Publications by authors named "Aida Telegrafi"

35 Publications

Truncating variants in the SHANK1 gene are associated with a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Genet Med 2021 10 10;23(10):1912-1921. Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Institute for Genomic Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Purpose: In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical phenotype of a SHANK1-related disorder and define the functional consequences of SHANK1 truncating variants.

Methods: Exome sequencing (ES) was performed for six individuals who presented with neurodevelopmental disorders. Individuals were ascertained with the use of GeneMatcher and Database of Chromosomal Imbalance and Phenotype in Humans Using Ensembl Resources (DECIPHER). We evaluated potential nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of two variants by making knock-in cell lines of endogenous truncated SHANK1, and expressed the truncated SHANK1 complementary DNA (cDNA) in HEK293 cells and cultured hippocampal neurons to examine the proteins.

Results: ES detected de novo truncating variants in SHANK1 in six individuals. Evaluation of NMD resulted in stable transcripts, and the truncated SHANK1 completely lost binding with Homer1, a linker protein that binds to the C-terminus of SHANK1. These variants may disrupt protein-protein networks in dendritic spines. Dispersed localization of the truncated SHANK1 variants within the spine and dendritic shaft was also observed when expressed in neurons, indicating impaired synaptic localization of truncated SHANK1.

Conclusion: This report expands the clinical spectrum of individuals with truncating SHANK1 variants and describes the impact these variants may have on the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01222-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8487955PMC
October 2021

Syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with de novo variants in DDX23.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 10 29;185(10):2863-2872. Epub 2021 May 29.

Greenwood Genetic Center, Greenwood, South Carolina, USA.

The DEAD/DEAH box RNA helicases are a superfamily of proteins involved in the processing and transportation of RNA within the cell. A growing literature supports this family of proteins as contributing to various types of human disorders from neurodevelopmental disorders to syndromes with multiple congenital anomalies. This article presents a cohort of nine unrelated individuals with de novo missense alterations in DDX23 (Dead-Box Helicase 23). The gene is ubiquitously expressed and functions in RNA splicing, maintenance of genome stability, and the sensing of double-stranded RNA. Our cohort of patients, gathered through GeneMatcher, exhibited features including tone abnormalities, global developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, autism spectrum disorder, and seizures. Additionally, there were a variety of other findings in the skeletal, renal, ocular, and cardiac systems. The missense alterations all occurred within a highly conserved RecA-like domain of the protein, and are located within or proximal to the DEAD box sequence. The individuals presented in this article provide evidence of a syndrome related to alterations in DDX23 characterized predominantly by atypical neurodevelopment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62359DOI Listing
October 2021

Variants in PRKAR1B cause a neurodevelopmental disorder with autism spectrum disorder, apraxia, and insensitivity to pain.

Genet Med 2021 08 8;23(8):1465-1473. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Institute of Human Genetics, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.

Purpose: We characterize the clinical and molecular phenotypes of six unrelated individuals with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder who carry heterozygous missense variants of the PRKAR1B gene, which encodes the R1β subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA).

Methods: Variants of PRKAR1B were identified by single- or trio-exome analysis. We contacted the families and physicians of the six individuals to collect phenotypic information, performed in vitro analyses of the identified PRKAR1B-variants, and investigated PRKAR1B expression during embryonic development.

Results: Recent studies of large patient cohorts with neurodevelopmental disorders found significant enrichment of de novo missense variants in PRKAR1B. In our cohort, de novo origin of the PRKAR1B variants could be confirmed in five of six individuals, and four carried the same heterozygous de novo variant c.1003C>T (p.Arg335Trp; NM_001164760). Global developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, and apraxia/dyspraxia have been reported in all six, and reduced pain sensitivity was found in three individuals carrying the c.1003C>T variant. PRKAR1B expression in the brain was demonstrated during human embryonal development. Additionally, in vitro analyses revealed altered basal PKA activity in cells transfected with variant-harboring PRKAR1B expression constructs.

Conclusion: Our study provides strong evidence for a PRKAR1B-related neurodevelopmental disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01152-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8354857PMC
August 2021

SPEN haploinsufficiency causes a neurodevelopmental disorder overlapping proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome with an episignature of X chromosomes in females.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 03 16;108(3):502-516. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Deletion 1p36 (del1p36) syndrome is the most common human disorder resulting from a terminal autosomal deletion. This condition is molecularly and clinically heterogeneous. Deletions involving two non-overlapping regions, known as the distal (telomeric) and proximal (centromeric) critical regions, are sufficient to cause the majority of the recurrent clinical features, although with different facial features and dysmorphisms. SPEN encodes a transcriptional repressor commonly deleted in proximal del1p36 syndrome and is located centromeric to the proximal 1p36 critical region. Here, we used clinical data from 34 individuals with truncating variants in SPEN to define a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with features that overlap considerably with those of proximal del1p36 syndrome. The clinical profile of this disease includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, aggressive behavior, attention deficit disorder, hypotonia, brain and spine anomalies, congenital heart defects, high/narrow palate, facial dysmorphisms, and obesity/increased BMI, especially in females. SPEN also emerges as a relevant gene for del1p36 syndrome by co-expression analyses. Finally, we show that haploinsufficiency of SPEN is associated with a distinctive DNA methylation episignature of the X chromosome in affected females, providing further evidence of a specific contribution of the protein to the epigenetic control of this chromosome, and a paradigm of an X chromosome-specific episignature that classifies syndromic traits. We conclude that SPEN is required for multiple developmental processes and SPEN haploinsufficiency is a major contributor to a disorder associated with deletions centromeric to the previously established 1p36 critical regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008487PMC
March 2021

TAOK1 is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder and essential for neuronal maturation and cortical development.

