Publications by authors named "Akram A Abdo Qasem"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Ziziphus and Cordia Gums on Dough Properties and Baking Performance of Cookies.

Molecules 2022 May 10;27(10). Epub 2022 May 10.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, King Saud University, Riyadh 1145, Saudi Arabia.

The influence of 2% and 5% Cordia (CG) and Ziziphus (ZG) gums on dough characteristics and cookie quality was investigated. Micro-DoughLab, a texture analyzer (TA), a rapid viscoanalyzer (RVA), and solvent retention capacity were used to examine the effect of CG and ZG gums on dough physicochemical parameters (SRC) and cookie quality. The diameter, thickness, spread, and sensory evaluation of cookies were evaluated. With the addition of CG and ZG, dough softness, mixing time, and mixing tolerance index (MTI) increased, whereas stability and water absorption decreased. TA data showed that adding gums resulted in softer and less sticky doughs than the control, whereas RVA data showed that adding CG resulted in a significant increase in peak viscosity, but no change in flour gel setback. In comparison to the control and CG samples, the ZG samples exhibited the most dough extensibility. The thickness and diameter of the cookies increased but the spread decreased, due to the added gums. The gum-containing cookies had a lower overall acceptability by panelists than the control, although only by a small margin. Gum-containing cookies, on the other hand, can deliver up to 5% soluble fiber.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules27103066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9146660PMC
May 2022

Exploring the Role of Acacia () and Cactus () Gums on the Dough Performance and Quality Attributes of Breads and Cakes.

Foods 2022 Apr 21;11(9). Epub 2022 Apr 21.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, King Saud University, Riyadh 1145, Saudi Arabia.

Two hydrocolloids, acacia gum and cactus gum, were tested in the current study to see if they could improve the quality of the dough or have an effect on the shelf life of pan bread and sponge cake. Both gums considerably ( < 0.05) enhanced the dough development time, softness, and mixing tolerance index while decreasing the water absorption. Although the dough was more stable with the addition of acacia gum than with cactus gum, the control sample had the highest peak, final, breakdown, and setback viscosities. Acacia gum, on the other hand, resulted in a higher wheat-flour-slurry pasting temperature (84.07 °C) than cactus gum (68.53 °C). The inclusion of both gums, particularly 3%, reduces the gel's textural hardness, gumminess, chewiness, springiness, and adhesiveness. Lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) were both increased by the addition of acacia gum to bread and cake, whereas the addition of cactus gum increased both color parameters for cakes. The use of acacia gum increased the bread and cake's volume. Cactus gum, on the other hand, caused a decrease in bread hardness after 24 h and 96 h. The cake containing acacia gum, on the other hand, was the least stiff after both storage times. Similarly, sensory attributes such as the crumb color and overall acceptability of the bread and cake were improved by 3% with acacia gum. For these and other reasons, the addition of cactus and acacia gums to bread and cake increased their organoleptic qualities, controlled staining, and made them softer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods11091208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9105275PMC
April 2022

Effect of Cactus () and Acacia () Gums on the Pasting, Thermal, Textural, and Rheological Properties of Corn, Sweet Potato, and Turkish Bean Starches.

Molecules 2022 Jan 21;27(3). Epub 2022 Jan 21.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 1145, Saudi Arabia.

