Publications by authors named "Aleksandr Andreev"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Phenotypic Characterization of a Comprehensive Set of MAPK1/ERK2 Missense Mutants.

Cell Rep 2016 10;17(4):1171-1183

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Electronic address:

Tumor-specific genomic information has the potential to guide therapeutic strategies and revolutionize patient treatment. Currently, this approach is limited by an abundance of disease-associated mutants whose biological functions and impacts on therapeutic response are uncharacterized. To begin to address this limitation, we functionally characterized nearly all (99.84%) missense mutants of MAPK1/ERK2, an essential effector of oncogenic RAS and RAF. Using this approach, we discovered rare gain- and loss-of-function ERK2 mutants found in human tumors, revealing that, in the context of this assay, mutational frequency alone cannot identify all functionally impactful mutants. Gain-of-function ERK2 mutants induced variable responses to RAF-, MEK-, and ERK-directed therapies, providing a reference for future treatment decisions. Tumor-associated mutations spatially clustered in two ERK2 effector-recruitment domains yet produced mutants with opposite phenotypes. This approach articulates an allele-characterization framework that can be scaled to meet the goals of genome-guided oncology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.09.061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5120861PMC
October 2016

Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq.

Science 2016 Apr;352(6282):189-96

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.

To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors, we applied single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to 4645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal, and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug-resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that tumors characterized by high levels of the MITF transcription factor also contained cells with low MITF and elevated levels of the AXL kinase. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor microenvironmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single-cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aad0501DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4944528PMC
April 2016

A chemical screen identifies small molecules that regulate hepcidin expression.

Blood Cells Mol Dis 2014 Dec 4;53(4):231-40. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, United States; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, United States. Electronic address:

Hepcidin, a peptide hormone produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release via effects on ferroportin. Bone morphogenic protein and Stat3 signaling regulate Hepcidin's transcription. Hepcidin is a potential drug target for patients with iron overload syndromes because its levels are inappropriately low in these individuals. To generate a tool for identifying small molecules that modulate Hepcidin expression, we stably transfected human hepatocytes (HepG2) cells with a reporter construct containing 2.7kb of the human Hepcidin promoter upstream of a firefly reporter gene. We used high throughput methods to screen 10,169 chemicals in duplicate for their effect on Hepcidin expression and cell viability. Regulators were identified as chemicals that caused a change >3 standard deviations above or >1 standard deviation below the mean of the other chemicals (z-score >3 or <1), while not adversely affecting cell viability, quantified by fluorescence assay. Following validation assays, we identified 16 chemicals in a broad range of functional classes that promote Hepcidin expression. All of the chemicals identified increased expression of bone morphogenic protein-dependent and/or Stat3-dependent genes, however none of them strongly increased phosphorylation of Smad1,5,8 or Stat3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcmd.2014.06.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4198503PMC
December 2014