Hum Mutat 2021 Apr 1;42(4):445-459. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Pediatrics, SIU School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA.

Thousand and one amino-acid kinase 1 (TAOK1) is a MAP3K protein kinase, regulating different mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, thereby modulating a multitude of processes in the cell. Given the recent finding of TAOK1 involvement in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), we investigated the role of TAOK1 in neuronal function and collected a cohort of 23 individuals with mostly de novo variants in TAOK1 to further define the associated NDD. Here, we provide evidence for an important role for TAOK1 in neuronal function, showing that altered TAOK1 expression levels in the embryonic mouse brain affect neural migration in vivo, as well as neuronal maturation in vitro. The molecular spectrum of the identified TAOK1 variants comprises largely truncating and nonsense variants, but also missense variants, for which we provide evidence that they can have a loss of function or dominant-negative effect on TAOK1, expanding the potential underlying causative mechanisms resulting in NDD. Taken together, our data indicate that TAOK1 activity needs to be properly controlled for normal neuronal function and that TAOK1 dysregulation leads to a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly comprising similar facial features, developmental delay/intellectual disability and/or variable learning or behavioral problems, muscular hypotonia, infant feeding difficulties, and growth problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.24176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8248425PMC
April 2021

Germline AGO2 mutations impair RNA interference and human neurological development.

Nat Commun 2020 11 16;11(1):5797. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Department of Genetics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ARGONAUTE-2 and associated miRNAs form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which targets mRNAs for translational silencing and degradation as part of the RNA interference pathway. Despite the essential nature of this process for cellular function, there is little information on the role of RISC components in human development and organ function. We identify 13 heterozygous mutations in AGO2 in 21 patients affected by disturbances in neurological development. Each of the identified single amino acid mutations result in impaired shRNA-mediated silencing. We observe either impaired RISC formation or increased binding of AGO2 to mRNA targets as mutation specific functional consequences. The latter is supported by decreased phosphorylation of a C-terminal serine cluster involved in mRNA target release, increased formation of dendritic P-bodies in neurons and global transcriptome alterations in patient-derived primary fibroblasts. Our data emphasize the importance of gene expression regulation through the dynamic AGO2-RNA association for human neuronal development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19572-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670403PMC
November 2020

Monogenic variants in dystonia: an exome-wide sequencing study.

Lancet Neurol 2020 11;19(11):908-918

Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

Background: Dystonia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition that occurs in isolation (isolated dystonia), in combination with other movement disorders (combined dystonia), or in the context of multisymptomatic phenotypes (isolated or combined dystonia with other neurological involvement). However, our understanding of its aetiology is still incomplete. We aimed to elucidate the monogenic causes for the major clinical categories of dystonia.

Methods: For this exome-wide sequencing study, study participants were identified at 33 movement-disorder and neuropaediatric specialty centres in Austria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Slovakia, and Switzerland. Each individual with dystonia was diagnosed in accordance with the dystonia consensus definition. Index cases were eligible for this study if they had no previous genetic diagnosis and no indication of an acquired cause of their illness. The second criterion was not applied to a subset of participants with a working clinical diagnosis of dystonic cerebral palsy. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood of participants and whole-exome sequenced. To find causative variants in known disorder-associated genes, all variants were filtered, and unreported variants were classified according to American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. All considered variants were reviewed in expert round-table sessions to validate their clinical significance. Variants that survived filtering and interpretation procedures were defined as diagnostic variants. In the cases that went undiagnosed, candidate dystonia-causing genes were prioritised in a stepwise workflow.

Findings: We sequenced the exomes of 764 individuals with dystonia and 346 healthy parents who were recruited between June 1, 2015, and July 31, 2019. We identified causative or probable causative variants in 135 (19%) of 728 families, involving 78 distinct monogenic disorders. We observed a larger proportion of individuals with diagnostic variants in those with dystonia (either isolated or combined) with coexisting non-movement disorder-related neurological symptoms (100 [45%] of 222; excepting cases with evidence of perinatal brain injury) than in those with combined (19 [19%] of 98) or isolated (16 [4%] of 388) dystonia. Across all categories of dystonia, 104 (65%) of the 160 detected variants affected genes which are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We found diagnostic variants in 11 genes not previously linked to dystonia, and propose a predictive clinical score that could guide the implementation of exome sequencing in routine diagnostics. In cases without perinatal sentinel events, genomic alterations contributed substantively to the diagnosis of dystonic cerebral palsy. In 15 families, we delineated 12 candidate genes. These include IMPDH2, encoding a key purine biosynthetic enzyme, for which robust evidence existed for its involvement in a neurodevelopmental disorder with dystonia. We identified six variants in IMPDH2, collected from four independent cohorts, that were predicted to be deleterious de-novo variants and expected to result in deregulation of purine metabolism.

