Publications by authors named "Adi-Lukas Kurniawan"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association between Dietary Pattern, Lifestyle, Anthropometric Status, and Anemia-Related Biomarkers among Adults: A Population-Based Study from 2001 to 2015.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 26;18(7). Epub 2021 Mar 26.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

Inadequate dietary intake, poor nutritional status, heavy smoking, and alcohol consumption are associated with the risk of anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between dietary patterns, lifestyle, nutritional status, and anemia-related biomarkers among adults using a multivariable regression model. Taiwanese adults aged 20-45 years ( = 118,924, 43,055 men and 75,869 women) were obtained from the Mei Jau Health Management Institution database, between 2001 and 2015, for data analysis. The anemia-inflammation-related dietary pattern was derived by reduced rank regression analysis. Dietary patterns with high intakes of eggs, meat, organ meats, rice or flour products, fried foods, sugary beverages, and processed foods significantly increased the risk of anemia, and was associated with decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells, but increased white blood cells and C-reactive protein levels. Moreover, current alcohol drinkers, as well as people who were underweight, overweight, obese, and central obese, were more likely to increase their risk of anemia by 46%, 20%, 23%, 34%, and 28%, respectively. Interestingly, participants who are current or past smokers were inversely associated with risk of anemia. In conclusion, adherence to the anemia-inflammation dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of anemia in Taiwanese adults. Furthermore, abnormal weight status and alcohol drinking were correlated with an increased risk of anemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8037593PMC
March 2021

Association between Dietary Patterns and Serum Hepatic Enzyme Levels in Adults with Dyslipidemia and Impaired Fasting Plasma Glucose.

Nutrients 2021 Mar 18;13(3). Epub 2021 Mar 18.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

We investigated the association between dietary patterns and serum hepatic enzyme levels in adults with dyslipidemia and impaired fasting glucose in Taiwan. A total of 15,005 subjects (5452 men and 9553 women) aged 35-69 years were selected. Two major dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis: Western dietary pattern and Mediterranean dietary pattern. Subjects in the highest quartile (Q4) of the Western dietary pattern showed an increased risk of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06-1.45, -trend = 0.01). Fur-thermore, in the highest quartile of the Western dietary pattern, subjects with high waist circum-ference were observed to have a greater risk for developing abnormal serum ALT levels compared to those in the lowest quartile (Q1) (OR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.04-1.97, -trend = 0.01). In the highest quartile of the Western dietary pattern, only women were at an increased risk for having abnormal serum ALT levels (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.59, -trend = 0.03). By contrast, in the highest quartile of the Mediterranean dietary pattern, only men were at a reduced risk for having abnormal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53-0.97, -trend = 0.048). We report a positive association between the Western dietary pattern and abnormal serum ALT levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13030987DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8003213PMC
March 2021

Association of Nutrition Education and Its Interaction with Lifestyle Factors on Kidney Function Parameters and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2021 Jan 21;13(2). Epub 2021 Jan 21.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Xinyi District, Taipei 110, Taiwan.

We evaluated the interactive effects of nutrition education (NE) and lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This cross-sectional cohort study recruited 2176 CKD stages 3-5 patients aged > 20 years from Integrated Chronic Kidney Disease Care Network, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taiwan between December 2008 and April 2019. The multivariable regression analysis was performed to investigate the interactive effects of NE with lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion (AP) were applied to assess additive interaction. Patients who were smoking or physically inactive but received NE had better estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (β: 3.83, 95% CI: 1.17-6.49 or β: 3.67, 95% CI: 2.04-5.29) compared to those without NE. Patients with smoking and NE significantly reduced risks for having high glycated hemoglobin A (HbA) by 47%, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 38%, and high corrected calcium (C-Ca) by 50% compared to those without NE. Moreover, NE and smoking or inactive physical activity exhibited an excess risk of high C-Ca (RERI: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.09-0.85 for smoking or RERI: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.01-0.90 and AP: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.03-0.99 for physical activity). Our study suggests that CKD patients who were enrolled in the NE program had better kidney function. Thus, NE could be associated with slowing kidney function decline and improving cardiovascular risk factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13020298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7909784PMC
January 2021

Association of Testosterone-Related Dietary Pattern with Testicular Function among Adult Men: A Cross-Sectional Health Screening Study in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2021 Jan 18;13(1). Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Research Center for Healthcare Industry Innovation, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 365 Ming-Te Road, Beitou District, Taipei 112, Taiwan.

