Publications by authors named "Adeolu Banjoko"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The role of suprapubic catheter insertion in preventing urinary tract infections following intravesical Botulinum toxin A.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2021 Sep 17;264:384-385. Epub 2021 Jul 17.

Department of Urogynaecology, Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2021.07.019DOI Listing
September 2021

Congenitally Malformed Hearts: Aspects of Teaching and Research Involving Medical Students.

J Cardiovasc Dev Dis 2021 Mar 28;8(4). Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Department of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, Birmingham Women's and Children's Hospital, Birmingham B4 6NH, UK.

To appreciate congenital heart disease fully, a detailed understanding of the anatomical presentation, as well as the physiology, is required. This is often introduced at an advanced stage of training. Professor Anderson has been influential in the Clinical Anatomy Intercalated BSc programme at the University of Birmingham, in particular in his teaching on Sequential Segmental Analysis. This article describes the experiences of the latest cohort of students on this programme, who undertook varying research projects using the Birmingham Cardiac Archive, with the guidance of Professor Anderson. The projects outlined include various aspects of isomerism, encompassing both the cardiac and abdominal manifestations, as well as details of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and prenatally diagnosed right aortic arch and double arch. These studies all aimed to increase the knowledge base of their respective cardiac malformations and provide a basis for further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcdd8040034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8065960PMC
March 2021

Tetralogy of Fallot: stent palliation or neonatal repair?

Cardiol Young 2021 Mar 8:1-9. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Alder Hey Children Hospital, Liverpool, UK.

Surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot has excellent outcomes, with over 90% of patients alive at 30 years. The ideal time for surgical repair is between 3 and 11 months of age. However, the symptomatic neonate with Tetralogy of Fallot may require earlier intervention: either a palliative intervention (right ventricular outflow tract stent, ductal stent, balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty, or Blalock-Taussig shunt) followed by a surgical repair later on, or a complete surgical repair in the neonatal period. Indications for palliation include prematurity, complex anatomy, small pulmonary artery size, and comorbidities. Given that outcomes after right ventricular outflow tract stent palliation are particularly promising - there is low mortality and morbidity, and consistently increased oxygen saturations and increased pulmonary artery z-scores - it is now considered the first-line palliative option. Disadvantages of right ventricular outflow tract stenting include increased cardiopulmonary bypass time at later repair and the stent preventing pulmonary valve preservation. However, neonatal surgical repair is associated with increased short-term complications and hospital length of stay compared to staged repair. Both staged repair and primary repair appear to have similar long-term mortality and morbidity, but more evidence is needed assessing long-term outcomes for right ventricular outflow tract stent palliation patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951121000846DOI Listing
March 2021

Perioperative and long-term management of Fontan patients.

Cardiol Young 2021 May 12;31(5):775-785. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool, UK.

A Fontan circulation requires a series of three-staged operations aimed to palliate patients with single-ventricle CHD. Currently, the most frequent technique is the extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection, an external conduit connecting the IVC and right pulmonary artery, bypassing the right side of the heart. Fontan candidates must meet strict criteria; they are assessed utilising both cardiac catheterisation and cardiac magnetic resonance. Postoperatively, treatment protocols prioritise antibiotic prophylaxis, diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, anticoagulation, and oxygen therapy with fluid restriction and a low-fat diet. These measures aim to reduce length of stay in the ICU and hospital by preventing acute complications such as infection, venous thromboembolism, low cardiac output, pleural effusion, and acute kidney injury. Late complications of a Fontan procedure include circulation failure, protein-losing enteropathy, plastic bronchitis, and Fontan-associated liver disease. The definitive management is cardiac transplantation, with promising innovations in selective embolisation of lymphatic vessels and Fontan-specific ventricular assist devices. Further research assessing current protocols in the perioperative management of Fontan patients would be beneficial for standardising current practice and improving outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951120004618DOI Listing
May 2021

An Instagram initiative for medical school applicants.

BMJ 2020 08 17;370:m2887. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Medical School, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2887DOI Listing
August 2020

Antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections: A re-visit after five years and experience over two sites.

Post Reprod Health 2020 Jun 6;26(2):91-100. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Urogynaecology, Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK.

Objective: The aim of this study was to repeat a previous audit, performed from 2009 to 2013, for the cohort of 2018 to determine how the resistance rates in urinary pathogens in women over 18 years of age have changed. A secondary aim of the study was to use resistance data from a different UK hospital in the same year to compare differences in resistance rates across different geographic locations.

Study Design: This was a retrospective study of all positive urine cultures grown from female patients attending two different hospitals in the year 2018. Resistance patterns were analysed.

Results: The resistance rate to co-amoxiclav continues to increase with amoxicillin retaining high resistance patterns. There are some significant differences in resistance patterns between the different locations.

Conclusion: Antimicrobial resistance is a significant problem in the UK particularly in antibiotics used to treat UTI. These patterns can vary across different geographical locations and over time; therefore, up-to-date knowledge of local anti-biotic resistance is essential when making an appropriate prescription choice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2053369120910039DOI Listing
June 2020
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