Interpretation: In this study, we have determined the role of monogenic variants across the range of dystonic disorders, providing guidance for the introduction of personalised care strategies and fostering follow-up pathophysiological explorations.

Funding: Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung, Technische Universität München, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Charles University in Prague, Czech Ministry of Education, the Slovak Grant and Development Agency, the Slovak Research and Grant Agency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(20)30312-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8246240PMC
November 2020

De Novo and Bi-allelic Pathogenic Variants in NARS1 Cause Neurodevelopmental Delay Due to Toxic Gain-of-Function and Partial Loss-of-Function Effects.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 08 31;107(2):311-324. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Bezmiâlem Vakıf Üniversitesi, Istanbul, 34093, Turkey.

Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are ubiquitous, ancient enzymes that charge amino acids to cognate tRNA molecules, the essential first step of protein translation. Here, we describe 32 individuals from 21 families, presenting with microcephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, seizures, peripheral neuropathy, and ataxia, with de novo heterozygous and bi-allelic mutations in asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (NARS1). We demonstrate a reduction in NARS1 mRNA expression as well as in NARS1 enzyme levels and activity in both individual fibroblasts and induced neural progenitor cells (iNPCs). Molecular modeling of the recessive c.1633C>T (p.Arg545Cys) variant shows weaker spatial positioning and tRNA selectivity. We conclude that de novo and bi-allelic mutations in NARS1 are a significant cause of neurodevelopmental disease, where the mechanism for de novo variants could be toxic gain-of-function and for recessive variants, partial loss-of-function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.06.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7413890PMC
August 2020

Mutations in FAM50A suggest that Armfield XLID syndrome is a spliceosomopathy.

Nat Commun 2020 07 23;11(1):3698. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Center for Human Disease Modeling, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Intellectual disability (ID) is a heterogeneous clinical entity and includes an excess of males who harbor variants on the X-chromosome (XLID). We report rare FAM50A missense variants in the original Armfield XLID syndrome family localized in Xq28 and four additional unrelated males with overlapping features. Our fam50a knockout (KO) zebrafish model exhibits abnormal neurogenesis and craniofacial patterning, and in vivo complementation assays indicate that the patient-derived variants are hypomorphic. RNA sequencing analysis from fam50a KO zebrafish show dysregulation of the transcriptome, with augmented spliceosome mRNAs and depletion of transcripts involved in neurodevelopment. Zebrafish RNA-seq datasets show a preponderance of 3' alternative splicing events in fam50a KO, suggesting a role in the spliceosome C complex. These data are supported with transcriptomic signatures from cell lines derived from affected individuals and FAM50A protein-protein interaction data. In sum, Armfield XLID syndrome is a spliceosomopathy associated with aberrant mRNA processing during development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17452-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7378245PMC
July 2020

De Novo Frameshift Variants in the Neuronal Splicing Factor NOVA2 Result in a Common C-Terminal Extension and Cause a Severe Form of Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 04 19;106(4):438-452. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Illkirch 67400, France; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR7104, Illkirch 67400, France; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U964, Illkirch 67400, France; Université de Strasbourg, Illkirch 67400, France; Laboratory of Genetic Diagnostic, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg 67000, France. Electronic address:

The neuro-oncological ventral antigen 2 (NOVA2) protein is a major factor regulating neuron-specific alternative splicing (AS), previously associated with an acquired neurologic condition, the paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (POMA). We report here six individuals with de novo frameshift variants in NOVA2 affected with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability (ID), motor and speech delay, autistic features, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, spasticity or ataxic gait, and abnormal brain MRI. The six variants lead to the same reading frame, adding a common proline rich C-terminal part instead of the last KH RNA binding domain. We detected 41 genes differentially spliced after NOVA2 downregulation in human neural cells. The NOVA2 variant protein shows decreased ability to bind target RNA sequences and to regulate target AS events. It also fails to complement the effect on neurite outgrowth induced by NOVA2 downregulation in vitro and to rescue alterations of retinotectal axonal pathfinding induced by loss of NOVA2 ortholog in zebrafish. Our results suggest a partial loss-of-function mechanism rather than a full heterozygous loss-of-function, although a specific contribution of the novel C-terminal extension cannot be excluded.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.02.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7118572PMC
April 2020

Pathogenic variants in cause a genetic disorder characterised by developmental delay/intellectual disability and a spectrum of neurobehavioural phenotypes including autism and ADHD.

J Med Genet 2020 10 9;57(10):717-724. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.

Background: Rare variants in hundreds of genes have been implicated in developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID) and neurobehavioural phenotypes. encodes a protein important for RNA silencing. Heterozygous truncating variants have been reported in three patients from large cohorts with autism, but no full phenotypic characterisation was described.

Methods: Clinical and molecular characterisation was performed on 17 patients with variants. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective chart review, parent interviews, direct patient interaction with providers and formal neuropsychological evaluation.

