Publications by authors named "Ahmed M Abdel-Azeem"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microbial polysaccharides: An emerging family of natural biomaterials for cancer therapy and diagnostics.

Semin Cancer Biol 2021 May 29. Epub 2021 May 29.

Pharmacology Division, CSIR-National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226001, India. Electronic address:

Microbial polysaccharides (MPs) offer immense diversity in structural and functional properties. They are extensively used in advance biomedical science owing to their superior biodegradability, hemocompatibility, and capability to imitate the natural extracellular matrix microenvironment. Ease in tailoring, inherent bio-activity, distinct mucoadhesiveness, ability to absorb hydrophobic drugs, and plentiful availability of MPs make them prolific green biomaterials to overcome the significant constraints of cancer chemotherapeutics. Many studies have demonstrated their application to obstruct tumor development and extend survival through immune activation, apoptosis induction, and cell cycle arrest by MPs. Synoptic investigations of MPs are compulsory to decode applied basics in recent inclinations towards cancer regimens. The current review focuses on the anticancer properties of commercially available and newly explored MPs, and outlines their direct and indirect mode of action. The review also highlights cutting-edge MPs-based drug delivery systems to augment the specificity and efficiency of available chemotherapeutics, as well as their emerging role in theranostics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2021.05.021DOI Listing
May 2021

(Agaricomycetes, Hymenochaetaceae) in Brazilian Cerrado: Expanding Its Geographic Distribution and Host List.

Front Microbiol 2021 9;12:647920. Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Basic, Applied and Scientific Dissemination Micology Laboratory (FungiLab), Goiás State University, Anápolis, Brazil.

(Pat.) Reid (Agaricomycetes: Hymenochaetaceae) is a poroid fungus characterized by the expressive production of chlamydospores, and , especially during its anamorphic stage. The species plays important ecological roles, standing out as a phytopathogen, affecting several species of ornamental and wild trees, mainly in tropical and subtropical regions. The infected trees develop canker and white rot of the wood, showing symptoms of reduced vegetative vigor and decline of leaves and branches which causes death in some cases. The first record of for the Cerrado biome (Brazilian Savanna) and the first record as causal agent of canker in L. in Brazil is reported here. In addition, we present a checklist of its worldwide geographical distribution and known hosts, from an extensive bibliographic search in Google Scholar, SciELO, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. The species is widespread in tropical and subtropical zones; common in the American continent, especially in Central and South America and the Mediterranean region, and rare in temperate zones. We found specimens growing in both living and dead hosts, totalizing 70 species of hosts, distributed in 43 genera and 22 families. Of these, L. (10.5%), L. (6.5%), and (Aiton) Willd. (4.8%), and the Fabaceae (30%), Fagaceae (10%), and Sapindaceae (8.6%) families were the most frequent. We present morphological descriptions and illustrations, as well as the growth characteristics in culture medium. Our study expands the known geographical distribution of , including the Cerrado biome, as well as its structural, physiological characteristics, and its hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.647920DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7985186PMC
March 2021

Biological Nanofactories: Using Living Forms for Metal Nanoparticle Synthesis.

Mini Rev Med Chem 2021 ;21(2):245-265

Department of Botany, Mahatma Gandhi Central University, Motihari, Bihar, India.

Metal nanoparticles are nanosized entities with dimensions of 1-100 nm that are increasingly in demand due to applications in diverse fields like electronics, sensing, environmental remediation, oil recovery and drug delivery. Metal nanoparticles possess large surface energy and properties different from bulk materials due to their small size, large surface area with free dangling bonds and higher reactivity. High cost and pernicious effects associated with the chemical and physical methods of nanoparticle synthesis are gradually paving the way for biological methods due to their eco-friendly nature. Considering the vast potentiality of microbes and plants as sources, biological synthesis can serve as a green technique for the synthesis of nanoparticles as an alternative to conventional methods. A number of reviews are available on green synthesis of nanoparticles but few have focused on covering the entire biological agents in this process. Therefore present paper describes the use of various living organisms like bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and tracheophytes in the biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles, the mechanisms involved and the advantages associated therein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389557520999201116163012DOI Listing
January 2021

L. Shrubs Provide Species-Specific Facilitation for the Understory Plants in Coastal Ecosystem.

Biology (Basel) 2020 Aug 17;9(8). Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, Egypt.

