Publications by authors named "Adrianna N Masterson"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multiplexed and High-Throughput Label-Free Detection of RNA/Spike Protein/IgG/IgM Biomarkers of SARS-CoV-2 Infection Utilizing Nanoplasmonic Biosensors.

Anal Chem 2021 06 14;93(25):8754-8763. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N Blackford Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, United States.

To tackle the COVID-19 outbreak, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), there is an unmet need for highly accurate diagnostic tests at all stages of infection with rapid results and high specificity. Here, we present a label-free nanoplasmonic biosensor-based, multiplex screening test for COVID-19 that can quantitatively detect 10 different biomarkers (6 viral nucleic acid genes, 2 spike protein subunits, and 2 antibodies) with a limit of detection in the aM range, all within one biosensor platform. Our newly developed nanoplasmonic biosensors demonstrate high specificity, which is of the upmost importance to avoid false responses. As a proof of concept, we show that our detection approach has the potential to quantify both IgG and IgM antibodies directly from COVID-19-positive patient plasma samples in a single instrument run, demonstrating the high-throughput capability of our detection approach. Most importantly, our assay provides receiving operating characteristics, areas under the curve of 0.997 and 0.999 for IgG and IgM, respectively. The calculated -value determined through the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test is <0.0001 for both antibodies when the test of COVID-19-positive patients ( = 80) is compared with that of healthy individuals ( = 72). Additionally, the screening test provides a calculated sensitivity (true positive rate) of 100% (80/80), a specificity (true negative rate) >96% (77/80), a positive predictive value of 98% at 5% prevalence, and a negative predictive value of 100% at 5% prevalence. We believe that our very sensitive, multiplex, high-throughput testing approach has potential applications in COVID-19 diagnostics, particularly in determining virus progression and infection severity for clinicians for an appropriate treatment, and will also prove to be a very effective diagnostic test when applied to diseases beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c05300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8230954PMC
June 2021

Enhancing Nonfouling and Sensitivity of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates for Potent Drug Analysis in Blood Plasma via Fabrication of a Flexible Plasmonic Patch.

Anal Chem 2021 02 12;93(4):2578-2588. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N. Blackford Street, Indianapolis 46202, Indiana, United States.

Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an ultrasensitive analytical technique, which is capable of providing high specificity; thus, it can be used for toxicological drug assay (detection and quantification). However, SERS-based drug analysis directly in human biofluids requires mitigation of fouling and nonspecificity effects that commonly appeared from unwanted adsorption of endogenous biomolecules present in biofluids (e.g., blood plasma and serum) onto the SERS substrate. Here, we report a bottom-up fabrication strategy to prepare ultrasensitive SERS substrates, first, by functionalizing chemically synthesized gold triangular nanoprisms (Au TNPs) with poly(ethylene glycol)-thiolate in the solid state to avoid protein fouling and second, by generating flexible plasmonic patches to enhance SERS sensitivity via the formation of high-intensity electromagnetic hot spots. Poly(ethylene glycol)-thiolate-functionalized Au TNPs in the form of flexible plasmonic patches show a twofold-improved signal-to-noise ratio in comparison to triethylamine (TEA)-passivated Au TNPs. Furthermore, the plasmonic patch displays a SERS enhancement factor of 4.5 ×10. Utilizing the Langmuir adsorption model, we determine the adsorption constant of drugs for two different surface ligands and observe that the drug molecules display stronger affinity for poly(ethylene glycol) ligands than TEA. Our density functional theory calculations unequivocally support the interaction between drug molecules and poly(ethylene glycol) moieties. Furthermore, the universality of the plasmonic patch for SERS-based drug detection is demonstrated for cocaine, JWH-018, and opioids (fentanyl, despropionyl fentanyl, and heroin) and binary mixture (trace amount of fentanyl in heroin) analyses. We demonstrate the applicability of flexible plasmonic patches for the selective assay of fentanyl at picogram/milliliter concentration levels from drug-of-abuse patients' blood plasma. The fentanyl concentration calculated in the patients' blood plasma from SERS analysis is in excellent agreement with the values determined using the paper spray ionization mass spectrometry technique. We believe that the flexible plasmonic patch fabrication strategy would be widely applicable to any plasmonic nanostructure for SERS-based chemical sensing for clinical toxicology and therapeutic drug monitoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c04643DOI Listing
February 2021

Optimization of electromagnetic hot spots in surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for an ultrasensitive drug assay of emergency department patients' plasma.

