Publications by authors named "Ahmed Aboumohamed"

30 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinical Risk Factors Associated With Small Renal Mass Malignant Histology in a Multi-Ethnic Population Undergoing Partial Nephrectomy.

Clin Genitourin Cancer 2022 Jun 8. Epub 2022 Jun 8.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ; Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Newark, NJ. Electronic address:

Introduction: Small renal masses (SRMs) are often incidentally diagnosed, and a large proportion are malignant. However, there is a paucity of data describing predictors of malignancy in minority patients with SRMs. Thus, our goal was to examine clinical risk factors associated with SRM malignant histology in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy (PN) a diverse, urban academic center.

Materials And Methods: Patients with a SRM undergoing PN at a single institution between 2010 to 2018 were reviewed. Demographic, clinical, and imaging characteristics were compared to pathology results. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between demographic/clinical variables for malignant and high-grade histology.

Results: In total, 331 patients who underwent PN for SRM were included. Of those, 264 (79.8%) had malignant histology while 67 (20.2%) had benign histology. The proportions of men and of current smokers were significantly higher among patients with malignant histology. In multivariate models, non-Hispanic Black (NHB) patients had increased odds of having malignant histology (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.01-5.99, P = .048) and current smokers (OR = 4.02; 95% CI 1.14-14.18, P = .031). Hispanic patients had a 3-fold increased risk of high-grade RCC (OR 3.06, 95% CI: 1.19-7.87, P = 0.02) compared to Non-Hispanic White patients.

Conclusion: In our population, male sex, smoking, and NHB race/ethnicity was associated with an increased risk of malignancy in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for SRM. Older age and Hispanic race/ethnicity were associated with high grade RCC. Our results suggest that urologists should exercise a higher level of vigilance in managing and treating SRM among NHB and Hispanic patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2022.06.004DOI Listing
June 2022

Case - Testicular thigh pouches for severe Fournier's gangrene: A how-to guide.

Can Urol Assoc J 2022 May 20. Epub 2022 May 20.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States.

Fournier's gangrene is a surgical emergency that requires prompt debridement of infected tissue. When the majority of scrotum has been resected, placing the testicles into thigh pouches can allow for improved wound granulation/contracture prior to definitive tissue reconstruction. We present a surgical guide on how to create testicular thigh pouches without the use of thigh counter-incisions, and its utility in delayed wound healing for large scrotal wounds. This technique may serve as a valuable adjunct in the urologist's and plastic surgeon's armamentarium to optimize testicular coverage and subsequent genital reconstruction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.7901DOI Listing
May 2022

Relapses Rates and Patterns for Pathological T0 After Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy: Results From the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

Urology 2022 Aug 21;166:177-181. Epub 2022 Apr 21.

Department of Urology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY. Electronic address:

Objectives: To investigate the oncologic outcomes of pT0 after robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC).

Methods: A retrospective review of the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium database was performed. Patients with pT0 after RARC were identified and analyzed. Data were reviewed for demographics and pathologic outcomes. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to depict recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Multivariate stepwise Cox regression models were used to identify variables associated with RFS and OS.

Results: Four hundred seventy-one patients (18%) with pT0 were identified. Median age was 68 years (interquartile range (IQR) 60-73), with a median follow up of 20 months (IQR 6-47). Thirty-seven percent received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 5% had pN+ disease. Seven percent of patients experienced disease relapse; 3% had local and 5% had distant recurrence. Most common sites of local and distant recurrences were pelvis (1%) and lungs (2%). Five-year RFS, DSS, and OS were 88%, 93%, and 79%, respectively. Age (hazards ratio [HR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.09, P = 0.02), pN+ve (HR 11.48, 95% CI 4.47-29.49, P < .01), and reoperations within 30 days (HR 5.53, 95% CI 2.08-14.64, P < .01) were associated with RFS. Chronic kidney disease (HR 3.24, 95% CI 1.45-7.23, P < .01), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.18-0.92, P = .03), pN+ve (HR 4.37, 95% CI 1.46-13.06, P < .01), and reoperations within 30 days (HR 2.64, 95% CI, 1.08-6.43, P = .03) were associated with OS.

Conclusions: Despite pT0 status at RARC, 5% had pN+ disease and 7% of patients relapsed. Node status was the variable strongest associated with RFS and OS in pT0.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2022.03.035DOI Listing
August 2022

Diagnosis and Treatment of a Mixed Epithelial Stromal Tumor of the Seminal Vesicle: A Systematic Review.

Urology 2022 Feb 26. Epub 2022 Feb 26.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Electronic address:

Objective: To perform a systematic review of mixed epithelial stromal tumor of the seminal vesicle (SV) to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of this rare condition.

Methods: "Seminal vesicle mixed epithelial stromal tumor" OR "seminal vesicle cystadenoma" were searched on PubMed/MEDLINE for relevant articles through 6 September 2021. Articles were eligible if they were in English, accessible via our university library services, and if the abstract was concordant with the content of the publication. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to identify additional relevant articles.