Plant facilitation has a pivotal role in regulating species coexistence, particularly under arid environments. The present study aimed to evaluate the facilitative effect of L. on its understory plants in coastal habitat. Forty shrubs were investigated and the environmental data (soil temperature, moisture, pH, salinity, carbon and nitrogen content, and light intensity), vegetation composition, and diversity of associated species were recorded under- and outside canopies. Eight of the most frequent understory species were selected for evaluating their response to the facilitative effect of . Bioactive ingredients of roots were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and mycorrhizal biodiversity in their rhizosphere soil was also assessed. The effect of on understory plants ranged between facilitation and inhibition in an age-dependent manner. Old shrubs facilitated 18 and inhibited 18 associated species, while young shrubs facilitated 13 and inhibited 9 species. ameliorated solar radiation and high-temperature stresses for the under canopy plants. Moreover, soil moisture was increased by 509.52% and 85.71%, while salinity was reduced by 47.62% and 23.81% under old and young shrubs, respectively. Soil contents of C and N were increased under canopy. This change in the microenvironment led to photosynthetic pigments induction in the majority of understory species. However, anthocyanin, proline contents, and antioxidant enzyme activities were reduced in plants under canopy. Thirteen mycorrhizal fungal species were identified in the rhizospheric soil of with the predominance of . Thirty-one compounds were identified in root extract in which pyrogallol and palmitic acid, which have antimicrobial and allelopathic activities, were the major components. The obtained results demonstrated that facilitation provided by is mediated with multiple mechanisms and included a set of interrelated scenarios that took place in a species-specific manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biology9080232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464817PMC
August 2020

Enhancement of disease resistance, growth potential, and photosynthesis in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) by inoculation with an endophytic actinobacterium, Streptomyces thermocarboxydus strain BPSAC147.

PLoS One 2019 3;14(7):e0219014. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Department of Biotechnology, Mizoram University, Aizawl, Mizoram, India.

Biotic stresses in plants have a significant impact on agricultural productivity. In the present study, in vivo experiments were conducted to determine the physiological responses of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings by inoculation with an endophytic actinobacterium, Streptomyces thermocarboxydus isolate BPSAC147 under greenhouse conditions. Further, photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching (qP) and non-photochemical (NPQ) were calculated in seedlings inoculated with S. thermocarboxydus (T1) and were compared with control (T0) plants. Furthermore, the electron transport rate (ETR) of PSII exhibited a significant increase in T1 plants, relative to T0 plants. These results indicate that inoculation of tomato seedlings with S. thermocarboxydus had a positive effect on the process of photosynthesis, resulting in enhanced chlorophyll fluorescence parameters due to increased ETR in the thylakoid membrane. GC-MS analysis showed significant differences in the volatile compounds in the different treatments performed under greenhouse conditions. The present study suggests that S. thermocarboxydus can be used as new biocontrol agent to control Fusarium wilt in tomato crops and enhance productivity by enhancing photosynthesis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0219014PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6608948PMC
March 2020

Assessment of biodegradation in ancient archaeological wood from the Middle Cemetery at Abydos, Egypt.

PLoS One 2019 27;14(3):e0213753. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, United States of America.

Abydos is a large, complex archaeological site located approximately 500 km south of Cairo in Upper Egypt. The site has served as a cemetery for thousands of years and is where most of the Early Dynastic royal tombs are located. North Abydos includes the Middle Cemetery and the North Cemetery, which are separated from each other by a wadi. The Middle Cemetery was the burial ground for important Sixth Dynasty (2407-2260 BC) officials and over time for thousands of elite and non-elite individuals as well. Excavations at the core area of the Old Kingdom mortuary landscape have revealed many culturally important wooden objects but these are often found with extensive deterioration that can compromise their preservation. The objectives of this study were to characterize the biodegradation that has taken place in excavated wooden objects, elucidate the type of wood degradation present, obtain information on soil properties at the site and identify fungi currently associated with the wood and soils. Light and scanning electron microscopy studies were used to observe the micromorphological characteristics of the wood, and culturing on different media was done to isolate fungi. Identification of the fungi was done by examining morphological characteristics and extracting rDNA from pure cultures and sequencing the ITS region. Wooden objects, made from Cedrus, Juniperus and Acacia as well as several unidentified hardwoods, were found with extensive degradation and were exceedingly fragile. Termite damage was evident and frass from the subterranean termites along with sand particles were present in most woods. Evidence of soft rot attack was found in sections of wood that remained. Fungi isolated from wood and soils were identified as species of Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Penicillium, Stemphylium Talaromyces and Trichoderma. Results provide important information on the current condition of the wood and gives insights to the identity of the fungi in wood and soils at the site. These results provide needed information to help develop conservation plans to preserve these degraded and fragile wooden objects.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0213753PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436709PMC
December 2019

Chrysophanol: A Natural Anthraquinone with Multifaceted Biotherapeutic Potential.