Diets could play an important role in testicular function, but studies on how adherence to the dietary patterns influences human testicular function in Asian countries are scarce. Herein, we examined the association between testosterone-related dietary patterns and testicular function among adult men in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study recruited 3283 men who attended a private medical screening program from 2009 to 2015. Testosterone-related dietary pattern was generated by the reduced rank regression (RRR) method. The association between adherence to quartile of dietary pattern scores with sex hormones (testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2)) and sperm quality (sperm concentration (SC), total sperm motility (TSM), progressive motility (PRM), and normal sperm morphology (NSM)) were examined by multivariable linear regression. Hemoglobin (β = 0.57, < 0.001), hematocrit (β = 0.17, = 0.002), triglyceride (β = -0.84, < 0.001), HDL-cholesterol (β = 3.58, < 0.001), total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratio (β = -0.78, < 0.001), and uric acid (β = -10.77, < 0.001) were highly correlated with testosterone levels. Therefore, these biomarkers were used to construct a testosterone-related dietary pattern. Highest adherence (Q4) to dietary pattern scores were negatively associated with lower testosterone in the pooled analysis (β = -0.89, = 0.037) and normal-weight men (β = -1.48, = 0.019). Likewise, men in the Q4 of the dietary pattern had lower SC (β = -5.55, = 0.001) and NSM (β = -2.22, = 0.007) regardless of their nutritional status. Our study suggesting that testosterone-related dietary pattern (rich in preserved vegetables or processed meat or fish, deep-fried foods, innards organs, rice or flour products cooked in oil, and dipping sauce, but low in milk, dairy products, legumes, or beans, and dark or leafy vegetables) was associated with a poor testicular function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13010259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7830687PMC
January 2021

Comparing two methods for deriving dietary patterns associated with risk of metabolic syndrome among middle-aged and elderly Taiwanese adults with impaired kidney function.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 10 14;20(1):255. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan.

Background: Dietary patterns were associated with the risk of chronic disease development and outcome-related diseases. In this study, we aimed to compare the correlation between dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome (MetS) using two methods for identifying dietary patterns.

Methods: The participants (n = 25,569) aged ≥40 years with impaired kidney function were retrieved from Mei Jau (MJ) Health Screening database from 2008 to 2010. Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis (PCA) and reduced rank regression (RRR) from twenty-two food groups using PROC FACTOR and PROC PLS functions.

Results: We identified two similar dietary pattern characteristics (high intakes of deep fried foods, preserved or processed foods, dipping sauce, meat, sugary drinks, organ meats, jam/honey, fried rice/flour products, instant noodles and eggs) derived by PCA and RRR. Logistic regression analysis revealed that RRR-derived dietary pattern scores were positively associated with an odds ratio (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.56, 1.86) of having MetS than PCA-derived dietary pattern scores (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.27, 1.51). The correlations between RRR-derived dietary pattern scores and elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (OR = 1.30 for both) or low high density lipoprotein cholesterol in women (OR = 1.32) were statistically significant but not significant in PCA-derived dietary pattern scores.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that RRR gives better results when studying behavior related dietary patterns in association with MetS. RRR may be more preferable to provide dietary information for developing dietary guidelines among people with MetS. Further studies with prospective measurements are needed to verify whether RRR is a useful analytic tool for the association between dietary patterns and other chronic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01142-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7559471PMC
October 2020

Synergistic Effects of Regular Walking and Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Decreasing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress, and Increasing Quality of Life in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: A Community Based Randomized Controlled Trial.

Antioxidants (Basel) 2020 Oct 1;9(10). Epub 2020 Oct 1.

School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

Alkaline electrolyzed water (AEW) and walking are strongly recommended for ameliorating oxidative stress and inflammation. Nevertheless, there is a lack of information on the combination of both on alleviating inflammation, oxidative stress, and improving the quality of life (QoL). We investigated the synergistic effects of drinking AEW and walking on advanced glycation end products (AGEs), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), malondialdehyde (MDA), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and QoL. In total, 81 eligible patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were randomly allocated via single blind to four groups: consumed 2 L/day of AEW ( = 20), instructed to walk for 150 min/week ( = 20), received a combination of AEW and walking ( = 20), and continue their habitual diet and activity ( = 21). Data were collected and analyzed before and after 8 weeks of intervention. Our results showed a significant interaction between the group and time, with both AEW and walking independently and synergistically ameliorating AGEs, AOPPs, MDA, NLR and WBCs levels. Moreover, the AEW group had a higher physical and total QoL score. The walking group and the combined group had higher scores in physical, mental and total QoL compared to the control group. The synergistic effect of AEW and regular walking are an advisable treatment for patients with T2DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox9100946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7599474PMC
October 2020

Inflammatory Dietary Pattern Predicts Dyslipidemia and Anemia in Middle-Aged and Older Taiwanese Adults with Declined Kidney Function: A Cross-Sectional Population Study from 2008 to 2010.