Results: Clinical findings included DD/ID (17/17) (speech delay in 94% (16/17), fine motor delay in 82% (14/17) and gross motor delay in 71% (12/17) of subjects), autism or autistic traits (13/17), attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (11/17), other behavioural problems (7/17) and musculoskeletal findings (12/17). Other congenital malformations or clinical findings were occasionally documented. The majority of patients exhibited some dysmorphic features but no recognisable gestalt was identified. 17 heterozygous variants were identified in 12 male and five female unrelated subjects by exome sequencing (14), a targeted panel (2) and a chromosomal microarray (1). The variants were nonsense (7), frameshift (5), splice site (2), intragenic deletions (2) and missense (1).

Conclusions: Variants in cause a novel genetic disorder characterised by recurrent neurocognitive and behavioural phenotypes featuring DD/ID, autism, ADHD and other behavioural abnormalities. Our data highly suggest that haploinsufficiency is the most likely pathogenic mechanism. should be added to the growing list of genes of the RNA-induced silencing complex associated with ID/DD, autism and ADHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106470DOI Listing
October 2020

Loss-of-function mutations in UDP-Glucose 6-Dehydrogenase cause recessive developmental epileptic encephalopathy.

Nat Commun 2020 01 30;11(1):595. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Department of Pediatrics, Department of Neurology, & the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Developmental epileptic encephalopathies are devastating disorders characterized by intractable epileptic seizures and developmental delay. Here, we report an allelic series of germline recessive mutations in UGDH in 36 cases from 25 families presenting with epileptic encephalopathy with developmental delay and hypotonia. UGDH encodes an oxidoreductase that converts UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid, a key component of specific proteoglycans and glycolipids. Consistent with being loss-of-function alleles, we show using patients' primary fibroblasts and biochemical assays, that these mutations either impair UGDH stability, oligomerization, or enzymatic activity. In vitro, patient-derived cerebral organoids are smaller with a reduced number of proliferating neuronal progenitors while mutant ugdh zebrafish do not phenocopy the human disease. Our study defines UGDH as a key player for the production of extracellular matrix components that are essential for human brain development. Based on the incidence of variants observed, UGDH mutations are likely to be a frequent cause of recessive epileptic encephalopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-14360-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6992768PMC
January 2020

Delineation of a Human Mendelian Disorder of the DNA Demethylation Machinery: TET3 Deficiency.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 02 9;106(2):234-245. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Division of Evolution & Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK; Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Health Innovation Manchester, Manchester M13 9WL, UK.

Germline pathogenic variants in chromatin-modifying enzymes are a common cause of pediatric developmental disorders. These enzymes catalyze reactions that regulate epigenetic inheritance via histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation. Cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosine [5mC]) of DNA is the quintessential epigenetic mark, yet no human Mendelian disorder of DNA demethylation has yet been delineated. Here, we describe in detail a Mendelian disorder caused by the disruption of DNA demethylation. TET3 is a methylcytosine dioxygenase that initiates DNA demethylation during early zygote formation, embryogenesis, and neuronal differentiation and is intolerant to haploinsufficiency in mice and humans. We identify and characterize 11 cases of human TET3 deficiency in eight families with the common phenotypic features of intellectual disability and/or global developmental delay; hypotonia; autistic traits; movement disorders; growth abnormalities; and facial dysmorphism. Mono-allelic frameshift and nonsense variants in TET3 occur throughout the coding region. Mono-allelic and bi-allelic missense variants localize to conserved residues; all but one such variant occur within the catalytic domain, and most display hypomorphic function in an assay of catalytic activity. TET3 deficiency and other Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery show substantial phenotypic overlap, including features of intellectual disability and abnormal growth, underscoring shared disease mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7010978PMC
February 2020

Haploinsufficiency of the Notch Ligand DLL1 Causes Variable Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 09 25;105(3):631-639. Epub 2019 Jul 25.

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, USA.

Notch signaling is an established developmental pathway for brain morphogenesis. Given that Delta-like 1 (DLL1) is a ligand for the Notch receptor and that a few individuals with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and brain malformations have microdeletions encompassing DLL1, we hypothesized that insufficiency of DLL1 causes a human neurodevelopmental disorder. We performed exome sequencing in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The cohort was identified using known Matchmaker Exchange nodes such as GeneMatcher. This method identified 15 individuals from 12 unrelated families with heterozygous pathogenic DLL1 variants (nonsense, missense, splice site, and one whole gene deletion). The most common features in our cohort were intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, seizures, variable brain malformations, muscular hypotonia, and scoliosis. We did not identify an obvious genotype-phenotype correlation. Analysis of one splice site variant showed an in-frame insertion of 12 bp. In conclusion, heterozygous DLL1 pathogenic variants cause a variable neurodevelopmental phenotype and multi-systemic features. The clinical and molecular data support haploinsufficiency as a mechanism for the pathogenesis of this DLL1-related disorder and affirm the importance of DLL1 in human brain development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6731356PMC
September 2019

Heterozygous Variants in KMT2E Cause a Spectrum of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Epilepsy.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 06 9;104(6):1210-1222. Epub 2019 May 9.

Institute of Medical Genetics and Applied Genomics, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076, Germany.

