Publications by authors named "Adrian Ys Lee"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Granulomatous skin lesions of common variable immunodeficiency treated with sirolimus.

Australas J Dermatol 2021 Mar 4. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Department of Immunopathology, NSW Pathology and Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajd.13574DOI Listing
March 2021

CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

Immunol Cell Biol 2020 Nov 2;98(10):845-853. Epub 2020 Aug 2.

Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui Province, PR China.

The CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) and its sole chemokine ligand, CCL20, are an intriguing pair that have been implicated in a growing number of inflammatory, autoimmune and malignant disease processes. Recent observations have also highlighted this chemokine axis in the regulation of humoral immune responses. Through this review article, we explore the emerging links of CCR6-CCL20 with an archetypal autoimmune disease of humoral dysregulation: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). CCR6 is expressed prominently on several immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of SLE, such as dendritic cells and T-helper 17 cells. CCR6's expression is correlated with disease activity and serological markers of disease severity, suggesting a possible role in disease pathogenesis. However, there are numerous holes in our understanding of the functions of CCR6 and CCL20, and future studies are required to determine if there are any diagnostic, prognostic or monitoring roles for these important molecules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imcb.12375DOI Listing
November 2020

Rapid publishing in the era of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Med J Aust 2020 06 31;212(11):535-535.e1. Epub 2020 May 31.

Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja2.50617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7300894PMC
June 2020

Molecular typing of cryoglobulins by mass spectrometry.

Ann Rheum Dis 2020 01 25;79(1):163-164. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Department of Immunology, SA Pathology (Flinders Medical Centre), Bedford Park, SA, Australia

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-216091DOI Listing
January 2020

A case of rash and arthralgias.

Aust J Gen Pract 2019 09;48(9):609-611

MBBS (Hons), FRACP, Rheumatologist, Perth, WA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31128/AJGP-12-18-4792DOI Listing
September 2019

Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency: Long-term health outcomes and patient perspectives.

J Paediatr Child Health 2017 Aug 17;53(8):766-770. Epub 2017 May 17.

Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Aim: To examine the long-term follow-up and health outcomes of patients who have undergone haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

Methods: Through a structured questionnaire, we examined follow-up arrangements and long-term health outcomes in 22 children who have had a successful HSCT for SCID during the period of 1984-2012 at the Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Results: Most children considered themselves healthy and 'cured' from SCID. Whilst many children enjoy relatively good bio-social health outcomes, specific negative health outcomes and absenteeism from school were perceived negatively. Two-thirds of children see their general practitioner or specialist regularly; however, there did not appear to be consistency with the nature of this follow-up.

Conclusion: The findings from our study highlight the complex bio-psychosocial health needs of post-HSCT SCID children and encourage SCID centres to consider a multidisciplinary approach to their follow-up. Further studies into the determinants of patients' perceptions of their health are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.13560DOI Listing
August 2017

Clinical use and interpretation of serum protein electrophoresis and adjunct assays.

Br J Hosp Med (Lond) 2017 Feb;78(2):C18-C20

Clinical Immunologist and Allergist, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales, Australia and Clinical Associate Professor, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/hmed.2017.78.2.C18DOI Listing
February 2017

Early CCR6 expression on B cells modulates germinal centre kinetics and efficient antibody responses.

Immunol Cell Biol 2017 01 28;95(1):33-41. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

Division of Molecular Immunology, Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.

The CC-chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) can be detected on naive and activated B cells. Counterintuitively, its absence accelerates the appearance of germinal centres (GCs) and increases the production of low-affinity antibodies. The detailed mechanism of CCR6 function during the humoral response has remained elusive, but previously we identified a distinct CCR6 B-cell population in vivo early after antigenic challenge. In this study, we defined this population specifically as early, activated pre-GC B cells. In accordance, we show that CCR6 is upregulated rapidly within hours on the protein or mRNA level after activation in vitro. In addition, only activated B cells migrated specifically towards CCL20, the specific ligand for CCR6. Lack of CCR6 increased the dark zone/light zone ratio of GC and led to decreased antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibody generation in a B-cell intrinsic manner in mixed bone marrow chimeras. In contrast, antigen-specific IgM responses were normal. Hence, CCR6 negatively regulates entry of activated, antigen-specific pre-GC B cells into the GC reaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/icb.2016.68DOI Listing
January 2017

Evaluating for immunodeficiency in children with recurrent infection.

