Publications by authors named "Adriëtte W de Visser"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Long-term immunity after a single yellow fever vaccination in travelers vaccinated at 60 years or older: A 10-year follow-up study.

J Travel Med 2021 Aug 16. Epub 2021 Aug 16.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) revised their position on yellow fever vaccination, in which revaccination every ten years was no longer required, and that a single-dose provided life-long protection. However, research data on the immunogenicity of YF vaccine in people aged 60 years and over are scarce. Indeed, immunosenescence may result in lower virus neutralizing antibody titers after primary vaccination and a more rapid waning immunity. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that older travelers, vaccinated at 60 years or older are more likely to become seronegative in comparison to young adults ten years after primary YF vaccination. Methods This is a ten-year follow-up study of an earlier prospective controlled cohort study. In the original trial the neutralizing antibody response was measured in older travelers (aged 60-81 years, N = 28) and young adults (aged 18-28 years, N = 30) up to 28 days after a primary yellow fever vaccination. Ten years later, we collected serum samples of 22/28 (78%) elderly (71-85 years) and 14/30 (47%) controls (29-40 years), and determined their neutralizing antibody titers by plaque reduction neutralization test. Seropositivity was defined as plaque formation reduction of 80% at a serum dilution of 10 or more (PRNT80 ≥ 10). Results All participants (36/36) were still seropositive ten years after primary vaccination. The geometric mean concentrations were not statistically different between the older and younger participants (6.7 IU/mL vs. 8.6 IU/mL, p = 0.5). Conclusion All older travelers were seropositive, ten years after a primary YF vaccination at the age of ≥60 years. These data suggest that in older travelers a single vaccination is sufficient to convey long-lasting immunity for at least 10 years, and is in support the position of the WHO on a single-dose yellow fever vaccination.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taab126DOI Listing
August 2021

SAAP-148 Eradicates MRSA Persisters Within Mature Biofilm Models Simulating Prosthetic Joint Infection.

Front Microbiol 2021 29;12:625952. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of arthroplasty. Due to biofilm and persister formation current treatment strategies often fail. Therefore, innovative anti-biofilm and anti-persister agents are urgently needed. Antimicrobial peptides with their broad antibacterial activities may be such candidates. An model simulating PJI comprising of rifampicin/ciprofloxacin-exposed, mature methicillin-resistant (MRSA) biofilms on polystyrene plates, titanium/aluminium/niobium disks, and prosthetic joint liners were developed. Bacteria obtained from and residing within these biofilms were exposed to SAAP-148, acyldepsipeptide-4, LL-37, and pexiganan. Microcalorimetry was used to monitor the heat flow by the bacteria in these models. Daily exposure of mature biofilms to rifampicin/ciprofloxacin for 3 days resulted in a 4-log reduction of MRSA. Prolonged antibiotic exposure did not further reduce bacterial counts. Microcalorimetry confirmed the low metabolic activity of these persisters. SAAP-148 and pexiganan, but not LL-37, eliminated the persisters while ADEP4 reduced the number of persisters. SAAP-148 further eradicated persisters within antibiotics-exposed, mature biofilms on the various surfaces. To conclude, antibiotic-exposed, mature MRSA biofilms on various surfaces have been developed as models for PJI. SAAP-148 is highly effective against persisters obtained from the biofilms as well as within these models. Antibiotics-exposed, mature biofilms on relevant surfaces can be instrumental in the search for novel treatment strategies to combat biofilm-associated infections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.625952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7879538PMC
January 2021

Safety and immunogenicity of a primary yellow fever vaccination under low-dose methotrexate therapy-a prospective multi-centre pilot study1.

J Travel Med 2020 Sep;27(6)

Department of Public Health and Global Health/Division of Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: More people on immunosuppression live in or wish to travel to yellow fever virus (YFV)-endemic areas. Data on the safety and immunogenicity of yellow fever vaccination (YFVV) during immunosuppression are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and immunogenicity of a primary YFVV between travellers on methotrexate and controls.