This study was planned to explore the locally available natural sources of gum hydrocolloids as a natural modifier of different starch properties. Corn (CS), sweet potato (SPS), and Turkish bean (TBS) starches were mixed with locally extracted native or acetylated cactus (CG) and acacia (AG) gums at 2 and 5% replacement levels. The binary mixtures (starch-gums) were prepared in water, freeze dried, ground to powder, and stored airtight. A rapid viscoanalyzer (RVA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), texture analyzer, and dynamic rheometer were used to explore their pasting, thermal, textural, and rheological properties. The presence of acetylated AG or CG increased the final viscosity (FV) in all three starches when compared to starch pastes containing native gums. Plain SPS dispersion had a higher pasting temperature (PT) than CS and TBS. The addition of AG or CG increased the PT of CS, SPS, and TBS. The thermograms revealed the overall enthalpy change of the starch and gum blends: TBS > SPS > CS. The peak temperature () of starches increased with increasing gum concentration from 2 to 5% for both AG and CG native and modified gums. When compared to the control gels, the addition of 2% CG, either native or modified, reduced the syneresis of starch gels. However, further addition (5% CG) increased the gels' syneresis. Furthermore, the syneresis for the first cycle on the fourth day was higher than the second cycle on the eighth day for all starches. The addition of native and acetylated CG reduced the hardness of starch gels at all concentrations tested. All of the starch dispersions had higher G' than G″ values, indicating that they were more elastic and less viscous with or without the gums. The apparent viscosity of all starch gels decreased as shear was increased, with profiles indicating time-dependent thixotropic behavior. All of the starch gels, with or without gums, showed a non-Newtonian shear thinning trend in the shear stress vs. shear rate graphs. The addition of acetylated CG gum to CS resulted in a higher activation energy () than the native counterparts and the control. More specifically, starch gels with a higher gum concentration (5%) provided greater than their native counterparts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules27030701DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8838407PMC
January 2022

Functionality of Cordia and Ziziphus Gums with Respect to the Dough Properties and Baking Performance of Stored Pan Bread and Sponge Cakes.

Foods 2022 Feb 3;11(3). Epub 2022 Feb 3.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, King Saud University, Riyadh 1145, Saudi Arabia.

The functionality of hydrocolloids of different origins, gum Cordia (GC), and gum ziziphus (GZ) on pan bread and sponge cake quality and their potential use in retarding the staling process have been studied. The effects of the gums were determined by assessing the pasting qualities of wheat flour slurry, dough properties, and the finished product. After 24 and 96 h of storage, investigations were conducted on the finished product. Micro-doughLab was used to assess dough mixing qualities, and a texture profile analysis (TPA) test was used to assess the texture. A hedonic sensory test of texture, scent, taste, color, and general approval was also conducted. The type of gum used had a significant impact on the physical properties of the bread and cake and their evolution through time. Reduced amylose retrogradation was demonstrated by the lower peak viscosity and substantially lower setback of wheat flour gels, which corresponded to lower gel hardness. Gums were superior at increasing the bread loaf volume, especially GZ, although gums had the opposite effect on cake volume. After both storage periods, the hardness of the bread and cake was much lower than that of the control. Except when 2% GC was used, adding GC and GZ gums to bread and cake invariably increased the overall acceptability of the product. In terms of shelf-life, GZ was able to retain all texture parameters, volume, and general acceptability close to the control after storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods11030460DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8834351PMC
February 2022

Use of Gum Cordia () as a Natural Starch Modifier; Effect on Pasting, Thermal, Textural, and Rheological Properties of Corn Starch.

Foods 2020 Jul 10;9(7). Epub 2020 Jul 10.

Department of Food Science & Nutrition, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Incorporation of hydrocolloid gums in native starches help to improve their pasting, thermal, rheological and textural properties along with improvement in the stability of starch gels. The use of gum is not widely studied as a starch modifier and this fact could make this study more interesting and unique. This study investigated the effects of the non-conventional hydrocolloid gum ( gum) on corn starch properties. Corn starch and gum (GC) blends were prepared at different replacement levels (0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12%). The effect of GC levels on pasting, thermal, rheological, and textural properties were evaluated using rapid viscoanalyzer, differential scanning colorimeter, rheometer, and texture analyzer. The presence of GC significantly increased starch gelatinization temperatures, enthalpies, peak viscosities, final viscosities, and setback viscosities. GC improved freeze thaw stability in starch. The shear rate (1/s) versus shear stress (σ) data of all samples fitted well to the simple power law model (R = 0.97-0.99). The control had the lowest flow behavior index ( 0.17), which increased to (0.36-0.56) with increasing GC levels. The consistency index () of the starch-gum blends increased with increasing GC levels. The dominance of elastic properties over viscous properties was demonstrated by G' > G″. The magnitudes of G' and G″ increased with increasing GC concentration. The outcomes could help to use this modification method as an alternative to chemical and enzymatic modification with respect to cost, safety, less time consumption and less requirement of process modifications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods9070909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7404790PMC
July 2020

Effect of Hydrocolloid Gums on the Pasting, Thermal, Rheological and Textural Properties of Chickpea Starch.