We delineate a KMT2E-related neurodevelopmental disorder on the basis of 38 individuals in 36 families. This study includes 31 distinct heterozygous variants in KMT2E (28 ascertained from Matchmaker Exchange and three previously reported), and four individuals with chromosome 7q22.2-22.23 microdeletions encompassing KMT2E (one previously reported). Almost all variants occurred de novo, and most were truncating. Most affected individuals with protein-truncating variants presented with mild intellectual disability. One-quarter of individuals met criteria for autism. Additional common features include macrocephaly, hypotonia, functional gastrointestinal abnormalities, and a subtle facial gestalt. Epilepsy was present in about one-fifth of individuals with truncating variants and was responsive to treatment with anti-epileptic medications in almost all. More than 70% of the individuals were male, and expressivity was variable by sex; epilepsy was more common in females and autism more common in males. The four individuals with microdeletions encompassing KMT2E generally presented similarly to those with truncating variants, but the degree of developmental delay was greater. The group of four individuals with missense variants in KMT2E presented with the most severe developmental delays. Epilepsy was present in all individuals with missense variants, often manifesting as treatment-resistant infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Microcephaly was also common in this group. Haploinsufficiency versus gain-of-function or dominant-negative effects specific to these missense variants in KMT2E might explain this divergence in phenotype, but requires independent validation. Disruptive variants in KMT2E are an under-recognized cause of neurodevelopmental abnormalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.03.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6556837PMC
June 2019

De Novo Missense Substitutions in the Gene Encoding CDK8, a Regulator of the Mediator Complex, Cause a Syndromic Developmental Disorder.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 04 21;104(4):709-720. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit, the Institute of Cancer Research, London SM2 5NG, UK. Electronic address:

The Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved, multi-subunit complex that regulates multiple steps of transcription. Mediator activity is regulated by the reversible association of a four-subunit module comprising CDK8 or CDK19 kinases, together with cyclin C, MED12 or MED12L, and MED13 or MED13L. Mutations in MED12, MED13, and MED13L were previously identified in syndromic developmental disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Here, we report CDK8 mutations (located at 13q12.13) that cause a phenotypically related disorder. Using whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing, and by international collaboration, we identified eight different heterozygous missense CDK8 substitutions, including 10 shown to have arisen de novo, in 12 unrelated subjects; a recurrent mutation, c.185C>T (p.Ser62Leu), was present in five individuals. All predicted substitutions localize to the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase domain. Affected individuals have overlapping phenotypes characterized by hypotonia, mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioral disorders, and variable facial dysmorphism. Congenital heart disease occurred in six subjects; additional features present in multiple individuals included agenesis of the corpus callosum, ano-rectal malformations, seizures, and hearing or visual impairments. To evaluate the functional impact of the mutations, we measured phosphorylation at STAT1-Ser727, a known CDK8 substrate, in a CDK8 and CDK19 CRISPR double-knockout cell line transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant CDK8 constructs. These experiments demonstrated a reduction in STAT1 phosphorylation by all mutants, in most cases to a similar extent as in a kinase-dead control. We conclude that missense mutations in CDK8 cause a developmental disorder that has phenotypic similarity to syndromes associated with mutations in other subunits of the Mediator kinase module, indicating probable overlap in pathogenic mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451695PMC
April 2019

Missense Variants in the Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Component Gene TRRAP Cause Autism and Syndromic Intellectual Disability.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 03 28;104(3):530-541. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.

Acetylation of the lysine residues in histones and other DNA-binding proteins plays a major role in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. This process is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs/KATs) found in multiprotein complexes that are recruited to chromatin by the scaffolding subunit transformation/transcription domain-associated protein (TRRAP). TRRAP is evolutionarily conserved and is among the top five genes intolerant to missense variation. Through an international collaboration, 17 distinct de novo or apparently de novo variants were identified in TRRAP in 24 individuals. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with two distinct clinical spectra. The first is a complex, multi-systemic syndrome associated with various malformations of the brain, heart, kidneys, and genitourinary system and characterized by a wide range of intellectual functioning; a number of affected individuals have intellectual disability (ID) and markedly impaired basic life functions. Individuals with this phenotype had missense variants clustering around the c.3127G>A p.(Ala1043Thr) variant identified in five individuals. The second spectrum manifested with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and/or ID and epilepsy. Facial dysmorphism was seen in both groups and included upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthus, telecanthus, a wide nasal bridge and ridge, a broad and smooth philtrum, and a thin upper lip. RNA sequencing analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals skin fibroblasts showed significant changes in the expression of several genes implicated in neuronal function and ion transport. Thus, we describe here the clinical spectrum associated with TRRAP pathogenic missense variants, and we suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation useful for clinical evaluation of the pathogenicity of the variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407527PMC
March 2019

De novo variants in HK1 associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities and visual impairment.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 07 18;27(7):1081-1089. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Hexokinase 1 (HK1) phosphorylates glucose to glucose-6-phosphate, the first rate-limiting step in glycolysis. Homozygous and heterozygous variants in HK1 have been shown to cause autosomal recessive non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, autosomal recessive Russe type hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We report seven patients from six unrelated families with a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, structural brain abnormality, and visual impairments in whom we identified four novel, de novo missense variants in the N-terminal half of HK1. Hexokinase activity in red blood cells of two patients was normal, suggesting that the disease mechanism is not due to loss of hexokinase enzymatic activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0366-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777464PMC
July 2019

2.5 years' experience of GeneMatcher data-sharing: a powerful tool for identifying new genes responsible for rare diseases.