Analyst 2020 Nov;145(23):7662-7672

Department Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA.

Herein we report the programmable preparation of ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based nanoplasmonic superlattice substrates to assay fentanyl and cocaine (detection and quantification) from 10 μL aliquots of emergency department patient plasma without the need for purification steps. Highly homogeneous three-dimensional (3D) nanoplasmonic superlattices are generated through the droplet evaporation-based self-assembly process of chemically-synthesized, polyethylene glycol thiolate-coated gold triangular nanoprisms (Au TNPs). Close-packed, solid-state 3D superlattice substrates produce electromagnetic hot spots due to near-field plasmonic coupling of Au TNPs, which display unique localized surface plasmonic resonance properties. These uniquely prepared superlattice substrates enable strong SERS enhancement to achieve a parts-per-quadrillion limit of detection using the label-free SERS-based technique. Our reported limit of detection is at least 100-fold better than any known SERS substrates for the drug assay. Importantly, our density functional theory calculations show that a specific electronic interaction between the drug molecule and novel nanoplasmonic superlattice substrates plays a critical role that may trigger achieving this unprecedentedly high sensitivity. Additionally, we show high selectivity of the superlattice substrate in the SERS-based detection of analytes from different patient samples, which do and do not contain target analytes (i.e., fentanyl and/or cocaine). The demonstrated sensitivity and selectivity of 3D superlattice substrates for SERS-based drug analysis in real toxicological samples are expected to advance the field of measurement science, and forensic and clinical toxicology by obviating the need for complicated sample processing steps, long assay times, and the low sensitivity of existing "gold standard" analytical techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Taken together, we believe that this entirely new and reproducible superlattice substrate for the SERS analysis will aid scientific, forensic, and healthcare communities to battle the drug overdose epidemic in the United States.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0an01372bDOI Listing
November 2020

A novel liquid biopsy-based approach for highly specific cancer diagnostics: mitigating false responses in assaying patient plasma-derived circulating microRNAs through combined SERS and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence analyses.

Analyst 2020 Jun 3;145(12):4173-4180. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N. Blackford Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA.

Studies have shown that microRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, hold tremendous promise as next-generation circulating biomarkers for early cancer detection via liquid biopsies. A novel, solid-state nanoplasmonic sensor capable of assaying circulating microRNAs through a combined surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF) approach has been developed. Here, the unique localized surface plasmon resonance properties of chemically-synthesized gold triangular nanoprisms (Au TNPs) are utilized to create large SERS and PEF enhancements. With careful modification to the surface of Au TNPs, this sensing approach is capable of quantifying circulating microRNAs at femtogram/microliter concentrations. Uniquely, the multimodal analytical methods mitigate both false positive and false negative responses and demonstrate the high stability of our sensors within bodily fluids. As a proof of concept, microRNA-10b and microRNA-96 were directly assayed from the plasma of six bladder cancer patients. Results show potential for a highly specific liquid biopsy method that could be used in point-of-care clinical diagnostics to increase early cancer detection or any other diseases including SARS-CoV-2 in which RNAs can be used as biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0an00538jDOI Listing
June 2020

Bottom-Up Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanoantenna-Based High-throughput Multiplexing Biosensors for Ultrasensitive Detection of microRNAs Directly from Cancer Patients' Plasma.

Anal Chem 2020 07 11;92(13):9295-9304. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N Blackford Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, United States.

