Publications by authors named "Adawiyah Suriza Shuib"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hot water extract of Pleurotus pulmonarius stalk waste enhances innate immune response and immune-related gene expression in red hybrid tilapia Oreochromis sp. following challenge with pathogen-associated molecular patterns.

Fish Shellfish Immunol 2021 Jun 19;116:61-73. Epub 2021 Jun 19.

Aquatic Animal Health and Therapeutics Laboratory, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

In aquaculture, commercial fish such as red hybrid tilapia are usually raised at high density to boost the production within a short period of time. This overcrowded environment, however, may cause stress to the cultured fish and increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. Antibiotics and chemotherapeutics are used by fish farmers to overcome these challenges, but this may increase the production cost. Studies have reported on the potential of mushroom polysaccharides that can act as immunostimulants to enhance the immune response and disease resistance in fish. In the current study, hot water extract (HWE) from mushroom stalk waste (MSW) was used to formulate fish feed and hence administered to red hybrid tilapia to observe the activation of immune system. Upon 30 days of feeding, the fish were challenged with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly (I:C)) to mimic bacterial and viral infection, respectively. HWE supplementation promoted better feed utilisation in red hybrid tilapia although it did not increase the body weight gain and specific growth rate compared to the control diet. The innate immunological parameters such as phagocytic activity and respiratory burst activity were significantly higher in HWE-supplemented group than that of the control group following PAMPs challenges. HWE-supplemented diet also resulted in higher mRNA transcription of il1b and tnfa in midgut, spleen and head kidney at 1-day post PAMPs injection. Tlr3 exhibited the highest upregulation in the HWE fed fish injected with poly (I:C). At 3-days post PAMPs injection, both ighm and tcrb expression were upregulated significantly in the spleen and head kidney. Results showed that HWE supplementation enhances the immune responses of red hybrid tilapia and induced a higher serum bactericidal activity against S. agalactiae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsi.2021.06.005DOI Listing
June 2021

STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS AND ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECTS OF ANGIOTENSIN-I-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORY PEPTIDES IN THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN AND KALLIKREIN KININ SYSTEMS.

Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med 2017 13;14(2):383-406. Epub 2017 Jan 13.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur.

Background: The commercially available synthetic angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are known to exert negative side effects which have driven many research groups globally to discover the novel ACE inhibitors.

Method: Literature search was performed within the PubMed, ScienceDirect.com and Google Scholar.

Results: The presence of proline at the C-terminal tripeptide of ACE inhibitor can competitively inhibit the ACE activity. The effects of other amino acids are less studied leading to difficulties in predicting potent peptide sequences. The broad specificity of the enzyme may be due to the dual active sites observed on the somatic ACE. The inhibitors may not necessarily competitively inhibit the enzyme which explains why some reported inhibitors do not have the common ACE inhibitor characteristics. Finally, the assay has to be carried out before the peptides as the antihypertensive agents can be claimed. The peptides must be absorbed into circulation without being degraded, which will affect their bioavailability and potency. Thus, peptides with strong IC50 values do not necessarily have the same effect and vice versa.

Conclusion: The relationship between peptide amino acid sequence and inhibitory activity, studies of the active peptides and bioavailability must be studied before the peptides as antihypertensive agents can be claimed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21010/ajtcam.v14i2.39DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446464PMC
August 2017

Tumor suppression effect of Solanum nigrum polysaccharide fraction on Breast cancer via immunomodulation.

Int J Biol Macromol 2016 Nov 27;92:185-193. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; University of Malaya Centre for Proteomics Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address:

A polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum, SN-ppF3 was shown previously to have an immunomodulatory activity where it could possibly be used to enhance the host immune response in fighting cancer. The non-toxic SN-ppF3 was fed orally to breast tumor bearing-mice with concentrations of 250 and 500mg/kg for 10days. During the treatment period, size of the tumor and weight of the mice were monitored. At the end of the treatment, blood, tumor, spleen and thymus were harvested for physiological and immunological analyses. After the treatment, the tumor volume and tumor weight were significantly inhibited by 65% and 40%, respectively. Based on the histological observation, the treatment of SN-ppF3 resulted in the disruption of tumor cells morphology. The increase in infiltrating T cells, NK cells and macrophages were observed in tumor tissues of the treated mice, which partly explained the higher apoptosis tumor cells observed in the treated mice. Moreover, the level of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 were elevated, while the level of IL-6 was decreased significantly, in serum of the treated mice. These results suggested that tumor suppression mechanisms observed in SN-ppF3-treated mice were most probably due through enhancing the host immune response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.06.079DOI Listing
November 2016

Application of SELDI-TOF in N-glycopeptides profiling of the urine from patients with endometrial, ovarian and cervical cancer.

Arch Physiol Biochem 2016 Jul 16;122(3):111-6. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

a Department of Cell and Molecular Biology , University Putra Malaysia , Serdang , Selangor , Malaysia .

Purpose: Endometrial (ECa), ovarian (OCa) and cervical (CCa) cancers are among 10 of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide. Cancers are known to cause some proteins to be differentially glycosylated or aberrantly excreted in the urine, which can be used as biomarkers. Since ECa, OCa and CCa are difficult to diagnose at the early stage, the aim of the present study was to identify a panel of new biomarkers for early detection of the cancers using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) technology. Identification of early biomarkers that are specific and efficient can increase the survival rate of the patients.