Methods: We conducted a prospective multi-centre controlled observational study from 2015 to 2017 in six Swiss travel clinics. 15 adults (nine with rheumatic diseases, five with dermatologic conditions and one with a gastroenterological disease) on low-dose methotrexate (≤20 mg/week) requiring a primary YFVV and 15 age and sex-matched controls received a YFVV. Solicited/unsolicited adverse reactions were recorded, YFV-RNA was measured in serum samples on Days 3, 7, 10, 14, 28 and neutralizing antibodies on Days 0, 7, 10, 14, 28.

Results: Patients´ and controls' median ages were 53 and 52 years; 9 patients and 10 controls were female. 43% of patients and 33% of controls showed local side effects (P = 0.71); 86% of patients and 66% of controls reported systemic reactions (P = 0.39). YFV-RNA was detected in patients and controls on Day 3-10 post-vaccination and was never of clinical significance. Slightly more patients developed YFV-RNAaemia (Day 3: n = 5 vs n = 2, Day 7: n = 9 vs n = 7, Day 10: n = 3 vs n = 2, all P > 0.39). No serious reactions occurred. On Day 10, a minority of vaccinees was seroprotected (patients: n = 2, controls: n = 6). On Day 28, all vaccinees were seroprotected.

Conclusions: First-time YFVV was safe and immunogenic in travellers on low-dose methotrexate. Larger studies are needed to confirm these promising results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taaa126DOI Listing
September 2020

Long-Term Protection After Fractional-Dose Yellow Fever Vaccination: Follow-up Study of a Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial.

Ann Intern Med 2018 12 27;169(11):761-765. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands (K.V., A.W.D., L.G.V.).

Background: Outbreaks of yellow fever and a frequently depleted vaccine stock increase demand for a dose-sparing strategy. A fractional dose of 17D yellow fever virus (17D-YFV) vaccine has been shown to be noninferior to the standard dose in inducing seroprotection.

Objective: To evaluate whether fractional-dose vaccination can confer long-term immunity.

Design: 10-year follow-up of a subgroup of a randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial. (Dutch Trial Register: NTR7094 [current study] and ISRCTN46326316 [original study]).

Setting: The Netherlands.

Participants: Seventy-five of 155 participants in the original trial provided a blood sample for this study. These 75 participants had received primary vaccination with 17D-YFV vaccine 10 years before. Forty received a 0.1-mL fractional dose intradermally, and 35 received the standard 0.5-mL dose subcutaneously.

Measurements: Virus-neutralizing antibody responses were measured by a plaque reduction neutralization test.

Results: Thirty-nine of 40 (98% [95% CI, 89% to 100%]) participants had protective levels of yellow fever-neutralizing antibodies more than 10 years after receiving a fractional dose of 17D-YFV vaccine compared with 34 of 35 (97% [CI, 87% to 100%]) in the standard-dose group.

Limitation: Only 48% of participants from the original trial participated in this study.

Conclusion: Intradermal administration of a one-fifth dose of yellow fever vaccine induced a protective immune response that lasted for 10 years after vaccination. Persons receiving a fractional dose of yellow fever vaccine do not require a booster vaccination for long-term protection against yellow fever.

Primary Funding Source: Leiden University Medical Center and the International Society of Travel Medicine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/M18-1529DOI Listing
December 2018

Safety and immunogenicity of the novel H4:IC31 tuberculosis vaccine candidate in BCG-vaccinated adults: Two phase I dose escalation trials.

Vaccine 2017 03 17;35(12):1652-1661. Epub 2017 Feb 17.

Center for Infectious Medicine (CIM), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address:

Background: Novel vaccine strategies are required to provide protective immunity in tuberculosis (TB) and prevent development of active disease. We investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a novel TB vaccine candidate, H4:IC31 (AERAS-404) that is composed of a fusion protein of M. tuberculosis antigens Ag85B and TB10.4 combined with an IC31® adjuvant.