Results: In total, 66 articles were identified, of which 34 (N = 36 patients) were included. The most common presenting symptoms were lower urinary tract symptoms (33%, 12/36), dysuria (22%, 8/36), lower abdominal pain (17%, 6/36), and hematuria (17%, 6/36). However, there were eight cases (23%, 8/36) of asymptomatic incidental SV tumors. A biopsy was performed in 47% of cases (17/36), of which 53% (9/17) showed benign findings, 29% (5/17) were inconclusive, and 18% (3/17) SV cystadenoma. Surgical resection was performed using open (57%, 20/35), laparoscopic (26%, 9/35), or robotic (17%, 6/35) techniques. The majority (94%, 34/36) of the SV tumors were low-grade. Long-term follow-up was reported for 15 patients in which two patients (13%, 2/15) had tumor recurrence.

Conclusion: High rate of inconclusive biopsy of SV tumors suggests that routine biopsy is of questionable utility. Surgical excision frequently relieves symptoms and confirms accurate pathologic diagnosis. After tumor removal, patients should be surveilled with cross-sectional imaging of the pelvis given the possibility of tumor recurrence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2022.02.012DOI Listing
February 2022

Impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on survival and recurrence patterns after robot-assisted radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: Results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

Int J Urol 2022 Mar 19;29(3):197-205. Epub 2021 Dec 19.

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Objectives: To analyze the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on survival and recurrence patterns in muscle-invasive bladder cancer after robot-assisted radical cystectomy.

Materials And Methods: The International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium database was reviewed to identify patients who underwent robot-assisted radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 2002 and 2019. Survival outcomes, response rates, and recurrence patterns were compared between patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and those who did not. Survival distributions were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared using the log-rank test.

Results: A total of 1370 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were identified, of whom 353 (26%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 27 months, neoadjuvant chemotherapy recipients had higher 3-year overall survival (74% vs 57%; log-rank P < 0.01), 3-year cancer-specific survival (83% vs 73%; log-rank P = 0.03), and 3-year relapse-free survival (64% vs 48%; log-rank P < 0.01). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was a predictor of higher overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and relapse-free survival in univariate but not multivariate analysis. Pathological downstaging (46% vs 23%; P < 0.01), complete responses (24% vs 8%; P < 0.01), and margin negativity (95% vs 91%; P < 0.01) at robot-assisted radical cystectomy were more common in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy recipients had lower distant (15% vs 22%; P < 0.01) but similar locoregional (12% vs 13%; P = 0.93) recurrence rates.

Conclusions: In this analysis from a large international database, patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before robot-assisted radical cystectomy had higher rates of survival, pathological downstaging, and margin-negative resections. They also experienced fewer distant recurrences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iju.14749DOI Listing
March 2022

The impact of surgical downgrading on prostate cancer recurrence: systematic review and analysis of a multiethnic population.

World J Urol 2022 Mar 30;40(3):709-718. Epub 2021 Nov 30.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Objective: To perform a systematic review and a retrospective cohort analysis evaluating the rates of surgical downgrading of prostate cancer (PCa) from biopsy (PBx) to radical prostatectomy (RP), and their association with biochemical recurrence (BCR) in a multiethnic population.

Methods: A systematic review of PubMed and other databases was performed. We included retrospective studies evaluating the relationship between surgical downgrading and BCR-free survival. Data regarding Gleason score (GL) downgrading were abstracted from the articles and categorized as follows: GL8-10 to GL7, GL7 to GL6, and GL 7(4 + 3) to GL7(3 + 4). We also performed a retrospective cohort review of patients who underwent RP at our institution from 2005 through 2020. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare BCR among downgraded versus non-downgraded men.

Results: Systematic review yielded 137 abstracts; of these, 36 full-texts were reviewed, 8 of which were included in our systematic review. Despite substantial variability, all showed that GL at RP is one of the most important factors of BCR-free survival. A total of 1,484 men with PCa were analyzed from our institution. On multivariate analysis, GL7 to GL6 downgrading (HR = 0.50, p = 0.022) and GL8-10 to GL7 downgrading (HR = 0.42, p = 0.011) were associated with reduced risk of BCR when compared to men with GL7 and GL8-10 concordance, respectively. However, GL7(4 + 3) to GL7(3 + 4) downgrading was not significantly associated with reduced BCR (HR = 0.56, p = 0.12), when compared to GL7(4 + 3) concordance, although HR was similar.

Conclusion: Surgical downgrading at RP was associated with a reduced risk of BCR compared to GL concordant disease, and these findings have been validated within our multiethnic population. Pathologic downgrading at the time of RP may be a more useful predictor of subsequent BCR in comparison to that associated with GL concordant pathology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00345-021-03892-2DOI Listing
March 2022

Development and Validation of an Objective Scoring Tool for Robot-Assisted Partial Nephrectomy: Scoring for Partial Nephrectomy.

J Endourol 2022 05 23;36(5):647-653. Epub 2021 Dec 23.

Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

To develop a structured and objective scoring tool for assessment of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN): Scoring for Partial Nephrectomy (SPaN). : RAPN was deconstructed into 6 domains by a multi-institutional panel of 10 expert robotic surgeons. Performance on each domain was represented on a Likert scale of 1 to 5, with specific descriptions of anchors 1, 3, and 5. : The Delphi methodology was utilized to achieve consensus about the description of each anchor for each domain in terms of appropriateness of the skill assessed, objectiveness, clarity, and unambiguous wording. The content validity index (CVI) of ≥0.75 was set as cutoff for consensus. : 15 de-identified videos of RAPN were utilized to determine the inter-rater reliability using linearly weighted percent agreement, and of SPaN was described in terms of median scores and odds ratios. The expert panel reached consensus (CVI ≥0.75) after 2 rounds. Consensus was achieved for 36 (67%) statements in the first round and 18 (33%) after the second round. The final six-domain SPaN included Exposure of the kidney; Identification and dissection of the ureter and gonadal vessels; Dissection of the hilum; Tumor localization and exposure; Clamping and tumor resection; and Renorrhaphy. The linearly weighted percent agreement was >0.75 for all domains. There was no difference between median scores for any domain between attendings and trainees. Despite the lack of significant construct validity, SPaN is a structured, reliable, and procedure-specific tool that can objectively assesses technical proficiency for RAPN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2021.0706DOI Listing
May 2022

Intracorporeal Versus Extracorporeal Neobladder After Robot-assisted Radical Cystectomy: Results From the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

Urology 2022 01 25;159:127-132. Epub 2021 Oct 25.

Department of Urology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY. Electronic address:

Objective: To compare perioperative and oncologic outcomes of intracorporeal (ICNB) and extracorporeal neobladder (ECNB) following robot assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) from a multi-institutional, prospectively maintained database, the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC).

Methods: A retrospective review of IRCC database between 2003 and 2020 (3742 patients from 33 institutions across 14 countries) was performed (I-79606). The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to assess utilization of ICNB over time. Multivariate logistic regression models were fit to evaluate variables associated with receiving ICNB, overall complications, high-grade complications, and readmissions after RARC. Kaplan Meier curves were used to depict recurrence-free, disease-specific, and overall survival.

Results: Four hundred eleven patients received neobladder, 64% underwent ICNB. ICNB utilization increased significantly over time (P <.01). Patients who received ICNB were readmitted and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy more frequently (36% vs 24%, P = .03, 35% vs 8%, P <.01, respectively). ICNB was associated with older age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07, P = .001), receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (OR 4.63, 95% CI 2.34-9.18, P <.01), and more recent RARC era (2016-2020) (OR 12.6, 95% CI 5.6-28.4, P <.01). On multivariate analysis, ICNB (OR 5.43, 95% CI 2.34-12.58, P <.01), positive surgical margin (OR 4.88, 95% CI 1.29-18.42, P = .019), longer operative times (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.00-1.58, P = .048), and institutional annual RARC volume (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.05-1.12, P <.01) were associated with readmissions.

Conclusion: Utilization of ICNB increased significantly over time. Patients who underwent RARC and ICNB had shorter hospital stays and fewer 30-d reoperations but were readmitted more frequently compared to those who underwent ECNB.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2021.10.012DOI Listing
January 2022

Ureteral metastasis in colorectal cancer: A case report and review of literature.

Urol Case Rep 2021 Nov 13;39:101851. Epub 2021 Sep 13.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 11061, USA.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common clinical entity. A significant proportion of patients experience metastatic disease, typically in the form of lung and liver spread. We present the case of a CRC cancer patient with distant metastasis to the ureter, causing hydronephrosis. Ureteroscopy and biopsy confirmed the diagnosis and the patient was subsequently treated with percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement. Distant spread of CRC to the ureter represents an exceedingly rare phenomenon. This case highlights the importance of heightened index of suspicion for ureteral involvement in CRC when hydronephrosis is identified on staging or surveillance cross sectional imaging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eucr.2021.101851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8449067PMC
November 2021

Functional succinate dehydrogenase deficiency is a common adverse feature of clear cell renal cancer.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2021 09;118(39)

Department of Medicine (Oncology), Albert Einstein College of Medicine-Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10461;

Reduced succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity resulting in adverse succinate accumulation was previously considered relevant only in 0.05 to 0.5% of kidney cancers associated with germline SDH mutations. Here, we sought to examine a broader role for SDH loss in kidney cancer pathogenesis/progression. We report that underexpression of SDH subunits resulting in accumulation of oncogenic succinate is a common feature in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) (∼80% of all kidney cancers), with a marked adverse impact on survival in ccRCC patients ( = 516). We show that SDH down-regulation is a critical brake in the TCA cycle during ccRCC pathogenesis and progression. In exploring mechanisms of SDH down-regulation in ccRCC, we report that Von Hippel-Lindau loss-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent up-regulation of miR-210 causes direct inhibition of the transcript. Moreover, shallow deletion of occurs in ∼20% of ccRCC. We then demonstrate that SDH loss-induced succinate accumulation contributes to adverse loss of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, gain of 5-methylcytosine, and enhanced invasiveness in ccRCC via inhibition of ten-eleven translocation (TET)-2 activity. Intriguingly, binding affinity between the catalytic domain of recombinant TET-2 and succinate was found to be very low, suggesting that the mechanism of succinate-induced attenuation of TET-2 activity is likely via product inhibition rather than competitive inhibition. Finally, exogenous ascorbic acid, a TET-activating demethylating agent, led to reversal of the above oncogenic effects of succinate in ccRCC cells. Collectively, our study demonstrates that functional SDH deficiency is a common adverse feature of ccRCC and not just limited to the kidney cancers associated with germline SDH mutations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2106947118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8488664PMC
September 2021

Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Treatment Is Inversely Associated With the Risk of Developing Alzheimer Disease or Other Dementia Among Patients With Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

Clin Genitourin Cancer 2021 12 17;19(6):e409-e416. Epub 2021 May 17.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx NY. Electronic address:

Background: The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), but it remains unclear whether bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) may affect the risk of AD or not.

