Publications by authors named "Aiai Zhang"

5 Publications

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QTLs and candidate genes analyses for fruit size under domestication and differentiation in melon (Cucumis melo L.) based on high resolution maps.

BMC Plant Biol 2021 Mar 3;21(1):126. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Horticultural Crops of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100081, Beijing, China.

Background: Melon is a very important horticultural crop produced worldwide with high phenotypic diversity. Fruit size is among the most important domestication and differentiation traits in melon. The molecular mechanisms of fruit size in melon are largely unknown.

Results: Two high-density genetic maps were constructed by whole-genome resequencing with two F segregating populations (WAP and MAP) derived from two crosses (cultivated agrestis × wild agrestis and cultivated melo × cultivated agrestis). We obtained 1,871,671 and 1,976,589 high quality SNPs that show differences between parents in WAP and MAP. A total of 5138 and 5839 recombination events generated 954 bins in WAP and 1027 bins in MAP with the average size of 321.3 Kb and 301.4 Kb respectively. All bins were mapped onto 12 linkage groups in WAP and MAP. The total lengths of two linkage maps were 904.4 cM (WAP) and 874.5 cM (MAP), covering 86.6% and 87.4% of the melon genome. Two loci for fruit size were identified on chromosome 11 in WAP and chromosome 5 in MAP, respectively. An auxin response factor and a YABBY transcription factor were inferred to be the candidate genes for both loci.

Conclusion: The high-resolution genetic maps and QTLs analyses for fruit size described here will provide a better understanding the genetic basis of domestication and differentiation, and provide a valuable tool for map-based cloning and molecular marker assisted breeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-021-02904-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931605PMC
March 2021

Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses reveal that melatonin promotes melon root development under copper stress by inhibiting jasmonic acid biosynthesis.

Hortic Res 2020 1;7:79. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100081 Beijing, China.

Melatonin has been shown to alleviate the effects of abiotic stress and to regulate plant development. Copper, a common heavy metal and soil pollutant, can suppress plant growth and development. In this work, we explored the protective effects of exogenous melatonin on lateral root formation in response to copper stress using melon seeds subjected to three germination treatments: CK1 (control), CK2 (300 μmol/L CuSO), and MT3 (300 μmol/L melatonin + 300 μmol/L CuSO). Melatonin pretreatment increased the antioxidant enzyme activities and root vigor, and decreased the proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in the roots of copper-stressed melon seedlings. We then used transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the mechanisms by which exogenous melatonin protects against copper stress. There were 70 significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (28 upregulated, 42 downregulated) and 318 significantly differentially expressed metabolites (DEMs) (168 upregulated, 150 downregulated) between the MT3 and CK2 treatments. Melatonin pretreatment altered the expression of genes related to redox and cell wall formation processes. In addition, we found that members of the AP2/ERF, BBR/BPC, GRAS, and HD-ZIP transcription factor families may have vital roles in lateral root development. Melatonin also increased the level of Glutathione (GSH), which chelates excess Cu. The combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis revealed DEGs and DEMs involved in jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, including four lipoxygenase-related genes and two metabolites (linoleic acid and lecithin) related to melatonin's alleviation effect on copper toxicity. This research elucidated the molecular mechanisms of melatonin's protective effects in copper-stressed melon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41438-020-0293-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7261800PMC
June 2020

Probing Heteroatomic Dopant-Activity Synergy over CoO/Doped Carbon Nanotube Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

Inorg Chem 2020 Jan 13;59(1):403-414. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Physics of Rare Earth Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering , Inner Mongolia University , Hohhot 010021 , China.

Understanding and predicting how heteroatomic dopants of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based catalysts alter their catalytic performance at nanoscale is essential to design superior electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This report describes findings of an investigation of the heteroatomic dopant-activity relationship for CoO/doped CNTs catalysts with different heteroatoms including N, O, and P atoms in ORR. By using an array of techniques to probe the structure and elementary valence of the catalysts, the incorporation of the CoO nanoparticles can introduce defects into the doped CNTs, especially the N-CNTs, which should contribute to the generation of active sites. The CoO/N-CNTs are shown to exhibit both the highest ORR activity and stability compared with CoO/O-CNTs, CoO/P-CNTs, and CoO/CNTs, manifesting the synergistic correlation of CoO nanoparticles, heteroatoms, and CNTs. This kind of synergy is assessed by density functional theory calculations based on the electronic properties and molecular orbitals. It is found that N, O, or P atoms can tune the charge distribution of CNTs by decreasing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital-highest occupied molecular orbital energy gap, thus activating the adjacent C atoms. And the addition of CoO will further redistribute the charge of CNTs from CNTs to CoO toward enhanced ORR activity. Moreover, the CoO/N-CNTs catalyst exhibits a maximum structural stability due to the strong electronic interaction between Co ions and N atoms, which is believed to result in its high ORR stability. Analysis of the results, along with a combined theoretical and experimental study, has provided implications for the design of catalysts with controlled activity and stability for ORR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b02663DOI Listing
January 2020

Plasma miR-22-5p, miR-132-5p, and miR-150-3p Are Associated with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

Biomed Res Int 2019 24;2019:5012648. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province 075000, China.

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases. Our study aimed to determine whether miR-22-5p, miR-132-5p, and miR-150-3p represent novel biomarkers for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Plasma samples were isolated from 35 AMI patients and 55 matched controls. Total RNA was extracted, and quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were performed to investigate the expressions of miRNAs and cardiac troponin I (cTnI), respectively. We found that plasma levels of miR-22-5p and miR-150-3p were significantly higher during the early stage of AMI and their expression levels peaked earlier than cTnI. Conversely, circulating miR-132-5p was sustained at a low level during the early phase of AMI. All three circulating miRNAs were correlated with plasma cTnI levels. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis suggested that each single miRNA had considerable diagnostic efficacy for AMI. Moreover, combining the three miRNAs improved their diagnostic efficacy. Furthermore, neither heparin nor medications for coronary heart disease (CHD) affected plasma levels of miR-22-5p and miR-132-5p, but circulating miR-150-3p was downregulated by medications for CHD. We concluded that plasma miR-22-5p, miR-132-5p, and miR-150-3p may serve as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for early diagnosis of AMI. Moreover, a panel consisting of these three miRNAs may achieve a higher diagnostic value.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/5012648DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6507259PMC
November 2019

The phyllosphere indigenous microbiota of Brassica campestris L. change its diversity in responding to di-n-butyl phthalate pollution.

World J Microbiol Biotechnol 2019 Jan 17;35(2):21. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China.

In this study, the effects of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) on the phyllosphere bacterial community of field mustard (Brassica campestris L.) at the five-leaf stage were investigated. The indigenous alpha-diversity of the phyllosphere bacteria was altered after spraying with different concentrations of DBP. Shannon diversity indices were significantly changed on day 5 after treatment at DBP concentrations > 400 mg L (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the difference between treatment and control was not significant on day 9 after DBP treatment (P > 0.05). Exposure to DBP resulted in a decrease in Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, and an increase in Actinobacteria at all sampling intervals. These changes included significant increases in the relative abundance of Paracoccus and Rhodococcus, and significant decreases in that of Pseudomonas, Exiguobacterium, an unclassified genus of Pseudomonadaceae, and an unclassified genus of Enterobacteriaceae. This study provides new evidence for the possibility of using phyllosphere microbiota to remediate DBP contamination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11274-019-2589-xDOI Listing
January 2019