Publications by authors named "Aida Carballo-Fazanes"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Performing Simulated Basic Life Support without Seeing: Blind vs. Blindfolded People.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 10 13;18(20). Epub 2021 Oct 13.

CLINURSID Research Group, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Previous pilot experience has shown the ability of visually impaired and blind people (BP) to learn basic life support (BLS), but no studies have compared their abilities with blindfolded people (BFP) after participating in the same instructor-led, real-time feedback training. Twenty-nine BP and 30 BFP participated in this quasi-experimental trial. Training consisted of a 1 h theoretical and practical training session with an additional 30 min afterwards, led by nurses with prior experience in BLS training of various collectives. Quantitative quality of chest compressions (CC), AED use and BLS sequence were evaluated by means of a simulation scenario. BP's median time to start CC was less than 35 s. Global and specific components of CC quality were similar between groups, except for compression rate (BFP: 123.4 + 15.2 vs. BP: 110.8 + 15.3 CC/min; = 0.002). Mean compression depth was below the recommended target in both groups, and optimal CC depth was achieved by 27.6% of blind and 23.3% of blindfolded people ( = 0.288). Time to discharge was significantly longer in BFP than BP (86.0 + 24.9 vs. 66.0 + 27.0 s; = 0.004). Thus, after an adapted and short training program, blind people were revealed to have abilities comparable to those of blindfolded people in learning and performing the BLS sequence and CC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8536197PMC
October 2021

Let's train CPR together: mandatory cardiopulmonary resuscitation competencies for undergraduate students in healthcare and education: A step forward to train schoolteachers.

Eur J Anaesthesiol 2021 10;38(10):1106-1107

From the Faculty of Education Sciences, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain (CA-G, ), CLINURSID research group, Psychiatry, Radiology, Public Health, Nursing and Medicine Department, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain (CA-G, AC-F, AR-N), Life Support and Simulation research group, Health Research Institute of Santiago, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, Spain (CA-G, AC-F, AR-N), Faculty of Education, Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain (SL-G) and Pediatric Critical, Intermediate and Palliative Care Section, Pediatric Department, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, Spain (AR-N).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0000000000001442DOI Listing
October 2021

Paediatric residents deliver similar quality simulated neonatal resuscitation using 3:1 and 15:2 ratios.

Acta Paediatr 2021 Nov 28;110(11):3009-3010. Epub 2021 Jun 28.

Life Support and Simulation Research group of IDIS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15991DOI Listing
November 2021

KIDS SAVE LIVES in schools: cross-sectional survey of schoolteachers.

Eur J Pediatr 2021 Jul 8;180(7):2213-2221. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology, Public Health, Nursing and Medicine Department, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Training schoolchildren in basic life support (BLS) is strongly recommended to effectively increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates. Paediatricians and other health staff members used to be involved in BLS training, but the wide dissemination of BLS skills would need additional support; as a solution, schoolteachers might have enough knowledge necessary to help to achieve this goal. The aim of this cross-sectional survey study, which involved 3423 schoolteachers, was to evaluate the knowledge related to first aid (FA) and BLS of schoolteachers in Spain. In addition, the study aimed to evaluate the content taught to the schoolchildren regarding FA and teachers' attitudes towards teaching FA. Three-quarters of the surveyed schoolteachers reported knowing FA, and 17% reported teaching it. The emergency medical telephone number and CPR were the subjects taught most often by schoolteachers. However, the schoolteachers demonstrated a lack of knowledge in the identification of cardiac arrest and in CPR. Ninety-eight percent of the respondents agreed with including FA training in schools and as part of university degree programmes and supported the KIDS SAVE LIVES statement. Teaching FA was a positive predictor to be willing to perform CPR (OR: 1.7; 95% CI 1.32-2.31) and to use a defibrillator (OR: 1.4; 95% CI 1.10-1.67).Conclusions: Schoolteachers are willing to teach FA in schools. However, more training and specific curricula are needed to increase the quality of schoolchildren's CPR training. The training of schoolteachers in CPR might be the foundation for the sustainable transfer of CPR-related knowledge to schoolchildren. Therefore, the inclusion of FA and BLS in university degree programmes seems to be essential. What is Known: • Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates are associated with improved survival rates. • Resuscitation training in schools increases the bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rate. What is New: • Schoolteachers are willing to teach basic life support, but they need more and better training. • Schoolteachers agreed with the inclusion of first aid training in schools and university degree programmes aimed at training teachers/undergraduate teaching degrees.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-021-03971-xDOI Listing
July 2021

Intra-Rater (Live vs. Video Assessment) and Inter-Rater (Expert vs. Novice) Reliability of the Test of Gross Motor Development-Third Edition.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 02 9;18(4). Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

The Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD) is one of the most common tools for assessing the fundamental movement skills (FMS) in children between 3 and 10 years. This study aimed to examine the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the TGMD-3rd Edition (TGMD-3) between expert and novice raters using live and video assessment. Five raters [2 experts and 3 novices (one of them BSc in Physical Education and Sport Science)] assessed and scored the performance of the TGMD-3 of 25 healthy children [Female: 60%; mean (standard deviation) age 9.16 (1.31)]. Schoolchildren were attending at one public elementary school during the academic year 2019-2020 from Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Raters scored each children performance through two viewing moods (live and slow-motion). The ICC (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient) was used to determine the agreement between raters. Our results showed moderate-to-excellent intra-rater reliability for overall score and locomotor and ball skills subscales; moderate-to-good inter-rater reliability for overall and ball skills; and poor-to-good for locomotor subscale. Higher intra-rater reliability was achieved by the expert raters and novice rater with physical education background compared to novice raters. However, the inter-rater reliability was more variable in all the raters regardless of their experience or background. No significant differences in reliability were found when comparing live and video assessments. For clinical practice, it would be recommended that raters reach an agreement before the assessment to avoid subjective interpretations that might distort the results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041652DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7915997PMC
February 2021

Safe On-Boat Resuscitation by Lifeguards in COVID-19 Era: A Pilot Study Comparing Three Sets of Personal Protective Equipment.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2021 Apr 27;36(2):163-169. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Introduction: On-boat resuscitation can be applied by lifeguards in an inflatable rescue boat (IRB). Due to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-COV-2) and recommendations for the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), prehospital care procedures need to be re-evaluated. The objective of this study was to determine how the use of PPE influences the amount of preparation time needed before beginning actual resuscitation and the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; QCPR) on an IRB.

Methods: Three CPR tests were performed by 14 lifeguards, in teams of two, wearing different PPE: (1) Basic PPE (B-PPE): gloves, a mask, and protective glasses; (2) Full PPE (F-PPE): B-PPE + a waterproof apron; and (3) Basic PPE + plastic blanket (B+PPE). On-boat resuscitation using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter was performed sailing at 20km/hour.

Results: Using B-PPE takes less time and is significantly faster than F-PPE (B-PPE 17 [SD = 2] seconds versus F-PPE 69 [SD = 17] seconds; P = .001), and the use of B+PPE is slightly higher (B-PPE 17 [SD = 2] seconds versus B+PPE 34 [SD = 6] seconds; P = .002). The QCPR remained similar in all three scenarios (P >.05), reaching values over 79%.

Conclusion: The use of PPE during on-board resuscitation is feasible and does not interfere with quality when performed by trained lifeguards. The use of a plastic blanket could be a quick and easy alternative to offer extra protection to lifeguards during CPR on an IRB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X2100011XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7900657PMC
April 2021

The Visible Behaviour of Drowning Persons: A Pilot Observational Study Using Analytic Software and a Nominal Group Technique.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 09 22;17(18). Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Research Group Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1090 Brussels, Belgium.

Although drowning is a common phenomenon, the behaviour of drowning persons is poorly understood. The purpose of this study is to provide a quantitative and qualitative analysis of this behaviour. This was an observational study of drowning videos observed by 20 international experts in the field of water safety. For quantitative analysis, each video was analysed with Lince observation software by four participants. A Nominal Group Technique generated input for the qualitative analysis and the two principal investigators conducted a post-hoc analysis. A total of 87.5% of the 23 videos showed drowning in swimming pools, 50% of the drowned persons were male, and 58.3% were children or teenagers. Nineteen persons were rescued before unconsciousness and showed just the beginning of downing behaviour. Another five were rescued after unconsciousness, which allowed the observation of their drowning behaviour from the beginning to the end. Significant differences were found comparing both groups regarding the length of disappearances underwater, number, and length of resurfacing (resp. = 0.003, 0.016, 0.005) and the interval from the beginning of the incident to the rescue ( = 0.004). All persons drowned within 2 min. The qualitative analysis showed previously suggested behaviour patterns (immediate disappearance = 5, distress = 6, instinctive drowning response = 6, climbing ladder motion = 3) but also a striking new pattern (backward water milling = 19). This study confirms previous assumptions of drowning behaviour and provides novel evidence-based information about the large variety of visible behaviours of drowning persons. New behaviours, which mainly include high-frequency resurfacing during a struggle for less than 2 min and backward water milling, have been recognised in this study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186930DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7559254PMC
September 2020

Reliability of the test of gross motor development: A systematic review.

PLoS One 2020 16;15(7):e0236070. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Objective: To identify, synthesise and evaluate studies that investigated the reliability of the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD) variants.

Methods: A systematic search was employed to identify studies that have investigated internal consistency, inter-rater, intra-rater and test-retest reliability of the TGMD variants through Scopus, Pubmed/MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Sport Discus and Web of Science databases.

