Publications by authors named "Agnieszka H Ludwig-Galezowska"

5 Publications

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Vascular transcriptome profiling identifies Sphingosine kinase 1 as a modulator of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction.

Sci Rep 2017 03 9;7:44131. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

Department of Internal and Agricultural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Vascular dysfunction is an important phenomenon in hypertension. We hypothesized that angiotensin II (AngII) affects transcriptome in the vasculature in a region-specific manner, which may help to identify genes related to vascular dysfunction in AngII-induced hypertension. Mesenteric artery and aortic transcriptome was profiled using Illumina WG-6v2.0 chip in control and AngII infused (490 ng/kg/min) hypertensive mice. Gene set enrichment and leading edge analyses identified Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) in the highest number of pathways affected by AngII. Sphk1 mRNA, protein and activity were up-regulated in the hypertensive vasculature. Chronic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) infusion resulted in a development of significantly increased vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction. AngII-induced hypertension was blunted in Sphk1 mice (systolic BP 167 ± 4.2 vs. 180 ± 3.3 mmHg, p < 0.05), which was associated with decreased aortic and mesenteric vasoconstriction in hypertensive Sphk1 mice. Pharmacological inhibition of S1P synthesis reduced vasoconstriction of mesenteric arteries. While Sphk1 is important in mediating vasoconstriction in hypertension, Sphk1 mice were characterized by enhanced endothelial dysfunction, suggesting a local protective role of Sphk1 in the endothelium. S1P serum level in humans was correlated with endothelial function (arterial tonometry). Thus, vascular transcriptome analysis shows that S1P pathway is critical in the regulation of vascular function in AngII-induced hypertension, although Sphk1 may have opposing roles in the regulation of vasoconstriction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep44131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5343497PMC
March 2017

Qualitative Parameters of the Colonic Flora in Patients with HNF1A-MODY Are Different from Those Observed in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

J Diabetes Res 2016 11;2016:3876764. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

Department of Metabolic Diseases, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 15 Kopernika Street, 31-501 Kraków, Poland; University Hospital, 36 Kopernika Street, 31-501 Kraków, Poland.

. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by genetic and environmental factors. There have been many studies on the relationship between the composition of the gastrointestinal bacterial flora, T2DM, and obesity. There are no data, however, on the gut microbiome structure in monogenic forms of the disease including Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). . The aim of the investigation was to compare the qualitative parameters of the colonic flora in patients with HNF1AMODY and T2DM and healthy individuals. 16S sequencing of bacterial DNA isolated from the collected fecal samples using the MiSeq platform was performed. . There were significant between-group differences in the bacterial profile. At the phylum level, the amount of Proteobacteria was higher ( = 0.0006) and the amount of Bacteroidetes was lower ( = 0.0005) in T2DM group in comparison to the control group. In HNF1A-MODY group, the frequency of Bacteroidetes was lower than in the control group ( = 0.0143). At the order level, Turicibacterales was more abundant in HNF1A-MODY group than in T2DM group. . It appears that there are differences in the gut microbiome composition between patients with HNF1A-MODY and type 2 diabetes. Further investigation on this matter should be conducted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3876764DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5078663PMC
June 2017

A family with the Arg103Pro mutation in the NEUROD1 gene detected by next-generation sequencing - Clinical characteristics of mutation carriers.

Eur J Med Genet 2016 Feb 8;59(2):75-9. Epub 2016 Jan 8.

Department of Metabolic Diseases, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Krakow, Poland; University Hospital, Krakow, Poland. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: Until now only a few families with early onset autosomal diabetes due to the NEUROD1 gene mutations have been identified. Moreover, only some of them meet strict MODY (maturity-onset diabetes of the young) criteria. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides an opportunity to detect more pathogenic mutations in this gene. Here, we evaluated the segregation of the Arg103Pro mutation in the NEUROD1 gene in a pedigree in which it was detected, and described the clinical characteristics of the mutation carriers.

Methods: We included 156 diabetic probands of MODY families, among them 52 patients earlier tested for GCK-MODY and/or HNF1A-MODY by Sanger sequencing with negative results. Genetic testing was performed by targeted NGS sequencing using a panel of 28 monogenic diabetes genes.

Results: As detected by NGS, one patient had the missense Arg103Pro (CGC/CCC) mutation in the gene NEUROD1 changing the amino-acid structure of the DNA binding domain of this transcription factor. We confirmed this sequence difference by Sanger sequencing. This family had previously been tested with negative results for HNF1A gene mutations. 17 additional members of this family were invited for further testing. We confirmed the presence of the mutation in 11 subjects. Seven adult mutation carriers (all but one) from three generations had been already diagnosed with diabetes. There were 3 individuals with the Arg103Pro mutation diagnosed before the age of 30 years in the family. The range of age of the four unaffected mutation carriers (3 minors and 1 adult) was 3-48 years. Interestingly, one mutation carrier had a history of transient neonatal hypoglycemia, of which the clinical course resembled episodes typical for HNF4A-MODY.

Conclusions: We report a family with autosomal dominant diabetes related to a new NEUROD1 mutation, one of very few meeting MODY criteria. The use of the NGS method will facilitate identification of more families with rare forms of MODY.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2016.01.002DOI Listing
February 2016

Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain, a multifunctional modulator of cell death.

J Cell Mol Med 2011 May;15(5):1044-53

Department of Physiology & Medical Physics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) is a highly potent and multifunctional inhibitor of apoptosis that is physiologically expressed predominantly in post-mitotic cells such as cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle cells and neurons. ARC was also found to be up-regulated in many forms of malignant tumours. ARC impairs the cellular apoptotic responsiveness to a wide range of stresses and insults, including extrinsic apoptosis initiation via death receptor ligands, dysregulation of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress, genotoxic drugs, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress and hypoxia. ARC is subject to both transcriptional and post-translational regulation and exhibits its function through a multitude of molecular interactions with upstream transducers of apoptosis signals. This review summarizes, structures and comments on the published knowledge regarding ARC and its roles in modulating apoptotic cell death responsiveness in physiological and pathophysiological contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1582-4934.2010.01221.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3822617PMC
May 2011

Activity of protein kinase CK2 uncouples Bid cleavage from caspase-8 activation.

J Cell Sci 2010 May 31;123(Pt 9):1401-6. Epub 2010 Mar 31.

Department of Physiology and Medical Physics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, RCSI York House, York Street, Dublin 2, Ireland.

In the present study, we quantitatively analysed the interface between apoptosis initiation and execution by determining caspase-8 activation, Bid cleavage and mitochondrial engagement (onset of mitochondrial depolarisation) in individual HeLa cervical cancer cells following exposure to tumour-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Employing resonance-energy-transfer probes containing either the caspase-8 recognition site IETD or full-length Bid, we observed a significant delay between the times of caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage, suggesting the existence of control steps separating these two processes. Subsequent analyses suggested that the divergence of caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage are critically controlled by kinase signalling: inhibiting protein kinase CK2 by using 5,6-dichloro-l-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1)-benzimidazole (DRB) or by overexpression of a dominant-negative CK2alpha catalytic subunit largely eliminated the lag time between caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage. We conclude that caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage are temporally uncoupled events, providing transient tolerance to caspase-8 activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.061143DOI Listing
May 2010