Publications by authors named "Ahmed F Sherief"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Egypt's second wave of coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic and its impact on patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

JGH Open 2021 Jun 6;5(6):664-668. Epub 2021 May 6.

Tropical Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University Cairo Egypt.

Background And Aim: After a decrease of COVID-19 cases in summer, Europe faced the appearance of a COVID-19 second wave. IBD patients are more vulnerable to various emotional and psychological stresses than normal individuals. The aim of this study explored the emotional state, perception, and coping strategies of patients with IBD during the COVID 19 pandemic period.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between 15 November and 15 December 2020. Patients presented to IBD Study Group Clinic, Department of Tropical Medicine, Ain Shams University Hospitals. The study included 105 IBD patients. A predesigned questionnaire was used that focused on patients' knowledge of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how it influenced patient care. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, and medication type were analyzed.

Results: We found 10.5% of patients stopped or delayed their medications owing to the COVID-19 pandemic second wave and 61% reported that their clinic visits were affected. Seven patients were tested, and two patients reported having been diagnosed with COVID-19, and 18 patients reported having relatives diagnosed with COVID-19.

Conclusion: A considerable number of patients with IBD had an interruption to their care because of the second wave COVID-19 pandemic. So, patients with IBD should take attention before, during, and after such pandemics to avoid undesirable disease-related outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jgh3.12551DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8171149PMC
June 2021

Safety and efficacy of favipiravir versus hydroxychloroquine in management of COVID-19: A randomised controlled trial.

Sci Rep 2021 03 31;11(1):7282. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Chest Department, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.

Favipiravir is considered a potential treatment for COVID-19 due its efficacy against different viral infections. We aimed to explore the safety and efficacy of favipiravir in treatment of COVID-19 mild and moderate cases. It was randomized-controlled open-label interventional phase 3 clinical trial [NCT04349241]. 100 patients were recruited from 18th April till 18th May. 50 patients received favipiravir 3200 mg at day 1 followed by 600 mg twice (day 2-day 10). 50 patients received hydroxychloroquine 800 mg at day 1 followed by 200 mg twice (day 2-10) and oral oseltamivir 75 mg/12 h/day for 10 days. Patients were enrolled from Ain Shams University Hospital and Assiut University Hospital. Both arms were comparable as regards demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The average onset of SARS-CoV-2 PCR negativity was 8.1 and 8.3 days in HCQ-arm and favipiravir-arm respectively. 55.1% of those on HCQ-arm turned PCR negative at/or before 7th day from diagnosis compared to 48% in favipiravir-arm (p = 0.7). 4 patients in FVP arm developed transient transaminitis on the other hand heartburn and nausea were reported in about 20 patients in HCQ-arm. Only one patient in HCQ-arm died after developing acute myocarditis resulted in acute heart failure. Favipiravir is a safe effective alternative for hydroxychloroquine in mild or moderate COVID-19 infected patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-85227-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8012649PMC
March 2021

Efficacy of favipiravir in COVID-19 treatment: a multi-center randomized study.

Arch Virol 2021 Mar 25;166(3):949-954. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.

No specific antiviral drugs have been approved for the treatment of COVID-19. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of favipiravir in treatment of COVID-19. This was a multicenter randomized controlled study including 96 patients with COVID- 19 who were randomly assigned into a chloroquine (CQ) group and a favipiravir group. None of the patients in the favipiravir group needed mechanical ventilation (p = 0.129). One patient (2.3%) in the favipiravir group and two patients (4.2%) in the CQ group died (p = 1.00). Favipiravir is a promising drug for COVID-19 that decreases the hospital stay and the need for mechanical ventilation.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT04351295.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-021-04956-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7829645PMC
March 2021

Liver transplantation in the era of COVID-19.

Arab J Gastroenterol 2020 Jun 12;21(2):69-75. Epub 2020 May 12.