Genet Med 2019 07 19;21(7):1657-1661. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

UMR1231 GAD, Inserm-Université Bourgogne-Franche Comté, Dijon, France.

Purpose: Exome sequencing (ES) powerfully identifies the molecular bases of heterogeneous conditions such as intellectual disability and/or multiple congenital anomalies (ID/MCA). Current ES analysis, combining diagnosis analysis restricted to disease-causing genes reported in OMIM database and subsequent research investigation extended to other genes, indicated causal and candidate genes around 40% and 10%. Nonconclusive results are frequent in such ultrarare conditions that recurrence and genotype-phenotype correlations are limited. International data-sharing permits the gathering of additional patients carrying variants in the same gene to draw definitive conclusions on their implication as disease causing. Several web-based tools have been developed and grouped in Matchmaker Exchange. In this study, we report our current experience as a regional center that has implemented ES as a first-line diagnostic test since 2013, working with a research laboratory devoted to disease gene identification.

Methods: We used GeneMatcher over 2.5 years to share 71 novel candidate genes identified by ES.

Results: Matches occurred in 60/71 candidate genes allowing to confirm the implication of 39% of matched genes as causal and to rule out 6% of them.

Conclusion: The introduction of user-friendly gene-matching tools, such as GeneMatcher, appeared to be an essential step for the rapid identification of novel disease genes responsible for ID/MCA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-018-0383-zDOI Listing
July 2019

NBEA: Developmental disease gene with early generalized epilepsy phenotypes.

Ann Neurol 2018 11 25;84(5):788-795. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

NBEA is a candidate gene for autism, and de novo variants have been reported in neurodevelopmental disease (NDD) cohorts. However, NBEA has not been rigorously evaluated as a disease gene, and associated phenotypes have not been delineated. We identified 24 de novo NBEA variants in patients with NDD, establishing NBEA as an NDD gene. Most patients had epilepsy with onset in the first few years of life, often characterized by generalized seizure types, including myoclonic and atonic seizures. Our data show a broader phenotypic spectrum than previously described, including a myoclonic-astatic epilepsy-like phenotype in a subset of patients. Ann Neurol 2018;84:796-803.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249120PMC
November 2018

De novo missense variants in MEIS2 recapitulate the microdeletion phenotype of cardiac and palate abnormalities, developmental delay, intellectual disability and dysmorphic features.

Am J Med Genet A 2018 09 28;176(9):1845-1851. Epub 2018 Jul 28.

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Gross deletions involving the MEIS2 gene have been described in a small number of patients with overlapping phenotypes of atrial or ventricular septal defects, cleft palate, and variable developmental delays and intellectual disability. Non-specific dysmorphic features were noted in some patients, including broad forehead with high anterior hairline, arched eyebrows, thin or tented upper lip, and short philtrum. Recently, a patient with a de novo single amino acid deletion, c.998_1000delGAA (p.Arg333del), and a patient with a de novo nonsense variant, (c.611C>G, p.Ser204*), were reported with a similar, but apparently more severe phenotypes. Clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) performed at our clinical molecular diagnostic laboratory identified four additional patients with predicted damaging de novo MEIS2 missense variants. Our patients' features closely resembled those previously reported in patients with gross deletions, but also included some less commonly reported features, such as autism spectrum disorder, hearing loss, and short stature, as well as features that may be unique to nucleotide-level variants, such as hypotonia, failure to thrive, gastrointestinal, skeletal, limb, and skin abnormalities. All of the observed missense variants, Pro302Leu, Gln322Leu, Arg331Lys, and Val335Ala, are located in the functionally important MEIS2 homeodomain. Pro302Leu is found in the region between helix 1 and helix 2, while the other three are located in the DNA-binding helix 3. To our knowledge, these are the first described de novo missense variants in MEIS2, expanding the known mutation spectrum of the newly recognized human disorder caused by aberrations in this gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.40368DOI Listing
September 2018

Recessive mutations in ATP8A2 cause severe hypotonia, cognitive impairment, hyperkinetic movement disorders and progressive optic atrophy.

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2018 05 31;13(1):86. Epub 2018 May 31.

Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8, Canada.

Background: ATP8A2 mutations have recently been described in several patients with severe, early-onset hypotonia and cognitive impairment. The aim of our study was to characterize the clinical phenotype of patients with ATP8A2 mutations.

Methods: An observational study was conducted at multiple diagnostic centres. Clinical data is presented from 9 unreported and 2 previously reported patients with ATP8A2 mutations. We compare their features with 3 additional patients that have been previously reported in the medical literature.

Results: Eleven patients with biallelic ATP8A2 mutations were identified, with a mean age of 9.4 years (range 2.5-28 years). All patients with ATP8A2 mutations (100%) demonstrated developmental delay, severe hypotonia and movement disorders, specifically chorea or choreoathetosis (100%), dystonia (27%) and facial dyskinesia (18%). Optic atrophy was observed in 78% of patients for whom funduscopic examination was performed. Symptom onset in all (100%) was noted before 6 months of age, with 70% having symptoms noted at birth. Feeding difficulties were common (91%) although most patients were able to tolerate pureed or thickened feeds, and 3 patients required gastrostomy tube insertion. MRI of the brain was normal in 50% of the patients. A smaller proportion was noted to have mild cortical atrophy (30%), delayed myelination (20%) and/or hypoplastic optic nerves (20%). Functional studies were performed on differentiated induced pluripotent cells from one child, which confirmed a decrease in ATP8A2 expression compared to control cells.

