Publications by authors named "Adama Hilou"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ethnobotanical and Phytochemical Profiling of Medicinal Plants from Burkina Faso Used to Increase Physical Performance.

Medicines (Basel) 2022 Jan 28;9(2). Epub 2022 Jan 28.

Laboratory of Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Food Technology and Nutrition (LABIOTAN), Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou 09 BP 848, Burkina Faso.

Some ergogenic medicinal plants are used in exercise and sport in Africa in order to increase sport performance. However, data on their composition and their possible impacts on health are limited. This study was initiated to provide ethnobotanical data on plants traditionally used to optimize physical performance and to perform a qualitative characterization of their main chemical groups. Ethnobotanical surveys in two communes (Dedougou and Nouna), of the region of , Burkina Faso and phytochemical analyses of the most interesting plants were conducted. A total of 50 respondents including traditional hunters , farmers, healers, herbalists, marabouts, etc., were interviewed. Fifty-two species used in the optimization of exercise and sports have been identified. The most cited species were , , , , , and . These plants are known to prevent muscle and skeletal disorders, aches and pains, and mental disorders. The study identified several types of plants including those displaying stimulation, anxiolytic, sedative, adaptogenic, or erythropoietic activities. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, alkaloids, terpenes, and steroids, which are similar molecules families of those of doping molecules. Additionally, TLC screening allowed the characterization of numerous terpene and flavonoid compounds including rutin. The possible structural similarity of the characterized chemical groups of these species with those of doping families raise concerns about the consequences of their consumption. However, the identification of the active molecules of these species remains to be performed in order to predict the real risks associated with their consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines9020010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8878663PMC
January 2022

Toxicity and bacterial anti-motility activities of the hydroethanolic extract of Acacia senegal (L.) Willd (Fabaceae) leaves.

BMC Complement Med Ther 2021 Jun 29;21(1):178. Epub 2021 Jun 29.

UMR_MD1, U-1261, INSERM, SSA, IRBA, MCT, Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Aix-Marseille, 13385, Marseille, France.

Background: Acacia senegal is a plant traditionally used for its various properties, including the treatment of infectious diseases. Recently, our team has demonstrated the ability of the hydroethanolic extract of the leaves to increase the activity of phenicol antibiotics against multi-resistant bacteria. The aim of this work is to determine the toxicological effects of the extract and its capacity to inhibit the bacterial mobility of Gram-negative bacteria, in order to evaluate the level of safety use of this plant.

Methods: The cytotoxicity test was performed using the neutral red absorption method. Acute and sub-acute oral toxicity were conducted on NMRI mice and Wistar rats. The behaviour and adverse effects were recorded during the 14 days of the acute study. For the subacute test, biochemical parameters, food and water consumption, and morphological parameters were determined. The anti-motility activities were evaluated on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 and Escherichia coli AG100, using specific concentrations of Agar as required by the method.

Results: HEASG induced inhibition of keratinocytes cell growth with an IC of 1302 ± 60 μg/mL. For the acute toxicity study in mice, the single dose of extract of 2000 mg/kg body weight caused no deaths and no behavioural changes were observed; therefore, the median lethal dose (LD) of HEASG was calculated to 5000 mg/kg body weight. In Wistar rats, no mortality was observed at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day during the 28-day subacute oral toxicity study. The weights of both females and males increased globally over time, regardless of the batch. No statistically significant differences were registered for organ weights and biochemical parameters, except for chloride for biochemical parameters. Water and food consumption did not change significantly. Furthermore, no macroscopic changes in organ appearance were observed. Regarding anti-motility activity, the extract has reduced the swarming motility of PA01 and AG100 significantly at the concentration of 32 μg/mL (P < 0.001). The extract has reduced the swimming motility (P < 0.01) of PA01 but not AG100.

Conclusions: The results suggest that hydroethanolic extract of A. senegal leaves has significant activity against bacterial motility and relatively low toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12906-021-03348-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8243867PMC
June 2021

Extract Rejuvenates the Activity of Phenicols on Selected Multi Drug Resistant Strains.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 Jun 13;9(6). Epub 2020 Jun 13.

UMR_MD1, U-1261, Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, SSA, IRBA, MCT, Faculté de Pharmacie, 13385 Marseille, France.