Results: Of the 265 studies identified, 23 were included. Internal consistency, evaluated in 14 studies, confirming good-to-excellent consistency for the overall score and general motor quotient (GMQ), and acceptable-to-excellent levels in both subscales (locomotor and ball skills). Inter-rater reliability, evaluated in 19 studies, showing good-to-excellent intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) values in locomotor skills score, ball skills score, overall score, and GMQ. Intra-rater reliability, evaluated in 13 studies, displaying excellent ICC values in overall score and GMQ, and good-to-excellent ICC values in locomotor skills score and ball skills score. Test-retest reliability was evaluated in 15 studies with 100% of the statistics reported above the threshold of acceptable reliability when ICC was not used. Studies with ICC statistic showed good-to-excellent values in ball skills score, overall score, and GMQ; and moderate-to-excellent values in locomotor skills score.

Conclusions: Overall, the results of this systematic review indicate that, regardless of the variant of the test, the TMGD has moderate-to-excellent internal consistency, good-to-excellent inter-rater reliability, good-to-excellent intra-rater reliability, and moderate-to-excellent test-retest reliability. Considering the few high-quality studies in terms of internal consistency, it would be recommend to carry out further studies in this field to improve their quality. Since there is no gold standard for assessing FMS, TGMD variants could be appropriate when opting for a psychometrical robust test. However, standardized training protocols for coding TGMD variants seem to be necessary both for researchers and practitioners in order to ensure acceptable reliability.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0236070PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365594PMC
September 2020

Physical Activity Habits and Determinants, Sedentary Behaviour and Lifestyle in University Students.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 05 8;17(9). Epub 2020 May 8.

Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela-CHUS, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

University students, as a result of their lifestyles, represent a section of the population that is most likely to adopt sedentary behaviours. The aim of the present study was to analyse the determining factors dictating the performance of physical activity as well as sedentary behaviour among university students. A total of 608 students (64.6% women) from the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) were selected by stratified random sampling to take part in the study, which involved completing a questionnaire on lifestyle and physical activity. Of the participating students, 69.6% indicated that they performed physical activity; the main reasons given were to maintain fitness and for health, while a lack of time and laziness were the principal reasons given for abandoning or not taking up physical exercise. Significant associations were established between not doing physical activity and the time exposed to screens, time studying, feeling low and smoking; on the other hand, associations could be seen between doing physical activity and the participation of relatives (parents, mothers, partners, older siblings and friends) in physical activity, as well as a positive sense of satisfaction relating to physical education taught in schools. In conclusion, most of the university students did some physical activity, which was associated with less sedentary behaviour, while the influence of school physical education and of the habits of relatives played an important role.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093272DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246858PMC
May 2020

[School teachers should know how and teach to save lives to the kids. The inclusion of basic life support training in university degrees whose aim is to train teachers. BLS mandatory in school & university].

An Pediatr (Engl Ed) 2020 May 10;92(5):319-320. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Grupo de Investigación CLINURSID, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Radiología, Salud Pública, Enfermería y Medicina, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Facultad de Enfermería, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Servicio de Críticos, Intermedios y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Servicio Gallego de Salud, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anpedi.2019.11.010DOI Listing
May 2020

Physiological demands of quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed at simulated 3250 meters high.

Am J Emerg Med 2020 12 24;38(12):2580-2585. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

CLINURSID Research Group, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Santiago de Compostela's Health Research Institute (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Faculty of Nursing, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Aim: To analyse the effect of oxygen fraction reduction (O2 14%, equivalent to 3250 m) on Q-CPR and rescuers' physiological demands.

Methodology: A quasi-experimental study was carried out in a sample of 9 Q-CPR proficient health care professionals. Participants, in teams of 2 people, performed 10 min CPR on a Laerdal ResusciAnne mannequin (30:2 compression/ventilation ratio and alternating roles between rescuers every 2 min) in two simulated settings: T21-CPR at sea level (FiO2 of 21%) and T14 - CPR at 3250 m altitude (FiO2 of 14%). Effort self-perception was rated from 0 (no effort) to 10 (maximum demand) points.

Results: Quality of chest compressions was good and similar in both conditions (T21 vs T14). However, the percentage of ventilations with adequate tidal volume was lower in altitude than at sea level conditions (35.9 ± 25.2% vs. 54.7 ± 23.2%, p = 0.035). The subjective perception of effort was significantly higher at simulated altitude (5 ± 2) than at sea level (3 ± 2) (p = 0.038). Maximum heart rate during the tests was similar in both conditions; however, mean oxygen saturation was significantly lower in altitude conditions (90.5 ± 2.5% vs. 99.3 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Although performing CPR under simulated hypoxic altitude conditions significantly increases the physiological demands and subjective feeling of tiredness compared to sea level CPR, trained rescuers are able to deliver good Q-CPR in such conditions, at least in the first 10 min of resuscitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2019.12.048DOI Listing
December 2020

[Knowledge and attitudes on first aid and basic life support of Primary and Preschool teachers and parents].