Conclusions: ATP8A2 gene mutations have emerged as the cause of a novel neurological phenotype characterized by global developmental delays, severe hypotonia and hyperkinetic movement disorders, the latter being an important distinguishing feature. Optic atrophy is common and may only become apparent in the first few years of life, necessitating repeat ophthalmologic evaluation in older children. Early recognition of the cardinal features of this condition will facilitate diagnosis of this complex neurologic disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-018-0825-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048855PMC
May 2018

A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 05 12;102(5):995-1007. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, 9700 RB Groningen, the Netherlands.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) represent a large clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental diseases. The identification of pathogenic genetic variants in DEEs remains crucial for deciphering this complex group and for accurately caring for affected individuals (clinical diagnosis, genetic counseling, impacting medical, precision therapy, clinical trials, etc.). Whole-exome sequencing and intensive data sharing identified a recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense variant in 14 unrelated individuals. Their phenotype was characterized by epilepsy, global developmental delay with or without autism, common cerebellar dysgenesis, and facial dysmorphism. Mixed focal and generalized epilepsy occurred in the neonatal period, controlled with difficulty in the first year, but many improved in early childhood. PACS2 is an important PACS1 paralog and encodes a multifunctional sorting protein involved in nuclear gene expression and pathway traffic regulation. Both proteins harbor cargo(furin)-binding regions (FBRs) that bind cargo proteins, sorting adaptors, and cellular kinase. Compared to the defined PACS1 recurrent variant series, individuals with PACS2 variant have more consistently neonatal/early-infantile-onset epilepsy that can be challenging to control. Cerebellar abnormalities may be similar but PACS2 individuals exhibit a pattern of clear dysgenesis ranging from mild to severe. Functional studies demonstrated that the PACS2 recurrent variant reduces the ability of the predicted autoregulatory domain to modulate the interaction between the PACS2 FBR and client proteins, which may disturb cellular function. These findings support the causality of this recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense in DEEs with facial dysmorphim and cerebellar dysgenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.03.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986694PMC
May 2018

Recessive mutations in VPS13D cause childhood onset movement disorders.

Ann Neurol 2018 06 10;83(6):1089-1095. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Department of Pediatrics, Saint Justine University Hospital Center and University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

VPS13 protein family members VPS13A through VPS13C have been associated with various recessive movement disorders. We describe the first disease association of rare recessive VPS13D variants including frameshift, missense, and partial duplication mutations with a novel complex, hyperkinetic neurological disorder. The clinical features include developmental delay, a childhood onset movement disorder (chorea, dystonia, or tremor), and progressive spastic ataxia or paraparesis. Characteristic brain magnetic resonance imaging shows basal ganglia or diffuse white matter T2 hyperintensities as seen in Leigh syndrome and choreoacanthocytosis. Muscle biopsy in 1 case showed mitochondrial aggregates and lipidosis, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings underline the importance of the VPS13 complex in neurological diseases and a possible role in mitochondrial function. Ann Neurol 2018;83:1089-1095.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25204DOI Listing
June 2018

De novo variants in Myelin regulatory factor (MYRF) as candidates of a new syndrome of cardiac and urogenital anomalies.

Am J Med Genet A 2018 04 15;176(4):969-972. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Division of Human Genetics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Myelin Regulatory Factor (MYRF) is a transcription factor that has previously been associated with the control of the expression of myelin-related genes. However, it is highly expressed in human tissues and mouse embryonic tissues outside the nervous system such as the stomach, lung, and small intestine. It has not previously been reported as a cause of any Mendelian disease. We report here two males with Scimitar syndrome [MIM 106700], and other features including penoscrotal hypospadias, cryptorchidism, pulmonary hypoplasia, tracheal anomalies, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, cleft spleen, thymic involution, and thyroid fibrosis. Gross neurologic functioning appears to be within normal limits. In both individuals a de novo variant in MYRF was identified using exome sequencing. Neither variant is found in gnomAD. Heterozygous variants in MYRF should be considered in patients with variants of Scimitar syndrome and urogenital anomalies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38620DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5867271PMC
April 2018

Mutations in the PH Domain of DNM1 are associated with a nonepileptic phenotype characterized by developmental delay and neurobehavioral abnormalities.

Mol Genet Genomic Med 2018 03 4;6(2):294-300. Epub 2018 Feb 4.

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Background: Dynamin 1 is a protein involved in the synaptic vesicle cycle, which facilitates the exocytosis of neurotransmitters necessary for normal signaling and development in the central nervous system. Pathogenic variants in DNM1 have been implicated in global developmental delay (DD), severe intellectual disability (ID), and notably, epileptic encephalopathy. All previously reported DNM1 pathogenic variants causing this severe phenotype occur in the GTPase and Middle domains of the dynamin 1 protein.

