Publications by authors named "Adrien Plumecocq"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A New High Hydrostatic Pressure Process to Assure the Microbial Safety of Human Milk While Preserving the Biological Activity of Its Main Components.

Front Public Health 2018 6;6:306. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Neonatology Nutrition, Lactarium Bordeaux-Marmande, CIC Pédiatrique 1401 Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France.

The main process used to pasteurize human milk is the low-temperature, long-time Holder method. More recently, the high-temperature, short-time method has been investigated. Both processes lead to the appropriate inactivation of vegetative bacterial forms but are ineffective against bacterial spores. We aimed to accomplish two main objectives: inactivation of all pathogens, including spores; and preservation of the activity of milk components. Recently, a novel high-hydrostatic pressure process has been developed by HPBioTECH. Using the same raw human milk samples, we compared the effects of this method with those of the Holder method on vegetative and spore forms of pathogens and on bioactive components (lipase activity, immunoproteins). Two main microbial strains were selected: (as a reference for vegetative forms) and (as a reference for spores). Use of the high-hydrostatic pressure process led to microbial decontamination of 6 log for both and . Additionally, the bioactivity of the main components of human milk was preserved, with activities of lipase, α-lactalbumin, casein, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and sIgA of ~80, 96-99, 98-100, 95-100, 93-97, and 63-64%, respectively. Use of this novel high-hydrostatic pressure process to generate microbiologically safe human milk may provide important benefits for preterm infants, including improved assimilation of human milk (leading increased weight gain) and improved resistance to infections. Because 10% of all human milk collected is contaminated by , use of this method will also prevent waste.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00306DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6232532PMC
November 2018

In vitro characterization of calcium phosphate biomaterial loaded with linezolid for osseous bone defect implantation.

J Biomater Appl 2012 Mar 28;26(7):811-28. Epub 2010 Sep 28.

INSERM, U 791, Laboratoire d'Ingénierie Ostéo-Articulaire et Dentaire, LIOAD, Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, 1 Place A. Ricordeau, Nantes, F-44042, France.

Osteomyelitis is a severe bone infection frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus, which shows significant resistance to methicillin. One therapeutic treatment would be to insert a bone substitute loaded to an antibiotic, which would enable the bone to be filled while the illness is being treated. Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with a large spectrum of action. It is effective against most Gram-positive bacteria and displays a specific mode of action. The aim of this work was to study the association of linezolid with a calcium phosphate-deficient apatite matrix. Granules containing 10% and 50% linezolid were prepared by wet granulation and characterized. Porosity analyses performed by mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy revealed that grain porosity with 50% linezolid was higher than that of the grains containing 10% linezolid. NMR analyses showed no change in structure of linezolid when linked to calcium-deficient apatite. These results were confirmed by studying the antibacterial activity of linezolid, which remained proportional to the quantity of loaded linezolid, proving that the antibiotic released was active. The in vitro release time varied from 9 days for granules containing 10% linezolid to 26 days for granules containing 50% linezolid.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885328210381535DOI Listing
March 2012