An Pediatr (Engl Ed) 2020 May 20;92(5):268-276. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Grupo de Investigación CLINURSID, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Radiología, Salud Pública, Enfermería y Medicina, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Facultad de Enfermería, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España; Servicio de Críticos y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of first aid (FA) of primary and pre-school teachers and the parents of children in these education stages.

Methods: A questionnaire already used in previous publications was employed and consisted of 4 sections: 1) general information; 2) assessment of FA knowledge; 3) questions about FA, and 4) attitudes about FA. The questionnaire was sent by e-mail in Google Forms format to different education centres of the Autonomous Community of Galicia. The centres were asked to send them to the school staff and parents of the pupils so that they could be completed.

Results: A total of 470 questionnaires were analysed (177 teachers; 242 parents and 51 teachers with children). More than half (268, 57%) of the participants stated to have knowledge of FA. In the case of the teachers, a relationship was found between having this information and teaching these contained in the classroom (P=.008). Only 4 participants managed to arrange the basic life support sequence, and none of them correctly answered the questions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. More than 95% of the sample considered it necessary to include FA in the school curriculum and in the study plans of degrees destined for teacher training.

Conclusions: The majority of teachers and parents had training in FA, although none of them responded correctly to the questions related to basic life support. The inclusion of these contents in school curricula would be recommendable, but it requires training the teaching staff beforehand. The inclusion of these contents in university study plans should be a measure to take into account.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anpedi.2019.10.010DOI Listing
May 2020

Two new chest compression methods might challenge the standard in a simulated infant model.

Eur J Pediatr 2019 Oct 24;178(10):1529-1535. Epub 2019 Aug 24.

CLINURSID research group of the University of Santiago de Compostela and Life Support and Simulation research group of the Health Research Institute of Santiago (FIDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Paediatric cardiorespiratory arrest is a rare event that requires a fast, quality intervention. High-quality chest compressions are an essential prognostic factor. The aim of this prospective, randomized and crossover study in infant manikin 2-min cardiorespiratory resuscitation scenario is to quantitatively compare the quality of the currently recommended method in infants (two-thumb-encircling hand techniques) with two new methods (the new two-thumb and the knocking-fingers techniques) using a 15:2 compression-to-ventilation ratio. Ten qualified health professionals were recruited. Variables analysed were mean rate and the ratio of compressions in the recommended rate range, mean depth and the ratio of compressions within the depth range recommendations, ratio of compressions with adequate chest release and ratio of compressions performed with the fingers in the correct position. Ratios of correct compressions for depth, rate, chest release and hand position were always above 70% regardless of the technique used. Reached mean depth and mean rate were similar to the 3 techniques. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the variables analysed.Conclusion: In an infant manikin, professionals are able to perform chest compressions with the new techniques with similar quality to that obtained with the standard method. What is Known: • Quality chest compressions are an essential prognostic factor in paediatric cardiorespiratory arrest. • It has been reported poor results when studied cardiorespiratory resuscitation quality in infants applying the recommended methods. What is New: • In a simulated scenario, quality of chest compressions performed with two new techniques (nTTT and KF) is similar to that obtained with the currently recommended method (TTHT).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-019-03452-2DOI Listing
October 2019

[Being an amateur runner is related to good eating habits?]

Gac Sanit 2020 Jan - Feb;34(1):97. Epub 2019 Aug 16.

Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela (A Coruña), España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaceta.2019.05.017DOI Listing
November 2020

CArdiac REhabilitation and BAsic life Support, the CAREBAS project. Training cardiac patients to save lives: A six-month follow up study.

Resuscitation 2019 06;139:373-375

CLINURSID Research Group, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Institute of Health Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain; Cardiology Department, University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela (CIBER-CV), Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.03.049DOI Listing
June 2019

Could mobile apps improve laypeople AED use?

Resuscitation 2019 07 30;140:159-160. Epub 2019 May 30.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; CLINURSID Research Group, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Paediatric Emergency and Critical Care Division, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS) and SAMID-II Network, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.05.029DOI Listing
July 2019

[Basic life support knowledge of the future of the Infant and Primary School teacher. An unresolved problem in university study plans?]

An Pediatr (Engl Ed) 2019 Nov 27;91(5):344-345. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Grupo de Investigación CLINURSID, Departamento de Psiquiatría Radiología, Salud Pública, Enfermería y Medicina, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España; Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España; Servicio de Críticos y Urgencias Pediátricas, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela, España; Facultad de Enfermería, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anpedi.2018.10.010DOI Listing
November 2019
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