Experimental Design: Digested urinary proteins from patients with ECa, OCa and CCa were incubated on the champedak mannose-binding (CMB) lectin-immobilized PS10 chip. The lectin-captured glycopeptides were detected with SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry and followed by biomarker wizard analysis.

Results: Peaks m/z 1201 and 1449 were detected as potential group discriminators. The peak m/z 1201 could distinguish OCa from CCa and ECa and its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. For m/z 1449, it was able to differentiate ECa from the other two types of cancer.

Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest urinary glycopeptides m/z 1201 and 1449 may serve as potential biomarkers for the early detection of ECa, OCa and CCa, although this requires further extensive validation on clinically representative populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13813455.2016.1151441DOI Listing
July 2016

Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding lectin under different urea concentrations.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2016 Jan 29;98:57-63. Epub 2015 Nov 29.

Biomolecular Research Group, Biochemistry Programme, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address:

Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding (CGB) lectin under different urea concentrations was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD), tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence and ANS fluorescence. In all cases, CGB lectin displayed a two-step, three-state transition. The first transition (from the native state to the intermediate state) started at ∼2.0 M urea and ended at ∼4.5 M urea, while the second transition (from the intermediate state to the completely denatured state) was characterized by the start- and end-points at ∼5.75 M and ∼7.5 M urea, respectively, when analyzed by the emission maximum of Trp fluorescence. A marked increase in the Trp fluorescence, ANS fluorescence and -CD values at 218 nm (-CD218 nm) represented the first transition, whereas a decrease in these parameters defined the second transition. On the other hand, emission maximum of the Trp fluorescence showed a continuous increase throughout the urea concentration range. Transformation of tetramer into monomer represented the first transition, whereas the second transition reflected the unfolding of monomer. Far-UV CD, Trp fluorescence and ANS fluorescence spectra were used to characterize the native, the intermediate and the completely denatured states of CGB lectin, obtained at 0.0 M, 5.0 M and 9.0 M urea, respectively. The intermediate state was characterized by the presence of higher secondary structures, increased ANS binding as well as increased Trp fluorescence intensity. A gradual decrease in the hemagglutination activity of CGB lectin was observed with increasing urea concentrations, showing complete loss at 4.0 M urea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2015.11.007DOI Listing
January 2016

Identification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins from mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius (oyster mushroom).

Planta Med 2015 Jan 15;81(2):123-9. Epub 2015 Jan 15.

University of Malaya Centre for Proteomics Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Pleurotus pulmonarius (grey oyster mushroom) has been acknowledged as a recuperative agent for many diseases in addition to its recognition as a nutritious provision. We performed a study on P. pulmonarius mycelium for an antihypertensive effect via the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity. The preliminary assay on the mycelial water extract demonstrated that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity had an IC50 value of 720 µg/mL. Further protein purifications via ammonium sulphate precipitation and RP-HPLC resulted in 60× stronger angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity than that of the mycelial water extract (IC50 = 12 µg/mL). Protein identification and characterisation by MALDI-TOF/TOF, later corroborated by LC-MS/MS, indicated three proteins that are responsible for the blood pressure lowering effects via different mechanisms: serine proteinase inhibitor-like protein, nitrite reductase-like protein, and DEAD/DEAH box RNA helicase-like protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1383409DOI Listing
January 2015

Stimulatory effects of polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells.

PLoS One 2014 9;9(10):e108988. Epub 2014 Oct 9.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; University of Malaya Centre for Proteomics Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0108988PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4191994PMC
June 2015

Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus (J.E. Lange) Imbach identified by LC-MS/MS.

Food Chem 2014 Apr 24;148:396-401. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

Mushroom Research Centre, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors derived from foods are valuable auxiliaries to agents such as captopril. Eight highly functional ACE inhibitory peptides from the mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, were identified by LC-MS/MS. Among these peptides, the most potent ACE inhibitory activity was exhibited by AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK with IC₅₀ values of 63, 116 and 129 μM, respectively. These peptides exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity after gastrointestinal digestion. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that AHEPVK and RIGLF act as competitive inhibitors against ACE, whereas PSSNK acts as a non-competitive inhibitor. Mushrooms can be a good component of dietary supplement due to their readily available source and, in addition, they rarely cause food allergy. Compared to ACE inhibitory peptides isolated from other edible mushrooms, AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK have lower IC₅₀ values. Therefore, these peptides may serve as an ideal ingredient in the production of antihypertensive supplements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.10.053DOI Listing
April 2014

Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus O.K. Miller identified by LC-MS/MS.

BMC Complement Altern Med 2013 Nov 11;13:313. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

Mushroom Research Centre, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia.

Background: Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to reduce mortality in patients with hypertension. Compared to chemosynthetic drugs, ACE inhibitors derived from natural sources such as food proteins are believed to be safer for consumption and to have fewer adverse effects. Some edible mushrooms have been reported to significantly reduce blood pressure after oral administration. In addition, mushrooms are known to be rich in protein content. This makes them a potential source of ACE inhibitory peptides. Hence, the objective of the current study was to isolate and characterise ACE inhibitory peptides from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus.

