Publications by authors named "Adrienne Quinn"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An unusual presentation of post gastric bypass hypoglycemia with both postprandial and fasting hypoglycemia

Endocrinol Diabetes Metab Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;2018:18-0089. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Keck School of Medicine, LAC+USC Medical Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

There has been an increasing awareness of post gastric bypass hypoglycemia (PGBH). Histopathologic findings from such patients who underwent partial/total pancreatomy, however, can vary widely from minimal changes to classic nesidioblastosis, making the pathologic diagnosis challenging. PGBH typically presents as postprandial hypoglycemia, as opposed to insulinoma, which presents as fasting hypoglycemia. Herein, we describe an unusual case of a patient with PGBH who initially presented with postprandial hypoglycemia three years after surgery, but later developed fasting hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia as the disease progressed. Our hypothesis for this phenomenon is that this disease is progressive, and later in its course, the insulin release becomes dissociated from food stimulation and is increased at baseline. Future studies are needed to investigate the prevalence as well as etiology of this progression from postprandial to fasting hypoglycemia. Learning points: •• There has been an increasing awareness of post gastric bypass hypoglycemia (PGBH). •• Histopathologically, PGBH can vary from minimal changes to nesidioblastosis. •• Although uncommon, patients with PGBH after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass may present with both postprandial and fasting hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia as disease progresses. •• Our hypothesis for this phenomenon is that the insulin release becomes dissociated from food stimulation and is increased at baseline with disease progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/EDM-18-0089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215949PMC
October 2018

Periosteal turndown flap for posterior occipitocervical fusion: a technique review.

Eur Spine J 2017 09 2;26(9):2303-2307. Epub 2017 May 2.

Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd, MS#69, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, USA.

Purpose: Recently, several authors have proposed techniques for improving the fusion rate in pediatric posterior occipitocervical fusion including a variety of implants and the use of bone morphogenetic protein. A technique by Koop et al. using a periosteal flap for occipitocervical arthrodesis was described in 1984.

Methods: A straight incision is made about the posterior neck to expose the occipitocervical region from the inion superiorly to the lowest cervical vertebrae to be fused inferiorly. The occiput is exposed superficial to the periosteum, which is then reflected and elevated from the occiput. The attachment is preserved at the caudal base of the flap and reflected over the intended area of fusion. When possible, fixation is then performed with cables, wires, screws, hooks, or plates.

Case Example: A 6-year-old male with an occiput to C2 distraction injury underwent posterior spinal fusion from occiput to C3 using sublaminar wires, periosteal turndown flap, and autologous iliac crest bone graft.

Conclusion: In small children with traumatic upper cervical spine instability, the periosteal turndown technique may be used as a safe adjunct for occipitocervical fusions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-017-5085-8DOI Listing
September 2017

Outcomes after mitral valve repair: A single-center 16-year experience.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2017 09 9;154(3):822-830.e2. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

Department of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.

Objective: To evaluate outcomes after mitral valve repair.

Methods: Between May 1999 and June 2015, 446 patients underwent mitral valve repair. Isolated mitral valve annuloplasty was excluded. A total of 398 (89%) had degenerative valve disease. Mean follow-up was 5.5 ± 3.8 years. Postoperative echocardiograms were obtained in 334 patients (75%) at a mean of 24.3 ± 13.7 months.

Results: Survival was 97%, 96%, 95%, and 94% at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years. Risk factor analysis showed age >60 years and nondegenerative etiology predict death (hazard ratio, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.02, P = .038; and hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-3.02, P = .010, respectively). Considering competing risks due to mortality, the cumulative incidence of reoperation was 2.8%, 4.2%, 5.1%, and 9.6% at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years. Competing risk proportional hazard survival regression identified nondegenerative etiology and previous cardiac surgery as predictors of reoperation, and posterior repair was protective (all P < .05). Cumulative incidence of progression of mitral regurgitation (2 or more grades) with mortality as a competing risk was 4.7%, 10.5%, 21.0%, and 35.8% at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years. Patients with previous sternotomy, repair or coronary artery bypass grafting, and concurrent tricuspid valve procedure or isolated anterior leaflet repair were more likely to develop progression of mitral regurgitation (all P < .05), and posterior leaflet repair was protective (P = .038). On multivariate analysis diabetes, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and concurrent tricuspid valve intervention predicted MR progression.