Methods: Using retrospective chart review, we collected data regarding demographics, comorbidities, cancer diagnosis, BCG treatment, and subsequent diagnosis of AD or other dementia in a racially/ethnically diverse cohort of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NIMBC) receiving treatment between 1984 and 2020 in the Bronx, New York. We used Cox proportional hazard models to examine association between BCG treatment and risk of incident AD or other dementia, adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and major comorbidities.

Results: In our cohort of 1290 patients with NMIBC, a total of 99 (7.7%) patients developed AD or other dementia during follow-up. Patients who received BCG treatment (25%) had a 60% lowered incidence of AD or other dementia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.80) in comparison to those who did not receive BCG. There was also suggestive evidence that the reduction in risk of AD or other dementia associated with BCG treatment was stronger in men (adjusted HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.15-0.81) but not in women (adjusted HR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.25-2.24). When we stratified the patients who received BCG by type of treatments, patients who received both induction and maintenance rounds of BCG had a further lowered incidence of AD or other dementia (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.06-0.96) than patients who did not receive BCG.

Conclusions: To our knowledge, our study is one of the first to suggest that BCG treatment is associated with a reduced risk of developing AD or other dementia in a multiethnic population, independent of significant comorbidities. Larger cohort studies are needed to corroborate our findings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2021.05.001DOI Listing
December 2021

OUTCOMES OF INTRAVESICAL BACILLUS CALMETTE-GUERIN IN A MULTIRACIAL COHORT WITH NON-MUSCLE-INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER.

Urol Pract 2021 Jan 1;8(1):100-105. Epub 2021 Jan 1.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Bronx, NY.

Introduction: We sought to determine if outcomes of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) vary by race.

Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 149 patients treated with BCG for intermediate- and high-risk NMIBC between 2001 and 2018, and who were followed up for cancer recurrence through March 2019.The primary outcomes were disease-free survival (DFS), low-grade disease-free survival (LGDFS), high-grade disease-free survival (HGDFS), and progression-free survival (PFS) at five years. Kaplan-Meier survival curves stratified by race (African American vs non-African American) were analyzed for all the above outcomes and multivariate Cox regression analyses were also performed to compare recurrence differences by race, after adjusting for age, sex, initial stage and grade.

Results: Of the 149 patients, 37.6% were Caucasian, 24.8% were African American, 26.8% were Hispanic, and 10.7% were of other/unknown race. Disease stage at initial presentation was 65.1% Ta, 34.9% T1, and 18.1% CIS. African American patients (N=37) did not have evidence for worse outcomes compared to non-African American patients when considering DFS (54.1% vs. 65.7%, p = 0.202), HGDFS (58.8% vs. 71.7%, p = 0.158), and PFS (83.8% vs. 92.6%, p = 0.117) at five years. Multivariate analysis did not reveal statistically significant racial differences in recurrence or progression.

Conclusions: African Americans with NMIBC did not have worse disease recurrence and progression after receiving intravesical BCG treatment. Although there did appear to be a trend towards worse oncologic outcomes in African Americans, larger studies are needed to validate this finding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/upj.0000000000000154DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8130652PMC
January 2021

A Comparison of Image-Guided Targeted Prostate Biopsy Outcomes by PI-RADS® Score and Ethnicity in a Diverse, Multiethnic Population.

J Urol 2021 09 21;206(3):586-594. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

Purpose: NonHispanic Black (NHB) and Hispanic/Afro-Caribbean men have the highest risk of prostate cancer (PCa) compared to nonHispanic White (NHW) men. However, ethnicity-specific outcomes of targeted fusion biopsy (FB) for the detection of PCa are poorly characterized. We compared the outcomes of FB by Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS®) score and race/ethnicity among a diverse population.

Materials And Methods: We evaluated all men who underwent image-guided FB for suspicious lesions on prostate magnetic resonance imaging (≥PI-RADS 3) over a 2-year period. We examined associations of race/ethnicity and PI-RADS score with risk of PCa or clinically significant PCa (cs-PCa, Gleason Group ≥2) on FB using mixed-effects logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 410 men with 658 lesions were analyzed, with 201 (49.0%) identified as NHB and 125 (30.5%) identified as Hispanic. NHB men had a twofold increase in the odds of detecting cs-PCa (OR=2.7, p=0.045), while Hispanic men had similar odds of detecting cs-PCa compared to NHW men. With regard to all PCa, NHB men had a similar increase in the odds of detecting all PCa (OR=2.4, p=0.050), which was borderline statistically significant compared to NHW men on FB. When we excluded men on active surveillance, NHB men had even stronger associations with detection of cs-PCa (OR=3.10, p=0.047) or all PCa (OR=2.77, p=0.032) compared to NHW men.