There is an unmet need in clinical point-of-care (POC) cancer diagnostics for early state disease detection, which would greatly increase patient survival rates. Currently available analytical techniques for early stage cancer diagnosis do not meet the requirements for POC of a clinical setting. They are unable to provide the high demand of multiplexing, high-throughput, and ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers directly from low volume patient samples ("liquid biopsy"). To overcome these current technological bottle-necks, herein we present, for the first time, a bottom-up fabrication strategy to develop plasmonic nanoantenna-based sensors that utilize the unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of chemically synthesized gold nanostructures, gold triangular nanoprisms (Au TNPs), gold nanorods (Au NRs), and gold spherical nanoparticles (Au SNPs). Our Au TNPs, NRs, and SNPs display refractive index unit (RIU) sensitivities of 318, 225, and 135 nm/RIU respectively. Based on the RIU results, we developed plasmonic nanoantenna-based multiplexing and high-throughput biosensors for the ultrasensitive assay of microRNAs. MicroRNAs are directly linked with cancer development, progression, and metastasis, thus they hold promise as next generation biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The developed biosensors are capable of assaying five different types of microRNAs at an attomolar detection limit. These sets of microRNAs include both oncogenic and tumor suppressor microRNAs. To demonstrate the efficiency as a POC cancer diagnostic tool, we analyzed the plasma of 20-bladder cancer patients without any sample processing steps. Importantly, our liquid biopsy-based biosensing approach is capable of differentiating healthy from early ("non-metastatic") and late ("metastatic") stage cancer with a value <0.0001. Further, receiver operating characteristic analysis shows that our biosensing approach is highly specific, with an area under the curve of 1.0. Additionally, our plasmonic nanoantenna-based biosensors are regenerative, allowing multiple measurements using the same biosensors, which is essential in low- and middle-income countries. Taken together, our multiplexing and high-throughput biosensors have the unmatched potential to advance POC diagnostics and meet global needs for early stage detection of cancer and other diseases (e.g., infectious, autoimmune, and neurogenerative diseases).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c01639DOI Listing
July 2020

Plasmoelectronic-Based Ultrasensitive Assay of Tumor Suppressor microRNAs Directly in Patient Plasma: Design of Highly Specific Early Cancer Diagnostic Technology.

Anal Chem 2019 02 22;91(3):1894-1903. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology , Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis , 402 N. Blackford Street , Indianapolis , Indiana 46202 , United States.

It is becoming understood that microRNAs hold great promise for noninvasive liquid biopsies for screening for different types of cancer, but current state-of-the-art RT-PCR and microarray techniques have sensitivity limitations that currently restrict their use. Herein, we report a new transduction mechanism involving delocalization of photoexcited conduction electrons wave function of gold triangular nanoprism (Au TNP) in the presence of -ssDNA/microRNA duplexes. This plasmoelectronic effect increases the electronic dimension of Au TNPs and substantially affects their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties that together allow us to achieve a sensitivity for microRNA assay as low as 140 zeptomolar concentrations for our nanoplasmonic sensors. We show that the position of a single base-pair mismatch in the -ssDNA/microRNA duplex dramatically alters the LSPR properties and detection sensitivity. The unprecedentedly high sensitivity of nanoplasmonic sensors has allowed us to assay four different microRNAs (microRNA-10b, -182, -143, and -145) from bladder cancer patient plasma (50 μL/sample). For the first time, we demonstrate the utility of a label-free, nanoplasmonic sensor in quantification of tumor suppressor microRNAs, the level of tumor suppressor microRNAs goes down in a cancer patient as compared to normal healthy individuals, in metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer patient plasma. Our statistical analysis of patient samples unequivocally suggests that the tumor suppressor microRNAs are more specific biomarkers ( p-value of <0.0001) than oncogenic microRNAs for differentiation between metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer, and nonmetastatic cancer from healthy individuals. This work demonstrating the electron wave functions delocalization dependent ultrasensitive LSPR properties of noble metal nanoparticles has a great potential for fabrication of miniaturized and extremely powerful sensors to investigate microRNA properties in other cancers (for example breast, lung, and pancreatic) through liquid biopsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.8b03768DOI Listing
February 2019
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