Methods: BCG-vaccinated healthy subjects were immunized with various antigen (5, 15, 50, 150μg) and adjuvant (0, 100, 500nmol) doses of the H4:IC31 vaccine (n=106) or placebo (n=18) in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I studies conducted in a low TB endemic setting in Sweden and Finland. The subjects were followed for adverse events and CD4 T cell responses.

Results: H4:IC31 vaccination was well tolerated with a safety profile consisting of mostly mild to moderate self-limited injection site pain, myalgia, arthralgia, fever and post-vaccination inflammatory reaction at the screening tuberculin skin test injection site. The H4:IC31 vaccine elicited antigen-specific CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine production that persisted 18weeks after the last vaccination. CD4 T cell expansion, IFN-γ production and multifunctional CD4 Th1 responses were most prominent after two doses of H4:IC31 containing 5, 15, or 50μg of H4 in combination with the 500nmol IC31 adjuvant dose.

Conclusions: The novel TB vaccine candidate, H4:IC31, demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was immunogenic, capable of triggering multifunctional CD4 T cell responses in previously BCG-vaccinated healthy individuals. These dose-escalation trials provided evidence that the optimal antigen-adjuvant dose combinations are 5, 15, or 50μg of H4 and 500nmol of IC31.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02066428 and NCT02074956.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.01.055DOI Listing
March 2017

A Single 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination Provides Lifelong Immunity; Characterization of Yellow-Fever-Specific Neutralizing Antibody and T-Cell Responses after Vaccination.

PLoS One 2016 15;11(3):e0149871. Epub 2016 Mar 15.

Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Introduction: Prompted by recent amendments of Yellow Fever (YF) vaccination guidelines from boost to single vaccination strategy and the paucity of clinical data to support this adjustment, we used the profile of the YF-specific CD8+ T-cell subset profiles after primary vaccination and neutralizing antibodies as a proxy for potentially longer lasting immunity.

Methods And Findings: PBMCs and serum were collected in six individuals on days 0, 3, 5, 12, 28 and 180, and in 99 individuals >10 years after YF-vaccination. Phenotypic characteristics of YF- tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were determined using class I tetramers. Antibody responses were measured using a standardized plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Also, characteristics of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were compared between individuals who had received a primary- and a booster vaccination. YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells were detectable on day 12 (median tetramer+ cells as percentage of CD8+ T-cells 0.2%, range 0.07-3.1%). On day 180, these cells were still present (median 0.06%, range 0.02-0.78%). The phenotype of YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells shifted from acute phase effector cells on day 12, to late differentiated or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA-/+CD27-) on day 28. Two subsets of YF-tetramer positive T-cells (CD45RA+CD27- and CD45RA+CD27+) persisted until day 180. Within all phenotypic subsets, the T-bet: Eomes ratio tended to be high on day 28 after vaccination and shifted towards predominant Eomes expression on day 180 (median 6.0 (day 28) vs. 2.2 (day 180) p = 0.0625), suggestive of imprinting compatible with long-lived memory properties. YF-tetramer positive CD8+ T-cells were detectable up to 18 years post vaccination, YF-specific antibodies were detectable up to 40 years after single vaccination. Booster vaccination did not increase titers of YF-specific antibodies (mean 12.5 vs. 13.1, p = 0.583), nor induce frequencies or alter phenotypes of YF-tetramer+ CD8+ T-cells.

Conclusion: The presence of a functionally competent YF-specific memory T-cell pool 18 years and sufficient titers of neutralizing antibodies 35-40 years after first vaccination suggest that single vaccination may be sufficient to provide long-term immunity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0149871PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4792480PMC
July 2016

Comparison of the PRNT and an immune fluorescence assay in yellow fever vaccinees receiving immunosuppressive medication.

