Publications by authors named "Alena Mickova"

3 Publications

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Skp2 and Slug Are Coexpressed in Aggressive Prostate Cancer and Inhibited by Neddylation Blockade.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 11;22(6). Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Department of Clinical and Molecular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University and University Hospital, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men in Western countries, and there is still an urgent need for a better understanding of PCa progression to inspire new treatment strategies. Skp2 is a substrate-recruiting component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, whose activity is regulated through neddylation. Slug is a transcriptional repressor involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which may contribute to therapy resistance. Although Skp2 has previously been associated with a mesenchymal phenotype and prostate cancer progression, the relationship with Slug deserves further elucidation. We have previously shown that a high Gleason score (≥8) is associated with higher Skp2 and lower E-cadherin expression. In this study, significantly increased expression of Skp2, AR, and Slug, along with E-cadherin downregulation, was observed in primary prostate cancer in patients who already had lymph node metastases. Skp2 was slightly correlated with Slug and AR in the whole cohort (Rs 0.32 and 0.37, respectively), which was enhanced for both proteins in patients with high Gleason scores (Rs 0.56 and 0.53, respectively) and, in the case of Slug, also in patients with metastasis to lymph nodes (Rs 0.56). Coexpression of Skp2 and Slug was confirmed in prostate cancer tissues by multiplex immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The same relationship between these two proteins was observed in three sets of prostate epithelial cell lines (PC3, DU145, and E2) and their mesenchymal counterparts. Chemical inhibition of Skp2, but not RNA interference, modestly decreased Slug protein in PC3 and its docetaxel-resistant subline PC3 DR12. Importantly, chemical inhibition of Skp2 by MLN4924 upregulated p27 and decreased Slug expression in PC3, PC3 DR12, and LAPC4 cells. Novel treatment strategies targeting Skp2 and Slug by the neddylation blockade may be promising in advanced prostate cancer, as recently documented for other aggressive solid tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22062844DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8000894PMC
March 2021

Slug-expressing mouse prostate epithelial cells have increased stem cell potential.

Stem Cell Res 2020 07 12;46:101844. Epub 2020 May 12.

Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno, Czech Republic; Center of Biomolecular and Cellular Engineering, International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne's University Hospital Brno, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic; Department of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Deciphering the properties of adult stem cells is crucial for understanding of their role in healthy tissue and in cancer progression as well. Both stem cells and cancer stem cells have shown association with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in various tissue types. Aiming to investigate the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypic traits in adult mouse prostate, we sorted subpopulations of basal prostate stem cells (mPSCs) and assessed the expression levels of EMT regulators and markers with custom-designed gene expression array. The population of mPSCs defined by a Lin/Sca-1CD49f/Trop-2 (LSC Trop-2) surface phenotype was enriched in mesenchymal markers, especially EMT master regulator Slug, encoded by the Snai2 gene. To further dissect the role of Slug in mPSCs, we used transgenic Snai2 reporter mouse strain. Using this model, we confirmed the presence of mesenchymal traits and increase of organoid forming capacity in Slug population of mPSCs. The Slug-derived organoids comprised all prostate epithelial cell types - basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine. Collectively, these data uncover the important role of Slug expression in the physiology of mouse prostate stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scr.2020.101844DOI Listing
July 2020

DNA damage signalling barrier, oxidative stress and treatment-relevant DNA repair factor alterations during progression of human prostate cancer.

Mol Oncol 2016 06 3;10(6):879-94. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Laboratory of Genome Integrity, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

The DNA damage checkpoints provide an anti-cancer barrier in diverse tumour types, however this concept has remained unexplored in prostate cancer (CaP). Furthermore, targeting DNA repair defects by PARP1 inhibitors (PARPi) as a cancer treatment strategy is emerging yet requires suitable predictive biomarkers. To address these issues, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of multiple markers of DNA damage signalling, oxidative stress, DNA repair and cell cycle control pathways during progression of human prostate disease from benign hyperplasia, through intraepithelial neoplasia to CaP, complemented by genetic analyses of TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement and NQO1, an anti-oxidant factor and p53 protector. The DNA damage checkpoint barrier (γH2AX, pATM, p53) mechanism was activated during CaP tumorigenesis, albeit less and with delayed culmination compared to other cancers, possibly reflecting lower replication stress (slow proliferation despite cases of Rb loss and cyclin D1 overexpression) and progressive loss of ATM activator NKX3.1. Oxidative stress (8-oxoguanine lesions) and NQO1 increased during disease progression. NQO1 genotypes of 390 men did not indicate predisposition to CaP, yet loss of NQO1 in CaP suggested potential progression-opposing tumour suppressor role. TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement and PTEN loss, events sensitizing to PARPi, occurred frequently along with heterogeneous loss of DNA repair factors 53BP1, JMJD1C and Rev7 (all studied here for the first time in CaP) whose defects may cause resistance to PARPi. Overall, our results reveal an unorthodox DNA damage checkpoint barrier scenario in CaP tumorigenesis, and provide novel insights into oxidative stress and DNA repair, with implications for biomarker guidance of future targeted therapy of CaP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molonc.2016.02.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423169PMC
June 2016