Biomolecules 2019 02 18;9(2). Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, ERA Chair of Green Chemistry, Tallinn University of Technology, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia.

Chrysophanol is a unique anthraquinone having broad-spectrum therapeutic potential along with ecological importance. It is the first polyketide that has been reported to be biosynthesized in an organism-specific manner. The traditional Chinese and Korean medicinal systems provide evidence of the beneficial effects of chrysophanol on human health. The global distribution of chrysophanol encountered in two domains of life (bacteria and eukaryota) has motivated researchers to critically evaluate the properties of this compound. A plethora of literature is available on the pharmacological properties of chrysophanol, which include anticancer, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, antiulcer, and antimicrobial activities. However, the pharmacokinetics and toxicity studies on chrysophanol demand further investigations for it to be used as a drug. This is the first comprehensive review on the natural sources, biosynthetic pathways, and pharmacology of chrysophanol. Here we reviewed recent advancements made on the pharmacokinetics of the chrysophanol. Additionally, we have highlighted the knowledge gaps of its mechanism of action against diseases and toxicity aspects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom9020068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6406798PMC
February 2019

Arbuscular mycorrhizal strategy for zinc mycoremediation and diminished translocation to shoots and grains in wheat.

PLoS One 2017 16;12(11):e0188220. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

Mycoremediation is an on-site remediation strategy, which employs fungi to degrade or sequester contaminants from the environment. The present work focused on the bioremediation of soils contaminated with zinc by the use of a native mycorrhizal fungi (AM) called Funneliformis geosporum (Nicol. & Gerd.) Walker & Schüßler. Experiments were performed using Triticum aestivum L. cv. Gemmeza-10 at different concentrations of Zn (50, 100, 200 mg kg-1) and inoculated with or without F. geosporum. The results showed that the dry weight of mycorrhizal wheat increased at Zn stressed plants as compared to the non-Zn-stressed control plants. The concentrations of Zn also had an inhibitory effect on the yield of dry root and shoot of non-mycorrhizal wheat. The photosynthetic pigment fractions were significantly affected by Zn treatments and mycorrhizal inoculation, where in all treatments, the content of the photosynthetic pigment fractions decreased as the Zn concentration increased in the soil. However, the level of minerals of shoots, roots, and grains was greatly influenced by Zn-treatment and by inoculation with F. geosporum. Treatment with Zn in the soil increased Cu and Zn concentrations in the root, shoot and grains, however, other minerals (P, S, K, Ca and Fe) concentration was decreased. Inoculation of wheat with AM fungi significantly reduced the accumulation of Zn and depressed its translocation in shoots and grains of wheat. In conclusion, inoculation with a native F. geosporum-improves yields of wheat under higher levels of Zn and is possible to be applied for the improvement of zinc contaminated soil.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0188220PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5690681PMC
December 2017

Anti-rheumatoid Activity of Secondary Metabolites Produced by Endophytic .

Front Microbiol 2016 20;7:1477. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