Conclusions: NHB men have higher odds for overall PCa and cs-PCa on FB compared to NHW men. Further work may clarify differences per PI-RADS score. Clinicians should interpret prostate magnetic resonance imaging lesions with more caution in NHB men.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JU.0000000000001810DOI Listing
September 2021

Native kidney small renal masses in patients with kidney transplants: Does chronic immunosuppression affect tumor biology?

Can Urol Assoc J 2021 Oct;15(10):339-344

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, NY, United States.

Introduction: We compared clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of radical nephrectomy (RN) for small renal masses (SRM) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before or after transplant at a high-volume urologic and transplant center.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients with ESRD (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] <15 mL/min) who underwent RN for suspected malignant SRM from 2000-2018. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent RN after transplant; group 2 underwent RN prior to transplant, and group 3 underwent RN without subsequent transplant. Dominant tumor size and histopathological characteristics, recurrence, and survival outcomes were compared between groups. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare categorical and continuous baseline and histopathologic characteristics, respectively. Univariate analysis and log rank test were used to compare RCC recurrence rates.

Results: We identified 34 nephrectomies in group 1, 27 nephrectomies in group 2, and 70 nephrectomies in group 3. Median time from transplant to SRM radiological diagnosis in group 1 was 87 months, and three months from diagnosis to nephrectomy for all groups. There were no statistically significant differences between pathological dominant mass size, histological subtype breakdown, grade, or stage between the groups. Rates of benign histology were similar between the groups. Univariate analysis did not reveal a statistically significant difference in recurrence-free survival between the groups (p=0.9).

Conclusions: Patients undergoing nephrectomy before or after transplant for SRM have similar indolent clinicopathological characteristics and low recurrence rates. Our results suggest that chronic immunosuppression does not adversely affect SRM biology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.6996DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8525532PMC
October 2021

Methodology for triage of urologic surgical cases in the setting of a pandemic.

BMC Surg 2021 Mar 6;21(1):116. Epub 2021 Mar 6.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.

Background: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 forced our healthcare system in the Bronx, New York to cancel nearly all scheduled surgeries. We developed a framework for prioritizing postponed urologic surgeries that was utilized once cases were permitted to be rescheduled. As many parts of our country experience first and second waves of this pandemic, our framework may serve as a resource for other centers experiencing restrictions on the scheduling of elective urologic surgeries.

Methods: As the COVID-19 pandemic started and peaked in New York, almost all of our scheduled urologic surgeries were cancelled. Each Urologist was asked to rank his/her cancelled surgeries by priority (Level 1-least urgent; Level 2-moderately urgent; Level 3-most urgent). A committee of Urologists assigned a subclass to Level 3 and 2 cases (3a-least urgent; 3b-moderately urgent; 3c-most urgent; 2a-lower priority; 2b-higher priority). The committee then reviewed cases by urgency to derive a final priority ranking.

Results: A total of 478 total urologic surgeries were canceled and categorized: 250 Level 1, 130 Level 2, 98 Level 3 (73 adult, 25 pediatric). Level 3c involved renal cell carcinoma ≥ T2b, high-grade bladder urothelial carcinoma, adrenal mass/cancer > 6 cm, testicular cancer requiring radical orchiectomy, and penile cancer. Level 3b involved T2a renal masses requiring nephrectomy, while high-risk prostate cancer and symptomatic nephrolithiasis were classified as 3a. Level 2 included testicular cancer requiring retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and complicated benign prostatic hyperplasia. Surgeries for urologic reconstruction, non-complicated nephrolithiasis, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence were considered Level 1.

Conclusions: Our disease-specific approach to surgical rescheduling offers appropriate guidance for triaging urologic surgeries. Our system can provide guidance to other institutions as COVID-19 cases surge in different regions and with the growing second wave.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12893-021-01067-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7936241PMC
March 2021

Finasteride Use and Risk of Bladder Cancer in a Multiethnic Population.

J Urol 2021 07 22;206(1):15-21. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Urology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

Purpose: Finasteride use has been associated with a reduced incidence of bladder cancer. However, the majority of studies have been conducted primarily in East Asian or White populations. Given differences in the incidence of bladder cancer among racial/ethnic groups, it is important to determine whether the effect of finasteride use on bladder cancer varies by race/ethnicity.

Materials And Methods: We identified all patients with a diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia between 2000 and 2016 at our academic health center in Bronx, New York via an electronic medical record database. We then identified patients who were prescribed finasteride, and those who developed bladder cancer during followup. We used competing risk analysis to examine associations of finasteride use with risk of bladder cancer, adjusting for age, smoking and race/ethnicity.

Results: We identified 42,406 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (average±SD age 67±12.9 years), of whom 27.7% were Black and 14.8% were Hispanic. Finasteride was prescribed in 5,698 patients (13.4%). Bladder cancer was diagnosed in 84 of 5,698 finasteride users (1.5%), compared to 762 of 36,708 nonusers (2.1%, log-rank p=0.003). Finasteride was associated with a 36% reduction in risk of bladder cancer (HR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.51-0.80; p <0.0001) among all patients. When data were stratified by race/ethnicity, finasteride use was associated with a reduction in risk of bladder cancer in White men (HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.43-0.86; p=0.005) and Hispanic men (HR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.90; p=0.026), but there was no association among Black men (HR: 1.01, 95% CI: 0.67-1.51; p=0.964).