Conclusions: Mitral valve repair has excellent outcomes. Our results demonstrate failures appear to occur less in those who undergo posterior leaflet repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2017.01.047DOI Listing
September 2017

Arsenite accumulation in the mouse eye.

J Toxicol Environ Health A 2016 ;79(8):339-41

a Department of Environmental Health Sciences , Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health , New York , New York , USA.

Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in drinking water are a major worldwide public health concern. Exposure to As is associated with carcinogenesis, skin lesions, cardiovascular disease, cognitive deficits, and other disorders. However, little is known regarding chronic As-mediated effects on the eye. Oxidative stress is believed to be an important factor in As-related pathology and is also implicated in certain eye diseases such as cataract. Thus, elevated exposure to arsenic could potentially be a contributing factor for ocular pathology. A pilot study was therefore initiated to determine whether As could be detected in eye tissue of mice exposed to sodium arsenite in drinking water. Total As concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy in whole eyes, lens, liver, heart, lung, kidneys, spleen, brain, and hair from mice given 0, 10, 50, or 250 ppm sodium arsenite in their drinking water for 4 wk or 0, 10 or 50 ppm for 6 mo. Dose-dependent increases in As concentration were observed in all organs and tissues. Surprisingly, As concentrations in the eye and lens were significantly higher than those in liver, lung, heart, spleen, and brain and similar to that found in kidneys. The relatively high concentration in the eye, and the lens in particular, suggests As exposure may be a contributing factor in cataract formation in parts of the world where As in drinking water is endemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15287394.2016.1151392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982701PMC
May 2017

Open label study to assess infliximab safety and timing of onset of clinical benefit among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2002 Apr;29(4):667-77

Centocor Inc., Malvern, Pennsylvania, USA.

Objective: To assess the timing of onset of clinical benefit following the initial infusion of infliximab and to obtain additional safety experience of infliximab when given in an office setting to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, the safety of reducing the infusion time from 2 hours to 1 hour was evaluated.

Methods: Patients (n = 553) with active RA despite receiving methotrexate (MTX) were treated with infliximab 3 mg/kg given over 2 h at baseline (Week 0), and Weeks 2, 6, and 14 in this multicenter open-label trial. Patients continued to receive a stable dose of MTX (> or = 7.5 mg/wk). At selected sites, patients tolerating the first 4 infusions were eligible to receive 2 additional infusions at twice the usual infusion rate (given over 1 h). Patients returned for efficacy assessments at 48 h following the initial infusion and several times throughout study participation.

Results: By 48 h following the first infusion, significant (p < 0.001) improvements were observed in duration of morning stiffness (34% mean improvement), physician's global disease assessment scores (30%), patient's global disease assessment scores (25%), and patient's pain assessment scores (30%). By Week 16, 52 to 63% mean improvements in these efficacy variables were observed (p < 0.001), the significant improvement was maintained through the end of study participation in the subset of patients who received the additional 1 h infliximab infusions. Through 16 weeks, 10% (54/553) of patients reported an adverse event associated with at least 1 of the 4 infusion procedures; the majority were mild and transient in nature. In the subset of 197 patients who received 2 additional infusions over 1 h, no increase in the frequency or severity of infusion-related adverse events was observed compared to the 2 h infusion.

Conclusion: Infliximab administered to patients with RA in an outpatient setting resulted in significant clinical improvement within 48 h that was sustained with additional infusions. Approximately 10% of patients experienced an infusion reaction, highlighting the need for direct supervision over patient treatment. Patients who tolerated infliximab infusions given over 2 h also tolerated a 1 h infusion.
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April 2002