Methods: We used whole-exome sequencing to characterize the molecular basis of DD and autistic symptoms in two identical siblings.

Results: The twin siblings exhibit mild to moderate ID and autistic symptoms but no epileptic encephalopathy. Exome sequencing revealed a genetic variant, c.1603A>G (p.Lys535Glu), in the PH domain of dynamin 1. Previous in vitro studies showed that mutations at Lys535 inhibit endocytosis and impair PH loop binding to PIP2.

Conclusions: Our data suggest a previously undescribed milder phenotype associated with a missense genetic variant in the PH domain of dynamin 1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mgg3.362DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902389PMC
March 2018

Identification of STAC3 variants in non-Native American families with overlapping features of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome and Moebius syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 Oct 4;173(10):2763-2771. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Horstick et al. (2013) previously reported a homozygous p.Trp284Ser variant in STAC3 as the cause of Native American myopathy (NAM) in 5 Lumbee Native American families with congenital hypotonia and weakness, cleft palate, short stature, ptosis, kyphoscoliosis, talipes deformities, and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH). Here we present two non-Native American families, who were found to have STAC3 pathogenic variants. The first proband and her affected older sister are from a consanguineous Qatari family with a suspected clinical diagnosis of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome (CFZS) based on features of hypotonia, myopathic facies with generalized weakness, ptosis, normal extraocular movements, cleft palate, growth delay, and kyphoscoliosis. We identified the homozygous c.851G>C;p.Trp284Ser variant in STAC3 in both sisters. The second proband and his affected sister are from a non-consanguineous, Puerto Rican family who was evaluated for a possible diagnosis of Moebius syndrome (MBS). His features included facial and generalized weakness, minimal limitation of horizontal gaze, cleft palate, and hypotonia, and he has a history of MH. The siblings were identified to be compound heterozygous for STAC3 variants c.851G>C;p.Trp284Ser and c.763_766delCTCT;p.Leu255IlefsX58. Given the phenotypic overlap of individuals with CFZS, MBS, and NAM, we screened STAC3 in 12 individuals diagnosed with CFZS and in 50 individuals diagnosed with MBS or a congenital facial weakness disorder. We did not identify any rare coding variants in STAC3. NAM should be considered in patients presenting with facial and generalized weakness, normal or mildly abnormal extraocular movement, hypotonia, cleft palate, and scoliosis, particularly if there is a history of MH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38375DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843189PMC
October 2017

Overlapping SETBP1 gain-of-function mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and hematologic malignancies.

PLoS Genet 2017 03 27;13(3):e1006683. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Institute for Clinical Genetics, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.

Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by multiple malformations, severe neurological alterations and increased risk of malignancy. SGS is caused by de novo germline mutations clustering to a 12bp hotspot in exon 4 of SETBP1. Mutations in this hotspot disrupt a degron, a signal for the regulation of protein degradation, and lead to the accumulation of SETBP1 protein. Overlapping SETBP1 hotspot mutations have been observed recurrently as somatic events in leukemia. We collected clinical information of 47 SGS patients (including 26 novel cases) with germline SETBP1 mutations and of four individuals with a milder phenotype caused by de novo germline mutations adjacent to the SETBP1 hotspot. Different mutations within and around the SETBP1 hotspot have varying effects on SETBP1 stability and protein levels in vitro and in in silico modeling. Substitutions in SETBP1 residue I871 result in a weak increase in protein levels and mutations affecting this residue are significantly more frequent in SGS than in leukemia. On the other hand, substitutions in residue D868 lead to the largest increase in protein levels. Individuals with germline mutations affecting D868 have enhanced cell proliferation in vitro and higher incidence of cancer compared to patients with other germline SETBP1 mutations. Our findings substantiate that, despite their overlap, somatic SETBP1 mutations driving malignancy are more disruptive to the degron than germline SETBP1 mutations causing SGS. Additionally, this suggests that the functional threshold for the development of cancer driven by the disruption of the SETBP1 degron is higher than for the alteration in prenatal development in SGS. Drawing on previous studies of somatic SETBP1 mutations in leukemia, our results reveal a genotype-phenotype correlation in germline SETBP1 mutations spanning a molecular, cellular and clinical phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006683DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5386295PMC
March 2017

Variants in HNRNPH2 on the X Chromosome Are Associated with a Neurodevelopmental Disorder in Females.

Am J Hum Genet 2016 09 18;99(3):728-734. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Via whole-exome sequencing, we identified six females from independent families with a common neurodevelopmental phenotype including developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism, hypotonia, and seizures, all with de novo predicted deleterious variants in the nuclear localization signal of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein H2, encoded by HNRNPH2, a gene located on the X chromosome. Many of the females also have seizures, psychiatric co-morbidities, and orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and growth problems as well as common dysmorphic facial features. HNRNPs are a large group of ubiquitous proteins that associate with pre-mRNAs in eukaryotic cells to produce a multitude of alternatively spliced mRNA products during development and play an important role in controlling gene expression. The failure to identify affected males, the severity of the neurodevelopmental phenotype in females, and the essential role of this gene suggests that male conceptuses with these variants may not be viable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.06.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5011042PMC
September 2016
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