Conclusions: Our study corroborates previous findings that men who are on finasteride have a lower bladder cancer incidence. However, the reduction in risk was seen only in White and Hispanic men, but not among Black men. Therefore, race/ethnicity represents an important stratification factor for future larger studies on finasteride as chemoprevention for bladder cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JU.0000000000001694DOI Listing
July 2021

Systematic review and meta-analysis comparing cognitive vs. image-guided fusion prostate biopsy for the detection of prostate cancer.

Urol Oncol 2020 09 19;38(9):734.e19-734.e25. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Urology, Bronx, NY.

Objective: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing overall prostate cancer detection rate and clinically-significant prostate cancer detection rate between MRI-ultrasound image guided fusion biopsy (MRI-US FB) and cognitive biopsy (CB).

Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane library databases was performed. Identified studies were assessed for clinical relevance and excluded based on a set of predefined criteria. Final articles included in the analysis comprised only prospective trials that compared CB vs. MRI-US FB in men with MRI-identifiable lesions (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score 2+). Articles were reviewed for patient demographics, MRI protocol, and rates of overall and clinically significant prostate cancer detection by both modalities.

Results: Nine studies were analyzed. A composite 1,714 men with mean age 64.6 years and mean PSA 8.2 ng/dL were reviewed. When comparing FB to CB, the odds ratio for overall and for clinically significant prostate cancer detection was 1.11 (95%CI 0.91-1.36, P = 0.30) and 1.13 (95%CI 0.89-1.44, P = 0.32), respectively. Heterogeneity among the studies was moderate but not significant for either overall (X = 14.67; I = 45%; P = 0.07) or clinically significant prostate cancer detection (X = 11.81; I = 49%; P = 0.07).

Conclusion: MRI-US FB demonstrates a trend toward improved rates of prostate cancer detection compared to CB, although this is not statistically significant. Further comparative studies may help to further elucidate whether one of these modalities is superior over the other.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.03.020DOI Listing
September 2020

A comparative propensity score-matched analysis of perioperative outcomes of intracorporeal vs extracorporeal urinary diversion after robot-assisted radical cystectomy: results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

BJU Int 2020 08 16;126(2):265-272. Epub 2020 May 16.

Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA.

Objective: To compare the perioperative outcomes of intracorporeal (ICUD) vs extracorporeal urinary diversion (ECUD) after robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC).

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively maintained International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC) database. A total of 972 patients from 28 institutions who underwent RARC were included. Propensity score matching was used to match patients based on age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists Score (ASA) score, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score, prior radiation and abdominal surgery, receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and clinical staging. Matched cohorts were compared. Multivariate stepwise logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate variables associated with receiving ICUD, operating time, 90-day high-grade complications (Clavien-Dindo Classification Grade ≥III), and 90-day readmissions after RARC.

Results: Utilisation of ICUD increased from 0% in 2005 to 95% in 2018. The ICUD patients had more overall complications (66% vs 58%, P = 0.01) and readmissions (27% vs 17%, P = 0.01), but not high-grade complications (21% vs 24%, P = 0.22). A more recent RC era and ileal conduit diversion were associated with receiving an ICUD. Higher BMI, ASA score ≥3, and receiving a neobladder were associated with longer operating times. Shorter operating time was associated with male gender, older age, ICUD, and centres with a larger annual average RC volume. Longer intensive care unit stay was associated with 90-day high-grade complications. Higher CCI score, prior radiation therapy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and ICUD were associated with a higher risk of 90-day readmissions.

Conclusions: Utilisation of ICUD has increased over the past decade. ICUD was associated with more overall complications and readmissions compared to ECUD, but not high-grade complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bju.15083DOI Listing
August 2020

Non-Familial Synchronous Bilateral Renal Cell Carcinoma with Bilateral Synchronous Renal Vein Extension and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombus.

Curr Urol 2019 Sep 10;13(1):51-53. Epub 2019 Sep 10.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Bilateral renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus extension into the renal vein and/or inferior vena cava - clinical stage T3a+ - is rare. The majority of these cases arise due to a genetic predisposition. We present a case report of a 47-year-old male with bilateral, synchronous renal cell carcinoma with bilateral renal vein and inferior vena cava tumor thrombi with no identifiable familial predisposition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000499294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6771058PMC
September 2019

Primary Urethral Melanoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Urology 2019 04 31;126:1-4. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Urology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Electronic address:

Patients with localized urethral melanoma have a high risk of recurrence and poor disease-specific survival. Multi-disciplinary approach including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy/immunotherapy is needed to maximize survival. Current research efforts include investigation of novel tyrosine kinases as well as the combination of targeted therapies with immunotherapies in this population. Combinations may provide a synergistic effect to overcome various obstacles to disease response.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2018.12.027DOI Listing
April 2019

Renoalimentary fistula: Case report of a renoduodenal fistula and systematic literature review.

Urol Case Rep 2018 May 2;18:41-43. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Urology, Bronx, NY, 10467, United States.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eucr.2018.02.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5854929PMC
May 2018

partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool.