Histology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University Ismailia, Egypt.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-rheumatoid activity of secondary metabolites produced by endophytic mycobiota in Egypt. A total of 27 endophytic fungi were isolated from 10 dominant medicinal plant host species in Wadi Tala, Saint Katherine Protectorate, arid Sinai, Egypt. Of those taxa, seven isolates of (CG1-CG7), being the most frequent taxon, were recovered from seven different host plants and screened for production of active anti-inflammatory metabolites. Isolates were cultivated on half - strength potato dextrose broth for 21 days at 28°C on a rotatory shaker at 180 rpm, and extracted in ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. The probable inhibitory effects of both extracts against an adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model were examined and compared with the effects of methotrexate (MTX) as a standard disease-modifying anti-rheumatoid drug. Disease activity and mobility scoring of AIA, histopathology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to evaluate probable inhibitory roles. A significant reduction ( < 0.05) in the severity of arthritis was observed in both the methanolic extract of CG6 (MCG6) and MTX treatment groups 6 days after treatment commenced. The average arthritis score of the MCG6 treatment group was (10.7 ± 0.82) compared to (13.8 ± 0.98) in the positive control group. The mobility score of the MCG6 treatment group (1.50 ± 0.55) was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (3.33 ± 0.82). In contrast, the ethyl acetate extract of CG6 (EACG6) treatment group showed no improvements in arthritis and mobility scores in AIA model rats. Histopathology and TEM findings confirmed the observation. Isolate CG6 was subjected to sequencing for confirmation of phenotypic identification. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1-5.8 s - ITS2 rDNA sequences obtained were compared with those deposited in the GenBank Database and registered with accession number KC811080 in the NCBI Database. The present study revealed that the methanol extract of endophytic fungus (KC811080) recovered from maidenhair fern has an inhibitory effect on inflammation, histopathology and morphological features of rheumatoid arthritis in an AIA rat model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01477DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5029229PMC
September 2016

Pretreatment hepatoprotective effect of the marine fungus derived from sponge on hepatic toxicity induced by heavy metals in rats.

Biomed Res Int 2013 13;2013:510879. Epub 2013 Jan 13.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the pretreatment hepatoprotective effect of the extract of marine-derived fungus Trichurus spiralis Hasselbr (TS) isolated from Hippospongia communis sponge on hepatotoxicity. Twenty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n = 7). Group I served as -ve control, group II served as the induced group receiving subcutaneously for seven days 0.25 mg heavy metal mixtures, group III received (i.p.) TS extract of dose 40 mg for seven days, and group IV served as the protected group pretreated with TS extract for seven days as a protection dose, and then treated with the heavy metal-mixture. The main pathological changes within the liver after heavy-metal mixtures administrations marked hepatic damage evidenced by foci of lobular necrosis with neutrophilic infiltration, adjacent to dysplastic hepatocytes. ALT and AST measurements show a significant increase in group II by 46.20% and 45.12%, respectively. Total protein, elevated by about 38.9% in induction group compared to the -ve control group, in contrast to albumin, decreased as a consequence of metal administration with significant elevation on bilirubin level. The results prove that TS extract possesses a hepatoprotective property due to its proven antioxidant and free-radical scavenging properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/510879DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3581279PMC
September 2013

The history, fungal biodiversity, conservation, and future perspectives for mycology in Egypt.

IMA Fungus 2010 Dec 10;1(2):123-42. Epub 2010 Nov 10.

Botany Department, Faculty of Science, University of Suez Canal, Ismailia 41522, Egypt;

Records of Egyptian fungi, including lichenized fungi, are scattered through a wide array of journals, books, and dissertations, but preliminary annotated checklists and compilations are not all readily available. This review documents the known available sources and compiles data for more than 197 years of Egyptian mycology. Species richness is analysed numerically with respect to the systematic position and ecology. Values of relative species richness of different systematic and ecological groups in Egypt compared to values of the same groups worldwide, show that our knowledge of Egyptian fungi is fragmentary, especially for certain systematic and ecological groups such as Agaricales, Glomeromycota, and lichenized, nematode-trapping, entomopathogenic, marine, aquatic and coprophilous fungi, and also yeasts. Certain groups have never been studied in Egypt, such as Trichomycetes and black yeasts. By screening available sources of information, it was possible to delineate 2281 taxa belonging to 755 genera of fungi, including 57 myxomycete species as known from Egypt. Only 105 taxa new to science have been described from Egypt, one belonging to Chytridiomycota, 47 to Ascomycota, 55 to anamorphic fungi and one to Basidiomycota.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348774PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.5598/imafungus.2010.01.02.04DOI Listing
December 2010

Thielavia gigaspora, a new thermotolerant ascomycete from Egypt.

Microbiol Res 2008 7;163(4):441-4. Epub 2006 Sep 7.

Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

Thielavia gigaspora sp. nov. from herbivore dung is described and illustrated. The new taxon by comparison with previously known species is distinguished by relatively large ascospores (25-38 x 15-21 microm), each showing an apical, protuberant germ pore and a longitudinal dark band. A brief comparison with morphologically related species is given.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micres.2006.07.008DOI Listing
September 2008