Publications by authors named "Adriana Garibay-Hernández"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Untargeted metabotyping to study phenylpropanoid diversity in crop plants.

Physiol Plant 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Leibniz Institute for Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben, Germany.

Plant genebanks constitute a key resource for breeding to ensure crop yield under changing environmental conditions. Because of their roles in a range of stress responses, phenylpropanoids are promising targets. Phenylpropanoids comprise a wide array of metabolites; however, studies regarding their diversity and the underlying genes are still limited for cereals. The assessment of barley diversity via genotyping-by-sequencing is in rapid progress. Exploring these resources by integrating genetic association studies to in-depth metabolomic profiling provides a valuable opportunity to study barley phenylpropanoid metabolism; but poses a challenge by demanding large-scale approaches. Here, we report an LC-PDA-MS workflow for barley high-throughput metabotyping. Without prior construction of a species-specific library, this method produced phenylpropanoid-enriched metabotypes with which the abundance of putative metabolic features was assessed across hundreds of samples in a single-processed data matrix. The robustness of the analytical performance was tested using a standard mix and extracts from two selected cultivars: Scarlett and Barke. The large-scale analysis of barley extracts showed (1) that barley flag leaf profiles were dominated by glycosylation derivatives of isovitexin, isoorientin, and isoscoparin; (2) proved the workflow's capability to discriminate within genotypes; (3) highlighted the role of glycosylation in barley phenylpropanoid diversity. Using the barley S42IL mapping population, the workflow proved useful for metabolic quantitative trait loci purposes. The protocol can be readily applied not only to explore the barley phenylpropanoid diversity represented in genebanks but also to study species whose profiles differ from those of cereals: the crop Helianthus annuus (sunflower) and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppl.13458DOI Listing
May 2021

Hydroxycinnamic acids in sunflower leaves serve as UV-A screening pigments.

Photochem Photobiol Sci 2019 Jul;18(7):1649-1659

Department of Ecophysiology of Plants, Botanical Institute, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany.

Flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, which are located in the upper epidermis of plants, are well known to screen ultraviolet radiation, thus protecting the underlying tissue from these harmful wavelengths. Both classes of secondary products complement each other over the UV spectral region according to their absorption spectra: flavonoids are most efficient as UV-A attenuators while hydroxycinnamates (HCAs) screen well within the UV-B region. Analysis of epidermal transmittance revealed a substantial UV-A screen in Helianthus annuus L. cv. Peredovick. Identifying responsible pigments by HPLC-MS, we found surprisingly low amounts of flavonoids but dominant abundance of the HCA derivatives chlorogenic and di-caffeoyl quinic acid. Both display low UV-A absorbance and thus, should contribute only a little to UV-A protection. However, growth at high light led to a decrease of epidermal transmittance at 366 nm of up to 90%. Underpinning the screening role, HCA autofluorescence microscopy revealed storage to occur predominantly in vacuoles of the upper epidermis. UV-A treatment in the absence of D1-repair resulted in photosystem II inactivation proportional to epidermal UV-A transmittance. Our findings suggest that UV-A protection can be achieved solely with HCAs, apparently through accumulation of high amounts of these compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8pp00440dDOI Listing
July 2019

Single cell-type analysis of cellular lipid remodelling in response to salinity in the epidermal bladder cells of the model halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

Plant Cell Environ 2018 10 3;41(10):2390-2403. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Salt stress causes dramatic changes in the organization and dynamic properties of membranes, however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Modified trichomes, known as epidermal bladder cells (EBC), on the leaves and stems of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum can be successfully exploited as a single-cell-type system to investigate salt-induced changes to cellular lipid composition. In this study, alterations in key molecular species from different lipid classes highlighted an increase in phospholipid species, particularly those from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid (PA), where the latter is central to the synthesis of membrane lipids. Triacylglycerol (TG) species decreased during salinity, while there was little change in plastidic galactolipids. EBC transcriptomic and proteomic data mining revealed changes in genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and the upregulation of transcripts for PIPKIB, PI5PII, PIPKIII, and phospholipase D delta suggested the induction of signalling processes mediated by phosphoinositides and PA. TEM and flow cytometry showed the dynamic nature of lipid droplets in these cells under salt stress. Altogether, this work indicates that the metabolism of TG might play an important role in EBC response to salinity as either an energy reserve for sodium accumulation and/or driving membrane biosynthesis for EBC expansion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pce.13352DOI Listing
October 2018

Membrane Proteomic Insights into the Physiology and Taxonomy of an Oleaginous Green Microalga.

Plant Physiol 2017 01 8;173(1):390-416. Epub 2016 Nov 8.

Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62210 Mexico (A.G.-H., R.V.-E., A.M., O.P.); and

Ettlia oleoabundans is a nonsequenced oleaginous green microalga. Despite the significant biotechnological interest in producing value-added compounds from the acyl lipids of this microalga, a basic understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of oleaginous microalgae is lacking, especially under nitrogen deprivation conditions known to trigger lipid accumulation. Using an RNA sequencing-based proteomics approach together with manual annotation, we are able to provide, to our knowledge, the first membrane proteome of an oleaginous microalga. This approach allowed the identification of novel proteins in E. oleoabundans, including two photoprotection-related proteins, Photosystem II Subunit S and Maintenance of Photosystem II under High Light1, which were considered exclusive to higher photosynthetic organisms, as well as Retinitis Pigmentosa Type 2-Clathrin Light Chain, a membrane protein with a novel domain architecture. Free-flow zonal electrophoresis of microalgal membranes coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proved to be a useful technique for determining the intracellular location of proteins of interest. Carbon-flow compartmentalization in E. oleoabundans was modeled using this information. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of protein markers and 18S ribosomal DNA support the reclassification of E. oleoabundans within the trebouxiophycean microalgae, rather than with the Chlorophyceae class, in which it is currently classified, indicating that it may not be closely related to the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii A detailed survey of biological processes taking place in the membranes of nitrogen-deprived E. oleoabundans, including lipid metabolism, provides insights into the basic biology of this nonmodel organism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.16.01240DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5210721PMC
January 2017

Nitrogen limitation in Neochloris oleoabundans: a reassessment of its effect on cell growth and biochemical composition.

Appl Biochem Biotechnol 2013 Dec 3;171(7):1775-91. Epub 2013 Sep 3.

Departamento de Ingeniería Celular y Biocatálisis, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 510-3, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62250, Mexico.

The aim of this work was to reassess the effect of nitrogen limitation (from 0 to 1 mM nitrate), on the growth and the biochemical composition of Neochloris oleoabundans cultures, where only the CO2 available in the air was provided. Slight differences in the initial nitrate concentration, even minimal increments of 0.2 mM, significantly modify the microalgal response towards nitrogen limitation. This stress condition reduced cell proliferation, but increased cell mass values due to the simultaneous accumulation of two storage compounds: lipids, which contained up to a 55.9 % of total fatty acids; and carbohydrates, which may be primarily composed by starch. The highest biomass and lipid productivities of 98.24 and 43.24 mg/l/day, respectively, were attained at an initial nitrate concentration of 0.6 mM. The theoretical annual projection, based on these productivities, allowed the estimation of the liquid fuel energy yields, which are comparable or even higher than those calculated for several biomass feedstocks such as corn, oil palm, sugarcane, or even fast growing grasses, confirming the potential of nitrogen-limited N. oleoabundans biomass as an appropriate feedstock for biofuel purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12010-013-0454-1DOI Listing
December 2013