Publications by authors named "Ahmed Hussein Amin"

3 Publications

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Perioperative nonhormonal pharmacological interventions for bleeding reduction during open and minimally invasive myomectomy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Fertil Steril 2020 01 18;113(1):224-233.e6. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Objective: To synthesize evidence on the most effective pharmacological interventions for bleeding reduction during open and minimally invasive myomectomy.

Design: Systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).

Setting: Not applicable.

Patients: Trials assessing efficacy of pharmacological interventions during different types of myomectomy.

Interventions: Misoprostol, oxytocin, vasopressin, tranexamic acid (TXA), epinephrine, or ascorbic acid.

Main Outcome Measures: Intraoperative blood loss and need for blood transfusion.

Results: The present review included 26 randomized control trials (RCTs) (N = 1627). For minimally invasive procedures (9 RCTs; 474 patients), network meta-analysis showed that oxytocin (mean difference [MD] -175.5 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -30.1.07, -49.93), ornipressin (MD -149.6 mL, 95% CI - 178.22, -120.98), misoprostol, bupivacaine plus epinephrine, and vasopressin were effective in reducing myomectomy blood loss, but the evidence is of low quality. Ranking score of treatments included in subgroup analysis of minimally invasive myomectomy showed that oxytocin ranked first in reducing blood loss, followed by ornipressin. For open myomectomy (17 RCTs; 1,153 patients), network meta-analysis showed that vasopressin plus misoprostol (MD -652.97 mL, 95% CI - 1113.69, -174.26), oxytocin, TXA, and misoprostol were effective; however, the evidence is of low quality. Vasopressin plus misoprostol ranked first in reducing blood loss during open myomectomy (P = .97).

Conclusion: There is low-quality evidence to support uterotonics, especially oxytocin, and peripheral vasoconstrictors as effective options in reducing blood loss and need for blood transfusion during minimally invasive myomectomy. Oxytocin is the most effective intervention in minimally invasive myomectomy. For open myomectomy, a combination of uterotonics and peripheral vasoconstrictors is needed to effectively reduce blood loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.09.016DOI Listing
January 2020

The effect of early vs. delayed postpartum insertion of the LNG-IUS on breastfeeding continuation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care 2019 Oct 13;24(5):327-336. Epub 2019 Sep 13.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University , Cairo , Egypt.

The aim of the study was to compare early vs. delayed postpartum insertion of the 52 mg levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). The databases of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and CENTRAL were searched to February 2019. The search comprised randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing early vs. delayed postpartum insertion of the LNG-IUS. Data were extracted and combined in a meta-analysis. Pooled results were expressed as the relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). The main outcome measures were breastfeeding continuation, LNG-IUS expulsion, uterine perforation, LNG-IUS use, satisfaction and number of pregnancies. Twelve RCTs were included, comprising 1006 women in total. Our analysis indicated no significant difference between early and delayed insertion of the LNG-IUS in terms of any breastfeeding continuation (RR 0.99; 95% CI 0.84, 1.16;  = 0.88). After removal of heterogeneity, there was a statistically significant superiority in LNG-IUS use at the endpoint in the early insertion group compared with the delayed insertion group (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.07, 1.51;  = 0.006). LNG-IUS expulsion was significantly less in the delayed insertion group in comparison with the early insertion group (RR 5.32; 95% CI 2.68, 10.53;  = 0.00001). No significant differences were found between the groups in satisfaction, number of pregnancies and risk of uterine perforation. Early postpartum insertion of the LNG-IUS has no negative effects on breastfeeding continuation. Early postpartum insertion may be used as an alternative to delayed postpartum insertion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13625187.2019.1665175DOI Listing
October 2019

The Effect of Zumba Exercise on Reducing Menstrual Pain in Young Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2019 Oct 11;32(5):541-545. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt.

Study Objective: To study the effectiveness of performing Zumba exercise on the severity and duration of pain in patients with primary dysmenorrhea.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Cairo University gynecology Hospital and Bahgat gym and fitness center.

Participants: Ninety-eight women diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea.

Interventions: Study participants were divided randomly into 2 equal groups: group I included women who engaged in Zumba exercise for 60 minutes twice weekly for 8 weeks, and group II was a control group with no intervention.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was the menstrual pain intensity measured using the visual analogue scale scores at 4 and 8 weeks after starting Zumba exercise. The secondary outcome was the difference in the duration of pain in both groups.

Results: Both groups were homogeneous regarding the baseline demographic characteristics. The severity of primary dysmenorrhea at the beginning of the study was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Menstrual pain intensity was significantly decreased in the Zumba group after 4 and 8 weeks of Zumba compared with the control group (mean difference, -2.94 [95% confidence interval, -3.39 to -2.48] and -3.79 [95% confidence interval, -4.16 to -3.43], respectively; P = .001). Also, the duration of pain was shorter in the Zumba group compared with the control group at 8 weeks (4.92 ± 1.90 vs 9.10 ± 2.92 hours, respectively; P = .001).

Conclusion: The Zumba intervention can reduce the severity and duration of menstrual pain thus suggesting that regularly performing Zumba might be a possible complementary treatment for primary dysmenorrhea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2019.06.001DOI Listing
October 2019