate axes of genetic covariance. Because creatinine is genetically correlated with urate but not with metabolic traits, this suggests there is one genetic module of shared loci associated with hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. Another module of shared loci may account for the association of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome. This study provides a clear quantitative genetic basis for the clustering of comorbidities with hyperuricemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-021-00830-zDOI Listing
February 2021