Methods: ACE inhibitory proteins were isolated from P. cystidiosus based on the bioassay guided purification steps, i.e. ammonium sulphate precipitation, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Active fraction was then analysed by LC-MS/MS and potential ACE inhibitory peptides identified were chemically synthesized. Effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestions on the ACE inhibitory activity of the peptides and their inhibition patterns were evaluated.

Results: Two potential ACE inhibitory peptides, AHEPVK and GPSMR were identified from P. cystidiosus with molecular masses of 679.53 and 546.36 Da, respectively. Both peptides exhibited potentially high ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 62.8 and 277.5 μM, respectively. SEC chromatograms and BIOPEP analysis of these peptides revealed that the peptide sequence of the hexapeptide, AHEPVK, was stable throughout gastrointestinal digestion. The pentapeptide, GPSMR, was hydrolysed after digestion and it was predicted to release a dipeptide ACE inhibitor, GP, from its precursor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot of AHEPVK showed that this potent and stable ACE inhibitor has a competitive inhibitory effect against ACE.

Conclusion: The present study indicated that the peptides from P. cystidiosus could be potential ACE inhibitors. Although these peptides had lower ACE inhibitory activity compared to commercial antihypertensive drugs, they are derived from mushroom which could be easily obtained and should have no side effects. Further in vivo studies can be carried out to reveal the clear mechanism of ACE inhibition by these peptides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-13-313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3827828PMC
November 2013

Identification of O-glycosylated proteins that are aberrantly excreted in the urine of patients with early stage ovarian cancer.

Int J Mol Sci 2013 Apr 11;14(4):7923-31. Epub 2013 Apr 11.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia.

Cancer is known to induce or alter the O-glycosylation of selective proteins that may eventually be excreted in the patients' urine. The present study was performed to identify O-glycosylated proteins that are aberrantly excreted in the urine of patients with early stage ovarian cancer (OCa). These urinary glycoproteins are potential biomarkers for early detection of OCa. In this study, urinary proteins of patients with early stage OCa and age-matched OCa negative women were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detection using a lectin that binds to the O-glycosylated proteins. Our analysis demonstrated significant enhanced expression of clusterin and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, but lower levels of kininogen in the urine of the OCa patients compared to the controls. The different altered levels of these urinary glycoproteins were further confirmed using competitive ELISA. Our data are suggestive of the potential use of the aberrantly excreted urinary O-glycosylated proteins as biomarkers for the early detection of OCa, although this requires further validation in a large clinically representative population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms14047923DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3645724PMC
April 2013

Proteomic analysis of antihypertensive proteins in edible mushrooms.

J Agric Food Chem 2012 Dec 11;60(50):12341-8. Epub 2012 Dec 11.

Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Mushrooms are high in protein content, which makes them potentially a good source of antihypertensive peptides. Among the mushrooms tested, protein extracts from Pleurotus cystidiosus (E1Pc and E5Pc) and Agaricus bisporus (E1Ab and E3Ab) had high levels of antihypertensive activity. The protein extracts were fractionated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RPHPLC) into six fractions. Fraction 3 from E5Pc (E5PcF3) and fraction 6 from E3Ab (E3AbF6) had the highest antihypertensive activities. SDS-PAGE analysis showed E5PcF3 consisted mainly of low molecular weight proteins, whereas E3AbF6 contained a variety of high to low molecular weight proteins. There were 22 protein clusters detected by SELDI-TOF-MS analysis with five common peaks found in E5PcF3 and E3AbF6, which had m/z values in the range of 3940-11413. This study suggests that the antihypertensive activity in the two mushroom species could be due to proteins with molecular masses ranging from 3 to 10 kDa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf3042159DOI Listing
December 2012

Detection of differential levels of proteins in the urine of patients with endometrial cancer: analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and o-glycan binding lectin.

Int J Mol Sci 2012 27;13(8):9489-501. Epub 2012 Jul 27.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia; E-Mail:

Cancers can cause some proteins to be aberrantly excreted or released in the urine, which can be used as biomarkers. To screen for potential biomarkers for endometrial cancer (ECa), the urinary proteins from patients who were newly diagnosed with early stage ECa and untreated controls were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and followed by image analysis. The altered levels of zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and CD59 were detected in the patients compared to the controls. In addition, the urine of the ECa patients was also found to contain relatively lower levels of a fragment of nebulin when the 2-DE separated urinary proteins were probed using champedak galactose binding (CGB) lectin. The different levels of the nebulin fragment were further validated by subjecting the urinary protein samples to CGB lectin affinity chromatography and analysis of the bound fractions by LC-MS/MS. Our data is suggestive of the potential use of the differentially expressed urinary proteins as biomarkers for ECa although this requires further extensive validation on clinically representative populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms13089489DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431808PMC
August 2015

Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2012 18;2012:464238. Epub 2011 Jun 18.

Mushroom Research Centre, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC(50) = 50 μg/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/464238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3118607PMC
July 2011