Vaccine 2016 Mar 1;34(10):1247-51. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: The 17D-yellow fever (YF) vaccination is considered contraindicated in immune-compromised patients; however, accidental vaccination occurs. In this population, measuring the immune response is useful in clinical practice.

Methods: In this study we compare two antibody tests (the Immune Fluorescence Assay and the Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test) in a group of Dutch immune-compromised travellers with a median of 33 days (IQR [28-49]) after primary YF vaccination.

Results: We collected samples of 15 immune-compromised vaccinees vaccinated with the 17D yellow fever vaccine between 2004 and 2012. All samples measured in the plaque reduction neutralization test yielded positive results (>80% virus neutralization with a 1:10 serum dilution). Immune Fluorescence Assay sensitivity was 28% (95% CI [0.12-0.49]). No adverse events were reported.

Conclusions: All immune-compromised patients mounted an adequate response with protective levels of virus neutralizing antibodies to the 17-D YF vaccine. No adverse effects were reported. Compared to the plaque reduction neutralization test, the sensitivity of the Immune Fluorescence Assay test was low. Further research is needed to ascertain that 17D vaccination in immune-compromised patients is safe.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.01.037DOI Listing
March 2016

A novel liposomal adjuvant system, CAF01, promotes long-lived Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T-cell responses in human.

Vaccine 2014 Dec 30;32(52):7098-107. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Statens Serum Institut, Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Artillerivej 5, Copenhagen 2300s, Denmark. Electronic address:

Here, we report on a first-in-man trial where the tuberculosis (TB) vaccine Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1) was adjuvanted with escalating doses of a novel liposome adjuvant CAF01. On their own, protein antigens cannot sufficiently induce immune responses in humans, and require the addition of an adjuvant system to ensure appropriate delivery and concomitant immune activation. To date no approved adjuvants are available for induction of cellular immunity, which seems essential for a number of vaccines, including vaccines against TB. We vaccinated four groups of human volunteers: a non-adjuvanted H1 group, followed by three groups with escalating doses of CAF01-adjuvanted H1 vaccine. All subjects were vaccinated at 0 and 8 weeks and followed up for 150 weeks. Vaccination did not cause local or systemic adverse effects besides transient soreness at the injection site. Two vaccinations elicited strong antigen-specific T-cell responses which persisted after 150 weeks follow-up, indicating the induction of a long-lasting memory response in the vaccine recipients. These results show that CAF01 is a safe and tolerable, Th1-inducing adjuvant for human TB vaccination trials and for vaccination studies in general where cellular immunity is required.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.10.036DOI Listing
December 2014

Pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus: a canary in the cystic fibrosis coalmine.

J Infect 2012 Jun 23;64(6):609-12. Epub 2012 Feb 23.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, The Netherlands.

We present a case of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (PNTM) with M. abscessus. After exclusion of genetic immune disorders known to cause NTM susceptibility, we found compound heterozygosity of two mutations, F508del and R117H in CFTR. The combination of F508del with a hypomorphic CFTR mutation can cause a mild Cystic Fibrosis (CF) phenotype with delayed CF symptoms in adulthood. Although the patient was continuously treated for her lung infection by different physicians for more than twenty years, the diagnosis CF had been missed. The forme fruste of CF should be considered in the analysis of host factors predisposing for PNTM.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2012.02.010DOI Listing
June 2012

Elderly subjects have a delayed antibody response and prolonged viraemia following yellow fever vaccination: a prospective controlled cohort study.

PLoS One 2011 7;6(12):e27753. Epub 2011 Dec 7.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: Yellow fever vaccination (YF-17D) can cause serious adverse events (SAEs). The mechanism of these SAEs is poorly understood. Older age has been identified as a risk factor. We tested the hypothesis that the humoral immune response to yellow fever vaccine develops more slowly in elderly than in younger subjects.