Foods 2019 Dec 16;8(12). Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Department of Food Sciences, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

The study was planned to evaluate the effect of non-commercial gums as compared to commercial gums. The concentration dependent effect of two commercial (arabic, xanthan) and four non-commercial (cress seed, fenugreek, flaxseed, okra) polysaccharide gums on the pasting, rheological, textural and thermal properties of chickpea were investigated by rapid visco analyzer (RVA), hybrid rheometer, texture analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Blends were prepared by replacing chickpea starch at 0.5% and 2.0% with gums, whereas native chickpea starch was used as a control. RVA data showed that peak and final viscosities were dramatically increased with xanthan contrary to reduction with gum arabic, flaxseed and okra gums. Hybrid rheometer displayed that storage and loss moduli were increased as a function of angular frequency and dominance of elastic properties over viscous ones. Xanthan blend was less temperature dependent due to dramatic decrease in activation energy value as compared to control while other gums were more temperature dependent. The magnitude of this effect was reliant on the type and concentration of gum. After storage for 21 days at -20 °C, total syneresis was reduced with the incorporation of xanthan and cress seed and also with high levels of gum arabic, flaxseed and fenugreek gums. The gel hardness was increased after overnight storage at ambient temperature (23 °C) with fenugreek while reduction in hardness was observed with xanthan, flaxseed and okra gums. The presence of gums resulted in significantly higher onset and peak temperatures determined through differential scanning calorimetry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods8120687DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6963556PMC
December 2019

Wheat-millet flour cookies: Physical, textural, sensory attributes and antioxidant potential.

Food Sci Technol Int 2020 Jun 9;26(4):311-320. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Department of Food Sciences, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Millet flour (water washed or alkali washed) was replaced with wheat flour (WF) at 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% levels. Objectives of the research were to characterize the flour blends for their technical properties and to produce cookies with less or no gluten contents. All types of flour blends were evaluated for their pasting properties. The cookies were baked and evaluated for their textural and physical attributes. Inclusion of millet flour (both types) in wheat flour resulted in significant reduction in peak and final viscosities while setback viscosities were affected non-significantly. Pasting temperature was increased from 65 ℃ (100% wheat flour) to 91 ℃ (100% millet flour). The hardness of cookies was reduced in the presence of millet flour. Fracturability values of cookies with higher millet flour were higher as compared to control cookies (prepared from 100% wheat flour). Cookies prepared from blends having more that 50% millet flour were not much liked by sensory panelists. The phenolic contents of cookies containing higher levels of either water washed or alkali washed millet flour were found to be higher when compared to cookies prepared from plain WF (1.90 ± 0.14 mg gallic acid/g sample). The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activity (%) of cookies ranged from 16.39 ± 0.34 (100% water washed millet flour) to 10.39 ± 0.26 (100% WF; control). The study will help the non-coeliac people to consume low gluten (≈1.6-6.5%) or gluten intolerant people to consume gluten-free cookies (0%) from millet flour having abundant of antioxidants and health-promoting polyphenols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1082013219894127DOI Listing
June 2020

Dynamic rheological properties of corn starch-date syrup gels.

J Food Sci Technol 2019 Feb 25;56(2):927-936. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

The rheological, pasting, and gel textural properties of corn starch blended with date syrup (DS) or sugar (SG) were studied. The average amylose content of the starch was 27.8%. Corn starch gel is considered elastic since the elastic modulus (G') was much greater than the viscous modulus (G″). Different effect between DS and SG on corn starch gel was observed, where SG addition and DS replacement experiments exhibited the highest G'. The tan δ of all samples was in the range of 0.02-0.20 indicating elastic behavior since it is less than unity. The hardness of starch gel ranged from 13 to 146 g and 212-145 for DS replacement and DS addition, respectively. Unlike the replacement experiment, the addition experiment exhibited significant increase in peak viscosity, setback and pasting temperature ( > 0.05). The magnitude of the effect of DS on corn starch gel was more evident compared to SG. This was apparent by looking at the slopes of the linear regression of the log of G' or G″ versus the log of frequency. Based on the information provided here, date syrup application can expand to cover the baking and beverage industries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-018-03558-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6400774PMC
February 2019
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