Urol Ann 2017 Jan-Mar;9(1):107-109

Department of Urology, Glickman Urologic and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0974-7796.198913DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5308027PMC
February 2017

Oncologic Outcomes Following Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy with Bladder Cuff Excision for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

J Urol 2015 Dec 17;194(6):1561-6. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Urology Department, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Electronic address:

Purpose: Robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision is a minimally invasive alternative to open surgery for managing upper tract urothelial carcinoma. We report oncologic outcomes following robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision.

Materials And Methods: The records of the initial 65 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision for upper tract urothelial carcinoma between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed from our institutional review board approved, prospectively maintained database. All patients underwent surgery with the single docking technique. Baseline demographic features, pathological variables and perioperative data were analyzed. Kaplan-Meier methodology was used for survival analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was applied to determine the prognostic effect of different variables on survival.

Results: Mean patient age was 69.1 years. Final pathological evaluation revealed pT2 stage or lower in 65% of patients, pT3 in 28.3% and pT4 in 6.7%. High grade pathological findings were present in 85% of patients, including 13.3% with concomitant carcinoma in situ and 30% with lymphovascular invasion. Median followup was 25.1 months (range 6 to 68.9). At 2 and 5 years overall survival was 86.9% and 62.6%, cancer specific survival was 92.9% and 69.5%, and recurrence-free survival was 65.3% and 57.1%, respectively. A total of 23 patients experienced disease recurrence. Bladder recurrence developed in 15 patients, 12 had isolated bladder recurrence and 8 had metastatic disease. On univariate analysis age greater than 70 years, preoperative hydronephrosis, nodal disease and concomitant carcinoma in situ were significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (p=0.002, 0.04, 0.006 and 0.001, respectively). However, none was statistically significant on multivariate analysis. On univariate analysis impaired preoperative renal function (creatinine greater than 2 mg/dl) and lymphovascular invasion were associated with reduced cancer specific survival (p=0.03 and 0.01, respectively). However, only lymphovascular invasion was associated with decreased cancer specific survival on multivariate analysis (p=0.048).

Conclusions: Our reported data on oncologic outcomes following robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision for upper tract urothelial carcinoma demonstrate satisfactory oncologic control at intermediate term followup. Long-term outcomes are required to assess true efficacy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2015.07.081DOI Listing
December 2015

Does transition from the da Vinci Si to Xi robotic platform impact single-docking technique for robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy?

BJU Int 2015 Dec 18;116(6):990-4. Epub 2015 Jul 18.

Department of Urology, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Objectives: To describe our robot-assisted nephroureterectomy (RNU) technique for benign indications and RNU with en bloc excision of bladder cuff (BCE) and lymphadenectomy (LND) for malignant indications using the da Vinci Si and da Vinci Xi robotic platform, with its pros and cons. The port placement described for Si can be used for standard and S robotic systems. This is the first report in the literature on the use of the da Vinci Xi robotic platform for RNU.

Patients And Methods: After a substantial experience of RNU using different da Vinci robots from the standard to the Si platform in a single-docking fashion for benign and malignant conditions, we started using the newly released da Vinci Xi robot since 2014. The most important differences are in port placement and effective use of the features of da Vinci Xi robot while performing simultaneous upper and lower tract surgery. Patient positioning, port placement, step-by-step technique of single docking RNU-LND-BCE using the da Vinci Si and da Vinci Xi robot are shown in an accompanying video with the goal that centres using either robotic system benefit from the hints and tips. The first segment of video describes RNU-LND-BCE using the da Vinci Si followed by the da Vinci Xi to highlight differences. There was no need for patient repositioning or robot re-docking with the new da Vinci Xi robotic platform.

Results: We have experience of using different robotic systems for single docking RNU in 70 cases for benign (15) and malignant (55) conditions. The da Vinci Xi robotic platform helps operating room personnel in its easy movement, allows easier patient side-docking with the help of its boom feature, in addition to easy and swift movements of the robotic arms. The patient clearance feature can be used to avoid collision with the robotic arms or the patient's body. In patients with challenging body habitus and in situations where bladder cuff management is difficult, modifications can be made through reassigning the camera to a different port with utilisation of the retargeting feature of the da Vinci Xi when working on the bladder cuff or in the pelvis. The vision of the camera used for da Vinci Xi was initially felt to be inferior to that of the da Vinci Si; however, with a subsequent software upgrade this was much improved. The base of the da Vinci Xi is bigger, which does not slide and occasionally requires a change in table placement/operating room setup, and requires side-docking especially when dealing with very tall and obese patients for pelvic surgery.

Conclusions: RNU alone or with LND-BCE is a challenging surgical procedure that addresses the upper and lower urinary tract simultaneously. Single docking and single robotic port placement for RNU-LND-BCE has evolved with the development of different generations of the robotic system. These procedures can be performed safely and effectively using the da Vinci S, Si or Xi robotic platform. The new da Vinci Xi robotic platform is more user-friendly, has easy installation, and is intuitive for surgeons using its features.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bju.13210DOI Listing
December 2015

Should post-kidney transplant patients with localized prostate cancer be undergoing robotic radical prostatectomy?

Int Urol Nephrol 2015 Apr 14;47(4):643-4. Epub 2015 Feb 14.