Method: We vaccinated young volunteers (18-28 yrs, N = 30) and elderly travelers (60-81 yrs, N = 28) with YF-17D and measured their neutralizing antibody titers and plasma YF-17D RNA copy numbers before vaccination and 3, 5, 10, 14 and 28 days after vaccination.

Results: Ten days after vaccination seroprotection was attained by 77% (23/30) of the young participants and by 50% (14/28) of the elderly participants (p = 0.03). Accordingly, the Geometric Mean Titer of younger participants was higher than the GMT of the elderly participants. At day 10 the difference was +2.9 IU/ml (95% CI 1.8-4.7, p = 0.00004) and at day 14 +1.8 IU/ml (95% CI 1.1-2.9, p = 0.02, using a mixed linear model. Viraemia was more common in the elderly (86%, 24/28) than in the younger participants (60%, 14/30) (p = 0.03) with higher YF-17D RNA copy numbers in the elderly participants.

Conclusions: We found that elderly subjects had a delayed antibody response and higher viraemia levels after yellow fever primovaccination. We postulate that with older age, a weaker immune response to yellow fever vaccine allows the attenuated virus to cause higher viraemia levels which may increase the risk of developing SAEs. This may be one piece in the puzzle of the pathophysiology of YEL-AVD.

Trial Registration: Trialregitser.nl NTR1040.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0027753PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233541PMC
July 2012

Severe congenital neutropenia in a multigenerational family with a novel neutrophil elastase (ELANE) mutation.

Ann Hematol 2011 Feb 28;90(2):151-8. Epub 2010 Aug 28.

Department of Infectious Diseases, C5-P, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands.

We have analysed a family with nine congenital neutropenia patients in four generations, several of which we have studied in a long-term follow-up of over 25 years. The patients were mild to severe neutropenic and suffered from various recurrent bacterial infections. Mutations in the genes ELANE, CSF3R and GFI1 have been reported in patients with autosomal dominant congenital neutropenias. Using a small-scale linkage analysis with markers around the ELANE, CSF3R, CSF3 and GFI1 genes, we were able to determine that the disease segregated with markers around the ELANE gene. We identified a novel mutation in the ELANE gene in all of the affected family members that was not present in any of the healthy family members. The mutation leads to an A28S missense mutation in the mature protein. None of these patients developed leukaemia. This is the first truly multigenerational family with mutations in ELANE as unambiguous cause of severe congenital neutropenia SCN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-010-1056-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3018258PMC
February 2011

Nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children from the multicenter, randomized, controlled trial in The Netherlands: relevance of polymorphisms in candidate host immunity genes.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2010 Jul;74(7):752-4

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: The annual incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) cervicofacial lymphadenitis in otherwise healthy children is unexpectedly high (8 per million). It mostly arises as localized cervicofacial lymphadenitis. Previous research has suggested environmental risk factors for oral exposure to NTM and a temporal association with eruption of teeth. We studied 22 polymorphisms in relevant candidate genes, some related to periodontitis, in children with NTM lymphadenitis. We also tested for the most common mutation in IFNGR1.

Methods: We analyzed DNA from 81 Dutch children with NTM from a nationwide surveillance study and 215 community controls for 22 polymorphisms in CD209, IL1B, IL8, IL10, IL12B, IL12RB1, IL18, PTX3, TLR4, TNF, VDR and SLC11A1 by MassArray platform (Sequenom) and CONTING. We screened for 818del4 in IFNGR1 by PCR and VspI restriction enzyme cleavage.

Results: We found a positive association between NTM lymphadenitis and +3953TT in IL1B (OR 2.9; 95%-CI: 1.2-7.2). Furthermore, our results showed that -592C/A heterozygosity in IL10 is linked to protection from disease (OR 0.54; 95%-CI: 0.3-0.95), but that other polymorphisms were unrelated to localized NTM disease. However, these associations were not robust to Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. None of the children carried the IFNGR1 818del4 mutation.