Nutrients 2019 Sep 2;11(9). Epub 2019 Sep 2.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

Dyslipidemia, anemia, and inflammation are associated with declined kidney function. This study investigated the association of inflammatory dietary pattern with dyslipidemia, anemia, and kidney function biomarkers among middle-aged and older Taiwanese adults with declined kidney function. Biochemical data and food frequency questionnaire were obtained from 41,128 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <90 mL/min/1.73 m and positive urinary protein. Inflammatory dietary pattern was identified by reduced rank regression with C-reactive protein (CRP) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (N/L) as response variables. Males had higher prevalence of dyslipidemia and higher inflammatory markers, but lower prevalence of anemia and lower eGFR levels compared to females. Inflammatory dietary pattern characterized with low intakes of seafood, grains, vegetables, and fruits but high intakes of meat, eggs, preserved/processed foods, and sugary drinks was associated with an increased risk of dyslipidemia by 21% in males and an increased risk of anemia by 28-47% in both genders. Furthermore, high consumption of inflammatory dietary pattern was associated with reduced eGFR (males β = -0.85, 95% CI -1.26 to -0.43, females β = -0.53, 95% CI -0.98 to -0.08) and increased N/L and/or CRP in both genders. In conclusion, inflammatory dietary pattern is positively associated with dyslipidemia, anemia, and decreased kidney function in middle-aged and older adults with declined kidney function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11092052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6770658PMC
September 2019

Association of Sleep Duration and Insomnia Symptoms with Components of Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammation in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2019 Aug 9;11(8). Epub 2019 Aug 9.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

The study determined the association of sleep duration and insomnia symptoms with the components of metabolic syndrome and inflammation in middle-aged and older adults with metabolic syndrome in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study used the database compiled in Taiwan between 2004-2013. A total of 26,016 volunteers aged 35 years and above were selected. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. Compared with regular sleep duration (6-8 h/day), short (<6 h/day) or long sleep duration (>8 h/day) and insomnia symptoms significantly increased the odds ratios of high waist circumference, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high triglycerides, high fasting blood glucose, and high C-reactive protein. Insomnia symptoms did not modify the effects of sleep duration on the components of metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Our study suggests that short or long sleep duration and insomnia symptoms may have an adverse effect on metabolic syndrome and inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11081848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723777PMC
August 2019

Dietary patterns in relation to testosterone levels and severity of impaired kidney function among middle-aged and elderly men in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study.

Nutr J 2019 07 27;18(1):42. Epub 2019 Jul 27.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei, 110, Taiwan.

Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), characterized by an impaired kidney function, is associated with low testosterone levels. This study investigated the association between dietary patterns, testosterone levels, and severity of impaired kidney function among middle-aged and elderly men.

Methods: This cross-sectional study used the database from a private health-screening institute in Taiwan between 2008 and 2010. Men aged 40 years old and older (n = 21,376) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 90 mL/min/1.73 m and proteinuria were selected. Among 21,376 men, 256 men had available measurements of testosterone levels. Dietary assessment was conducted using a food frequency questionnaire and three dietary patterns (fried-processed, vege-seafood, and dairy-grain dietary patterns) were identified using principal component analysis.

Results: Men in the lower tertiles (T1 and T2) of eGFR had significantly decreased testosterone levels by 0.8 (95% CI: - 1.40, - 0.20) and 0.9 nmol/L (95% CI: - 1.43, - 0.33). Furthermore, serum triglycerides (TG) levels were inversely associated with testosterone levels (β = - 0.51, 95% CI: - 0.77, - 0.24). Men in the higher tertile of fried-processed dietary pattern scores were associated with decreased testosterone levels by 0.8 nmol/L (95% CI: - 1.40, - 0.16), reduced testosterone-to-TG (T/TG) ratio by 1.8 units (95% CI: - 2.99, - 0.53), and increased risk of moderate/severe impaired kidney function (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m) and proteinuria severity by 1.35 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.58) and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.37) times respectively. In contrast, the vege-seafood dietary pattern was negatively associated with severity of impaired kidney function and proteinuria after multivariable adjustment, but had no association with testosterone levels and T/TG ratio.

Conclusions: The fried-processed dietary pattern is negatively associated with testosterone levels but positively associated with the severity of impaired kidney function. However, the vege-seafood and dairy-grain dietary patterns appear to have beneficial effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12937-019-0467-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6660671PMC
July 2019

Alteration in iron efflux affects male sex hormone testosterone biosynthesis in a diet-induced obese rat model.

Food Funct 2019 Jul;10(7):4113-4123

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. and Graduate Institute of Metabolism and Obesity Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan and Nutrition Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan and Chinese Taipei Society for the Study of Obesity, CTSSO, Taipei, Taiwan.

