Publications by authors named "Agata Kostro-Ambroziak"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A new species of Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829 (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Tryphoninae) from China.

Zootaxa 2020 Nov 10;4877(2):zootaxa.4877.2.11. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Laboratory of Insect Evolutionary Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Biology, University of Bialystok, ul. Ciołkowskiego 1J, 15-245 Białystok, Poland.

A new species in the genus Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829, P. xui Kostro-Ambroziak Reshchikov sp. n. is described from the Yunnan Province of China. An identification key for the eight species of Phytodietus currently recorded in Mainland China is provided. P. longicauda (Uchida, 1931) is recorded for the first time in China and P. spinipes (Cameron, 1905) is recorded in Guangdong and Hunan Provinces.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4877.2.11DOI Listing
November 2020

The genus Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Tryphoninae) in Kenya, with the description of a new species.

Zootaxa 2020 May 13;4778(1):zootaxa.4778.1.8. Epub 2020 May 13.

Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology, NAS of Ukraine, B. Khmelnytskogo Str. 15, Kyiv 01030, Ukraine.

Two species of the genus Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829 are recorded from Kenya: the previously documented P. (Phytodietus) varicolor Seyrig, 1935 and a newly described P. (Weisia) kasarani sp. n. A key to the Afrotropical Phytodietus species of the subgenus Weisia Schmiedeknecht, 1907 is provided.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4778.1.8DOI Listing
May 2020

Development of microsatellite loci and optimization of a multiplex assay for Latibulus argiolus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), the specialized parasitoid of paper wasps.

Sci Rep 2020 09 30;10(1):16068. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Museum and Institute of Zoology Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, 00-679, Warsaw, Poland.

Microsatellite loci are commonly used markers in population genetic studies. In this study, we present 40 novel and polymorphic microsatellite loci elaborated for the ichneumonid parasitoid Latibulus argiolus (Rossi, 1790). Reaction condition optimisation procedures allowed 14 of these loci to be co-amplified in two PCRs and loaded in two multiplex panels onto a genetic analyser. The assay was tested on 197 individuals of L. argiolus originating from ten natural populations obtained from the host nests of paper wasps. The validated loci were polymorphic with high allele numbers ranging from eight to 27 (average 17.6 alleles per locus). Both observed and expected heterozygosity values were high, ranging between 0.75 and 0.92 for H (mean 0.83) and from 0.70 to 0.90 for H (mean 0.85). The optimized assay showed low genotyping error rate and negligible null allele frequency. The designed multiplex panels could be successfully applied in relatedness analyses and genetic variability studies of L. argiolus populations, which would be particularly interesting considering the coevolutionary context of this species with its social host.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-72923-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7527953PMC
September 2020

Sexual differences in age-dependent survival and life span of adults in a natural butterfly population.

Sci Rep 2020 06 25;10(1):10394. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

MTA-ELTE-MTM Ecology Research Group, Pázmány Péter s. 1/C., Budapest, 1117, Hungary.

Adult survival and longevity in insects are key life-history traits, but their variation between sexes and individuals in natural populations is largely unexplored. Sexual divergence in senescence, the decline in survival with age is also poorly understood. Based on an intensive mark-recapture dataset of the butterfly Polyommatus daphnis, we aimed to assess whether adult survival is age-dependent, and to estimate life span distribution and abundance of males and females using Cormack-Jolly-Seber and Jolly-Seber models. Female survival slightly increased with date of emergence and slightly decreased with age, while male survival considerably declined with age. Mean life span of females (12.7 days) was ~50% higher than that of males (8.5 days), but two times higher if only the oldest 5% of each sex was considered (39 vs.19 days). Abundance of females (358 ± 14) and males (359 ± 11) was similar, but peak abundance of males preceded that of females by 11 days. Our results suggest that senescence is much more rapid in males than in females in this butterfly, which is in agreement with sexual selection theory. We also conclude that estimating life span distributions provides much more valuable information on the demography of natural populations than simply reporting the mean life span.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66922-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7316833PMC
June 2020

Cross-continental phylogeography of two Holarctic Nymphalid butterflies, Boloria eunomia and Boloria selene.

PLoS One 2019 26;14(3):e0214483. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Entomology, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.

Pleistocene glaciations had significant effects on the distribution and evolution of species inhabiting the Holarctic region. Phylogeographic studies concerning the entire region are still rare. Here, we compared global phylogeographic patterns of one boreo-montane and one boreo-temperate butterflies with largely overlapping distribution ranges across the Northern Hemisphere, but with different levels of range fragmentation and food specialization. We reconstructed the global phylogeographic history of the boreo-montane specialist Boloria eunomia (n = 223) and of the boreo-temperate generalist Boloria selene (n = 106) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers, and with species distribution modelling (SDM). According to the genetic structures obtained, both species show a Siberian origin and considerable split among populations from Nearctic and Palaearctic regions. According to SDMs and molecular data, both butterflies could inhabit vast areas during the moderate glacials. In the case of B. selene, high haplotype diversity and low geographic structure suggest long-lasting interconnected gene flow among populations. A stronger geographic structuring between populations was identified in the specialist B. eunomia, presumably due to the less widespread, heterogeneously distributed food resources, associated with cooler and more humid climatic conditions. Populations of both species show opposite patterns across major parts of North America and in the case of B. eunomia also across Asia. Our data underline the relevance to cover entire distribution ranges to reconstruct the correct phylogeographic history of species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0214483PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435151PMC
December 2019

First report of the genus Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829 (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Tryphoninae) from Thailand.

Biodivers Data J 2016 28(4):e8027. Epub 2016 Apr 28.

Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: The genus Phytodietus Gravenhorst, 1829 is a species rich group of ichneumonid parasitoid wasps. It is represented in all zoogeographical regions, but knowledge of Phytodietus species in the Oriental region is patchy and restricted to some countries.

New Information: Here the genus Phytodietus is recorded from Thailand for the first time based on three species. Diagnosis and illustrations of P. longicauda (Uchida, 1931), P. pitambari Kaur et Jonathan, 1979 and P. spinipes (Cameron, 1905) are given. Furthermore, known distributional and biological data of the species are summarised and an identification key to the species is provided.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.4.e8027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4867693PMC
May 2016