Urology Department, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-015-0929-9DOI Listing
April 2015

High-dose interleukin-2 therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a contemporary experience.

Urology 2014 May;83(5):1129-34

Department of Urology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY.

Objective: To present our experience of high-dose interleukin-2 (HDIL-2) in a high-volume National Cancer Institute-designated center for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).

Methods: Patients with mRCC who received HDIL-2 monotherapy as a first- or second-line therapy during 2004-2011 were identified. Demographics, pathologic variables, renal function, time until the start of HDIL-2 therapy, number of cycles (1-3), responses (complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease), and primary renal cell carcinoma treatment were analyzed. Progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were determined.

Results: Of 906 patients in the kidney cancer database, 91 patients with mRCC were treated with HDIL-2 and 18 patients (20.5%) underwent prior cytoreductive nephrectomy. Median age was 51 years, and 73.9% were men. Median follow-up was 45 months. Pretreatment renal function impairment led to more treatment cycles (2-3) than in those with adequate initial kidney function (92.3% vs 50.6%, respectively; P = .002). Lower tumor stage correlated with a better response (P = .023) and with longer time from diagnosis to initiation of HDIL-2 (P = .011). Complications included hypotension (67.4%), renal impairment (63%), impaired liver function (42.4%), and thrombocytopenia (31.5%). Four patients (4.5%) had a complete response, 10 (11.4%) had a partial response, and 28 (31.8%) had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival and OS were 8.6 and 35.5 months, respectively. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 60.6%.

Conclusion: Incorporating HDIL-2 therapy in the treatment strategies for mRCC added to the patients' survival in this series. HDIL-2 therapy is well tolerated in patients with pre-existing renal impairment with no long-term renal toxicity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2014.02.005DOI Listing
May 2014

Health-related quality of life outcomes after robot-assisted and open radical cystectomy using a validated bladder-specific instrument: a multi-institutional study.

Urology 2014 Jun 18;83(6):1300-8. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Department of Urology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL) using validated bladder-specific Bladder Cancer Index (BCI) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Body Image scale (BIS) between open radical cystectomy (ORC) and robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC).

Methods: This was a retrospective case series of all patients who underwent radical cystectomy. Patients were grouped based on surgical approach (open vs robot assisted) and diversion technique (extracorporeal vs intracorporeal). Patients completed BCI and BIS preoperatively and at standardized postoperative intervals (at least 2). The primary exposure variable was surgical approach. The primary outcome measure was difference in interval and baseline BCI and BIS scores in each group. The Fisher exact, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for comparisons.

Results: Eighty-two and 100 patients underwent RARC and ORC, respectively. Compared with RARC, more patients undergoing ORC had an American Society of Anesthesiology score≥3 (66% vs 45.1% RARC; P=.007) and shorter median operative time (350 vs 380 minutes; P=.009). Baseline urinary, bowel, sexual function, and body image were not different between both the groups (P=1.0). Longitudinal postoperative analysis revealed better sexual function in ORC group (P=.047), with no significant differences between both the groups in the other 3 domains (P=.11, .58, and .93). Comparisons regarding diversion techniques showed similar findings in baseline and postoperative HRQL data, with no significant differences in the HRQL and body image domains.

Conclusion: RARC has comparable HRQL outcomes to ORC using validated BCI and BIS. The diversion technique used does not seem to affect patients' quality of life.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2014.02.024DOI Listing
June 2014

Readmission after robot-assisted radical cystectomy: outcomes and predictors at 90-day follow-up.

Urology 2014 Feb;83(2):350-6

Department of Urology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY. Electronic address:

Objective: To characterize the outcomes and predictors of readmission after robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) during early (30-day) and late (31-90-day) postoperative periods.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated our prospectively maintained RARC quality assurance database of 272 consecutive patients operated between 2005 and 2012. We evaluated the relationship of readmission with perioperative outcomes and examined possible predictors during the postoperative period.

Results: Overall 30- and 90-day mortality was 0.7% and 4.8%, respectively, with 25.5% patients readmitted within 90 days after RARC (61% of them were readmitted within 30 days and 39% were readmitted between 31-90 days postoperatively). Infection-related problems were the most common cause of readmission during early and late periods. Overall operative time and obesity were significantly associated with readmission (P = .034 and .033, respectively). Body mass index and female gender were independent predictors of 90-day readmission (P = .004 and .014, respectively). Having any type of complication correlated with 90-day readmission (P = .0045); meanwhile, when complications were graded on the basis of Clavien grading system, only grade 1-2 complications statistically correlated with readmission (P = .046). Four patients needed reoperation (2 patients in early "for appendicitis and adhesive small bowel obstruction" and 2 in late "for ureteroenteric stricture" readmission); meanwhile, 6 patients needed percutaneous procedures (4 patients in early "1 for anastomotic leak and 3 for pelvic collections" and 2 "for pelvic collections and ureterocutaneous fistula" in late readmission).

Conclusion: The rate of readmission within 90 days after RARC is significant. Female gender and body mass index are independent predictors of readmission. Outcomes at 90 days provide more thorough results, essential to proper patient counseling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2013.09.056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4431627PMC
February 2014

Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

Clin Nephrol 2014 Nov;82(5):332-6

Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5414/CN107977DOI Listing
November 2014
-->