Conclusions: Dominance of environmental factors over genetic ones and insufficient sample size might explain the fragility of this study's results. Nevertheless, the association between NTM lymphadenitis and 3953C>T, a polymorphism previously linked to periodontitis, supports our hypothesis that oral exposure to mycobacteria during eruption of teeth plays a role in the etiology of cervical NTM lymphadenitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2010.03.031DOI Listing
July 2010

Distribution of CFTR variations in an Indonesian enteric fever cohort.

Clin Infect Dis 2010 May;50(9):1231-7

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background: Enteric fever is defined by circulating Salmonella serotype Typhi or Paratyphi in the blood. The first step in developing enteric fever is internalization of salmonellae in the gut epithelium. In in vitro experiments, attachment of S. Typhi to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) on the intestinal mucosa is crucial for bacterial uptake. We recently found a microsatellite polymorphism in the CFTR gene, IVS8CA, to be associated with susceptibility to enteric fever in a case-control study in Indonesia.

Methods: To determine which functional variation in CFTR is associated with susceptibility to enteric fever, we sequenced all 27 exons of the CFTR gene in 25 individuals from Indonesia. Polymorphisms that occurred more than once were genotyped in the full enteric fever cohort of 116 case patients and 322 control subjects.

Results: We identified 12 variants in, or adjacent to, the exons: 1 novel variant (L435V), 3 known mutations (N287K, I556V, Q1352H), and 8 known polymorphisms. Variations that occurred more than once were genotyped in the full cohort. The IVS8 TG(11)TG(12) genotype appears to provide some protection from acquiring enteric fever: having this protective genotype or a variation that is known to affect CFTR protein expression provides modest protection from enteric fever (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.87; P<.01).

Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that a correlation exists between variations in the CFTR gene and protection from enteric fever. The IVS8CA polymorphism that was identified previously may, however, be the principal functional variation causing the difference in susceptibility.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/651598DOI Listing
May 2010

Polymorphisms in proinflammatory genes and susceptibility to typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever.

J Interferon Cytokine Res 2007 Apr;27(4):271-9

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Host genetic factors are thought to contribute to susceptibility and outcome in infectious diseases. A polymorphism in a proinflammatory gene, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA - 308), was recently found to be associated with susceptibility to typhoid fever. As the observation was made in hospitalized patients, a potential confounder could be that the TNFA polymorphism is associated with the severity of established illness resulting in hospital admission rather than susceptibility to disease. We tested whether the association with TNFA - 308 is present also in typhoid fever patients enrolled in a community-based case-control study in an endemic area in Indonesia. Common polymorphisms in other proinflammatory genes were assayed as well. Samples of patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever (n = 90) and paratyphoid fever (n = 26) and fever controls (n = 337) were compared with those of community controls (n = 322). In these groups, we analyzed polymorphisms in TNFA by PCR and RFLP, polymorphisms of IFNG, IL1A, IL1B, IL1R1, TNFRSF1A, CASP1, and CRP by Sequenom MassArray (San Diego, CA), and polymorphisms in IL12B and IFNGR1 by fragment length analysis. The IL1R1 polymorphisms were nearly absent in the Indonesian population. The TNFA - 308 polymorphism was not associated with typhoid fever (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.1-1.0) in this population. The polymorphisms at TNFA - 238 or in IFNG, IL1A, IL1B, IL12B, TNFRSF1A, IFNGR1, CASP1, and CRP were also not associated with typhoid or paratyphoid fever. We conclude that polymorphisms in proinflammatory genes do not contribute to susceptibility to typhoid fever and, in view of earlier findings, suggest that the TNFA - 308 polymorphism is likely related to severity of established disease rather than to susceptibility per se.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jir.2006.0129DOI Listing
April 2007

Iron deficiency and NRAMP1 polymorphisms (INT4, D543N and 3'UTR) do not contribute to severity of anaemia in tuberculosis in the Indonesian population.

Br J Nutr 2007 Oct 30;98(4):684-90. Epub 2007 Apr 30.

Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Fe-deficiency anaemia is the most common cause of anaemia in developing countries. In these settings, many chronic infections, including tuberculosis (TB), are highly prevalent. Fe is an essential nutrient for both host and mycobacteria that play a pivotal role in host immunity and mycobacterial growth. A case-control study was performed in a TB-endemic region in Jakarta, Indonesia, among 378 pulmonary TB patients and 436 healthy controls from the same neighbourhood with the same socio-economic status. In a number of these subjects the Fe status could be explored. The distribution of three polymorphisms in the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene (NRAMP1) including INT4, D543N and 3'UTR was examined for a possible association with susceptibility to TB. Anaemia (corrected for sex) was present in 63.2 % of active TB compared with 6.8 % of controls, with female patients more often affected. Anaemia was more pronounced in advanced TB as diagnosed by chest radiography. Lower Hb concentrations in TB patients were accompanied by lower plasma Fe concentrations, lower Fe-binding capacity and higher plasma ferritin. After successful TB therapy, Fe parameters improved towards control values and Hb levels normalised, even without Fe supplementation. NRAMP1 gene polymorphisms were not associated with TB susceptibility, TB severity or anaemia. In conclusion, most active TB patients had anaemia, which was probably due to inflammation and not to Fe deficiency since TB treatment without Fe supplementation was sufficient to restore Hb concentration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114507742691DOI Listing
October 2007

Association of polymorphisms in IL-12/IFN-gamma pathway genes with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in Indonesia.

Tuberculosis (Edinb) 2007 Jul 27;87(4):303-11. Epub 2007 Mar 27.

Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Upon infection with mycobacteria the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis plays an essential role in the activation of cell-mediated immunity required for the elimination of pathogens. Mutations in genes of the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are known to cause extreme susceptibility to infection with environmental mycobacteria, and subtle variations in these genes may influence susceptibility to more virulent mycobacteria. We analyzed the distribution of polymorphisms in four essential genes from the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis, IL12B, IL12RB1, IFNG and IFNGR1, in 382 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 437 healthy controls from an endemic region in Jakarta, Indonesia. The IL12RB1 gene was sequenced in a subset of individuals. Nine known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two new silent variations, 135G>A and 1056C>T, were detected in IL12RB1. Six functional SNPs (-2C>T, 467G>A, 641A>G, 1312C>T, 1573G>A, 1781G>A) in IL12RB1, an IL12B promoter insertion/deletion polymorphism and CA repeats in IFNG and IFNGR1 were analyzed in the cohort. The IFNGR1 allele CA(12) (p=0.004) and genotype CA(12)/CA(12) (p=0.01; OR 0.5) were associated with protection from pulmonary tuberculosis. Interestingly, IL12B promoter heterozygosity was associated with protection from tuberculosis in BCG-vaccinated individuals (p=0.03; OR=0.6). This new finding supports the role that IL-23-of which IL12B encodes a subunit--plays in generation of memory T cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tube.2007.02.001DOI Listing
July 2007

Susceptibility to typhoid fever is associated with a polymorphism in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).

Hum Genet 2005 Oct 28;118(1):138-40. Epub 2005 Oct 28.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands.

The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the affected protein in cystic fibrosis (CF). The high rate of CF carriers has led to speculation that there must be, similar to the sickle cell haemoglobin advantage in malaria, a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Such a selective advantage may be conferred through reduced attachment of Salmonella typhi to intestinal mucosa, thus providing resistance to typhoid fever. We tested this hypothesis by genotyping patients and controls in a typhoid endemic area in Indonesia for two highly polymorphic markers in CFTR and the most common CF mutation. We found an association between genotypes in CFTR and susceptibility to typhoid fever (OR=2.6). These analyses suggest that the role CFTR plays in vitro in S. typhi infection is also important for infection in the human population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-005-0005-0DOI Listing
October 2005
-->