This study was motivated by clinical observations that dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS) and an androgen deficiency are common features observed in obese adult men; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of DIOS on androgen deficiency remains to be elucidated. We established a DIOS animal model by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an iron/fat-enriched diet (50% fat plus 0.25, 1, or 2 g ferric iron per kg diet) for 12 weeks to induce iron dysfunction (indicated by decreased tissue iron efflux) in obese rats. Obese rats fed an iron/fat-enriched diet showed decreased levels of testicular total Testosterone (T) and iron exporter ferroportin but increased levels of testicular iron and hepcidin, and these effects were more evident with a >1 g ferric iron per kg diet. A western blot analysis showed that an iron/fat-enriched diet triggered testicular endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress but decreased mitochondrion biogenesis proteins (PGC1α and TFAM) and T-converting proteins (StAR, CYP11A, and 17β-HSD). TUNEL staining showed that >1 g ferric iron induced apoptosis mainly in germ cells and Leydig's cells. Uncontrolled testicular iron efflux may cause mitochondrial-ER dysfunction and affect T biosynthesis. Future study targeting the testicular hepcidin-ferroportin axis may offer a therapeutic tool to alleviate testicular iron retention and mitochondrial-ER stress in Leydig's cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8fo01870gDOI Listing
July 2019

Dietary Patterns in Relation to Components of Dyslipidemia and Fasting Plasma Glucose in Adults with Dyslipidemia and Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2019 Apr 14;11(4). Epub 2019 Apr 14.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

Dietary patterns have been proposed to be related to dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. This study investigated the correlation of dietary patterns with components of dyslipidemia and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) among young and middle-aged adults (aged between 20 and 50 years) with dyslipidemia and abnormal FPG in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study used the database compiled in Taiwan between 2001 to 2010. A total of 13,609 subjects aged between 20 and 50 years were selected. Dyslipidemia was defined primarily according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines with minor modification. Elevated FPG level was defined according to the American Diabetes Association. The factor analysis was conducted to identify three dietary patterns. Higher scores of the meat-convenience dietary pattern (high intake of deep-fried and processed food, sauces, sugar-added beverages, meat and organ meats, instant noodles, rice or flour cooked in oil, and eggs) had no association with components of dyslipidemia and abnormal FPG. Higher scores of the vegetables-fruits-seafood dietary pattern (high intake of vegetables, vegetables with oil or dressing, fruits, seafood, legumes, soy products, and rice or flour products) was inversely associated with hypercholesterolemia and positively associated with hyperglycemia. Higher scores of the dairy-complex carbohydrate dietary pattern (high intake of dairy products, milk, root crops, jam or honey, and whole grains) was inversely correlated with hypertriglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Our results support that the dietary pattern may have a role in the prevention and management of dyslipidemia and abnormal fasting plasma glucose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu11040845DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6520691PMC
April 2019

Association of kidney function-related dietary pattern, weight status, and cardiovascular risk factors with severity of impaired kidney function in middle-aged and older adults with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional population study.

Nutr J 2019 04 22;18(1):27. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei, 110, Taiwan.

Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), characterized by impaired kidney function, affects over 1.5 million individuals in Taiwan. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is commonly found in patients with CKD, and the increased prevalence of obesity can have some implications for the risk of both CKD and CVD. Since diet plays an important role in the development of obesity, CVD and CKD, our study was designed to investigate the association of kidney function-related dietary pattern with weight status, cardiovascular risk factors, and the severity of impaired kidney function in middle-aged and older adults in Taiwan.

Methods: A total of 41,128 participants aged 40 to 95 years old with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m and proteinuria were recruited from Mei Jau Health Institute between 2008 and 2010. The kidney function-related dietary pattern was identified using reduced rank regression (RRR) and was known as high consumption of preserved or processed food, meat, organ meats, rice/flour products, and, low consumption of fruit, dark-colored vegetables, bread, and beans. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify the association of weight status and cardiovascular risk factors with moderately/severely impaired kidney function (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m) and the association of dietary pattern with the outcomes aforementioned.

Results: Moderately/severely impaired kidney function participants were heavier and had higher abnormality of cardiovascular risk factors compared with those with mildly impaired kidney function. Weight status (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.12-1.45, P <  0.001 for obesity) and cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.31-1.77, P <  0.001 for high total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72, P <  0.001 for hypercalcemia) were positively associated with increased risk of moderately/severely impaired kidney function. The kidney function-related dietary pattern was correlated with overweight or obese (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.89-2.27, P <  0.01) weight status, increased cardiovascular risk by 10-31%, and the risk of moderately/severely impaired kidney function (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.29, P <  0.05).

Conclusions: The RRR-derived kidney function-related dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of processed and animal foods and low intake of plant foods, predicts the risks for developing cardiovascular disease and moderately/severely impaired kidney function among middle-aged and older adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12937-019-0452-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6477746PMC
April 2019