Internal Medicine Department, Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Kasr Al-Ainy School Of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Liver transplantation is considered the ultimate solution for patients with end-stage chronic liver disease or acute liver failure. Patients with liver transplant need special care starting from preoperative preparation, surgical intervention ending with postoperative care. Transplanted patients have to receive immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection. Such a state of immune suppression could predispose to different types of infections in liver transplant recipients. Currently, the world is suffering a pandemic caused by a new strain of the coronavirus family called COVID-19. Certain infection control precautions are needed to protect immunocompromised and vulnerable patients, including liver transplant candidates and recipients from acquiring COVID-19 infection. Restricting non-transplant elective surgical procedures, managing transplant patients in separate outpatient clinics, and in-patient wards can prevent transmission of infection both to patients and healthcare workers. Telemedicine can help in the triage of patients to screen for symptoms of COVID-19 before their regular appointment. Management of immunosuppressive therapy and drug-drug interactions in liver transplant recipients infected with COVID-19 should be cautiously practiced to prevent rejection and effectively treat the underlying infection. In this report, we are trying to summarize available evidence about different aspects of the management of liver transplant candidates and recipients in the era of COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajg.2020.04.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7214343PMC
June 2020

A significant upsurge of body mass index in patients with chronic hepatitis C successfully treated with direct-acting antiviral regimens.

Turk J Gastroenterol 2019 08;30(8):708-713

Endemic Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Department, Cairo University School of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt.

Background/aims: There is less data regarding the changes in body mass index (BMI) after treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients with new direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). This study aimed to assess the changes in BMI in chronic HCV patients treated with DAAs in Egypt and to explore other factors influencing this change.

Materials And Methods: The data of chronic HCV patients who received antiviral therapy with new DAAs in one of Egypt's specialized viral hepatitis treatment centers were retrospectively analyzed. In addition to the routine clinical and laboratory workup, changes in body weight during and after treatment were monitored and BMI was calculated. Viral load was measured at 12 weeks post-treatment to assess a sustained virological response. Patients with documented thyroid abnormalities, bariatric surgery, or ensuing special diets were excluded. BMI of >30 was taken as the cutoff for pa¬tients with obesity.

Results: The study included 162 patients with a mean age of 48.56±11.49 years, of whom 61.1% were males, 16% were treatment-experienced, 12% were diabetic, and 29% were obese. Treatment duration was 12 weeks in 84% of patients and 24 weeks in 16% of patients. There was a significant increase in BMI post-treatment as compared to pretreatment measures (28.68±5.35 vs 28.18±4.55) (p=0.03). BMI changes were constant regardless of cirrhosis or previous treatment experience.

Conclusion: Treatment of chronic HCV with DAAs was associated with increased body mass index. Further studies are needed to explore if this effect is secondary to treatment with DAAs or is an improvement in the liver function and lifestyle of treated patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tjg.2019.18514DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6699564PMC
August 2019

Egyptian liver library: An indexed database for liver disease evidence in Egypt.

Arab J Gastroenterol 2019 Jun 4;20(2):109-113. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Endemic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt.

Liver diseases are among the most challenging health care problems worldwide. In Egypt, we established different care programs to combat liver diseases including schistosomiasis and viral hepatitides. A lot of research work addressing liver diseases in Egypt have been published with special focus on these two major fields. Other liver disease seems to be neglected although present and contributing to the liver disease burden in Egypt. In this report we reviewed the available evidence published from Egypt and elucidate areas of weakness and future research needs. Our search for Egyptian liver disease evidence retrieved 4683 articles, 67% of them were relevant to the topic. Out of the relevant articles; 1646/3265 (50.4%) were discussing clinical science, 1131 (34.7%) were discussing basic science and 488 (14.9%) were discussing both basic and clinical sciences. Cairo university (16.8%, n = 513) and Mansoura university (9.3%, n = 285) had the largest number of publications related to liver disease in Egypt respectively. The most commonly reported diseases were hepatitis C in 719/3361 articles (21.4%), parasitic liver infestations in 663 articles (19.7%), hepatocellular carcinoma in 544 articles (16.2%), liver fibrosis or cirrhosis in 537 articles (16%), and drug induced liver injury in 516 articles (15.4%). Most of the reviewed articles (36%) were discussing treatment of chronic liver diseases (n = 1201) followed by diagnostics (28%, n = 940), pathogenesis and pathophysiology (21%, n = 706). This review will direct attention to areas with less research like hepatitis B related liver disease, HIV/HCV co-infections, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to encourage future research in these topics. In conclusion; our results ring a bell inviting the development of a roadmap for liver research in Egypt targeting to put future policies to cover areas of weakness in liver research with an ultimate goal of tackling liver disease and its overwhelming socioeconomic burden in our developing country.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajg.2019.05.004DOI Listing
June 2019
-->