Aust Fam Physician 2014 Sep;43(9):629-32

Adrian YS Lee, BMedSc (Hons), AYMF, LMusA, is a medical student, Tasmanian School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS.

Background: Children have infections more frequently than adults. It may, therefore, be difficult to identify the rare child with immunodeficiency among the many who have recurrent infections but who have a normal immune system.

Objective: The focus of this article will be on differentiating normal children from those with childhood primary immunodeficiency, through thorough clinical evaluation, and outlining some of the more important immunodeficiency diagnoses.

Discussion: When investigating for immunodeficiency, the best available diagnostic tool is a thoughtful clinician with a good working knowledge of what is normal in terms of frequency and severity of childhood infection.
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September 2014

Evaluating for immunodeficiency in children with recurrent infection.

Aust Fam Physician 2014 Sep;43(9):629-32

Adrian YS Lee, BMedSc (Hons), AYMF, LMusA, is a medical student, Tasmanian School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS.

Background: Children have infections more frequently than adults. It may, therefore, be difficult to identify the rare child with immunodeficiency among the many who have recurrent infections but who have a normal immune system.

Objective: The focus of this article will be on differentiating normal children from those with childhood primary immunodeficiency, through thorough clinical evaluation, and outlining some of the more important immunodeficiency diagnoses.

Discussion: When investigating for immunodeficiency, the best available diagnostic tool is a thoughtful clinician with a good working knowledge of what is normal in terms of frequency and severity of childhood infection.
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September 2014

Evaluating for immunodeficiency in children with recurrent infection.

Aust Fam Physician 2014 Sep;43(9):629-32

Adrian YS Lee, BMedSc (Hons), AYMF, LMusA, is a medical student, Tasmanian School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS.

Background: Children have infections more frequently than adults. It may, therefore, be difficult to identify the rare child with immunodeficiency among the many who have recurrent infections but who have a normal immune system.

Objective: The focus of this article will be on differentiating normal children from those with childhood primary immunodeficiency, through thorough clinical evaluation, and outlining some of the more important immunodeficiency diagnoses.

Discussion: When investigating for immunodeficiency, the best available diagnostic tool is a thoughtful clinician with a good working knowledge of what is normal in terms of frequency and severity of childhood infection.
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September 2014

Retention of knowledge and perceived relevance of basic sciences in an integrated case-based learning (CBL) curriculum.

BMC Med Educ 2013 Oct 8;13:139. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.

Background: Knowledge and understanding of basic biomedical sciences remain essential to medical practice, particularly when faced with the continual advancement of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Evidence suggests, however, that retention tends to atrophy across the span of an average medical course and into the early postgraduate years, as preoccupation with clinical medicine predominates. We postulated that perceived relevance demonstrated through applicability to clinical situations may assist in retention of basic science knowledge.

Methods: To test this hypothesis in our own medical student cohort, we administered a paper-based 50 MCQ assessment to a sample of students from Years 2 through 5. Covariates pertaining to demographics, prior educational experience, and the perceived clinical relevance of each question were also collected.

Results: A total of 232 students (Years 2-5, response rate 50%) undertook the assessment task. This sample had comparable demographic and performance characteristics to the whole medical school cohort. In general, discipline-specific and overall scores were better for students in the latter years of the course compared to those in Year 2; male students and domestic students tended to perform better than their respective counterparts in certain disciplines. In the clinical years, perceived clinical relevance was significantly and positively correlated with item performance.

Conclusions: This study suggests that perceived clinical relevance is a contributing factor to the retention of basic science knowledge and behoves curriculum planners to make clinical relevance a more explicit component of applied science teaching throughout the medical course.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-13-139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3851808PMC
October 2013

Complementary and alternative medicine and medical students in Australia:Where do we stand?

Australas Med J 2012 29;5(2):144-9. Epub 2012 Feb 29.

Tasmanian School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.20121183DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413933PMC
August 2012