This study reported the phytochemical composition of two hydroethanolic extracts of and trees from Burkina Faso and their activities, alone or in combination with selected antibiotics, against multidrug resistant bacteria. High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method was used for phytochemical screening. Total phenolic and total flavonoid ant tannins in leaves extracts contents were assessed by spectrophotometric method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of plant extracts and antibiotics were determined using the microdilution method and iodonitrotetrazolium chloride. Combinations of extracts and antibiotics were studied using checkerboard assays. Screening revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and tannins in the hydroethanolic extract (HE) of the leaves. The HE of showed the highest total phenolic (571.30 ± 6.97 mg GAE/g), total flavonoids (140.41 ± 4.01 mg RTE/g), and tannins (24.72 ± 0.14%, condensed; 35.77 ± 0.19%, hydrolysable tannins). However, the HE of showed the lowest total phenolic (69.84 ± 3.54 mg GAE/g), total flavonoids (27.32 ± 0.57 mg RTE/g), and tannins (14.60 ± 0.01%, condensed; 3.09 ± 0.02%, hydrolysable). The MICs for HE and antibiotics were in the range of 2-512 and 0.008-1024 mg/L, respectively. All tested HE presented an MIC greater than 512 mg/L except HE of . The lowest MIC value (128 mg/L) was obtained with HE of against EA298 and AG100A. Interesting restoring effects on chloramphenicol and florphenicol activity were detected with alcoholic extracts of against resistant and strains that overproduce AcrAB or FloR pumps. The adjuvant effect of HE of suggests that the crude extract of leaves could be a potential source of molecules for improving the susceptibility of bacteria to phenicols antibiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9060323DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7344600PMC
June 2020

Plasmodium stage-selective antimalarials from Lophira lanceolata stem bark.

Phytochemistry 2020 Jun 16;174:112336. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Via D. Montesano 49, 80131, Naples, Italy; Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca Sulla Malaria / Italian Malaria Network, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Targeting the transmissible stages of the Plasmodium parasite that develop in the human and mosquito host is a crucial strategy for malaria control and elimination. Medicinal plants offer a prolific source for the discovery of new antimalarial compounds. The recent identification of the gametocytocidal activity of lophirone E, obtained from the African plant Lophira lanceolata (Ochnaceae), inspired the evaluation of the plant also against early sporogonic stages of the parasite development. The bioassay-guided phytochemical study led to the isolation of two known lanceolins and of a new glycosylated bichalcone, named glucolophirone C. Its stereostructure, including absolute configuration of the bichalcone moiety, was elucidated by means of NMR, HRMS, ECD and computational calculations. Lanceolin B proved to be a potent inhibitor of the development of Plasmodium early sporogonic stages indicating that the plant produces two different stage-specific antimalarial agents acting on transmissible stages in the human and mosquito host.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2020.112336DOI Listing
June 2020

Phytochemistry and neuroprotective effects of Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk.

J Complement Integr Med 2019 May 21;17(1). Epub 2019 May 21.

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry and Chemistry (LA.BIO.C.A), University Ouaga I Pr Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 P.O. Box: 7021, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.

Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk. or Eclipta prostrata (Linn.) or Eclipta erecta (Linn.) is an herbaceous plant well known in Asian as African traditional medicines. These extracts are used in traditional medicine for treatment of microbial diseases and certain metabolic disorders. This review aimed to investigate phytochemical profile and neuroprotective effects of E. alba (L.) Hassk. Several compounds belonging to the families of phenolics, alkaloids, terpenoids and polysaccharides have been isolated, identified or characterized from E. alba extracts. This plant has a diverse neuropharmacological profile. Thus, its extract improves cognitive deficits and also attenuated epileptic seizures. Phytomolecules implicated in these potentials are Eclalbasaponin II and luteolin, respectively. This document updates isolated and identified organic compounds from the extracts of E. alba and reviews their neuropharmacological activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2019-0026DOI Listing
May 2019

Phytochemistry, Antioxidant, and Hepatoprotective Potential of DC Extracts against Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

Medicines (Basel) 2018 May 7;5(2). Epub 2018 May 7.

Doctoral School of Health, University of Ouaga I Pr Joseph KI-ZERBO, P.O. Box 7021, 03 BP 848 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.

Burkina Faso is classified among the countries with a high prevalence (˃12%) of hepatitis. Hepatic diseases, such as cirrhosis—related to alcoholism—and hepatitis B and C, are the cause of the increase in cases of liver cancer. They promote the development of cancer by decreasing the natural cell death, causing problems with DNA repair, or by increasing the production of free radical toxins to the cell. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were nearly 639,000 deaths from liver cancer worldwide in 2014, hence the need to search for natural hepatoprotective molecules. To evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of extracts on rats and the antioxidant capacity of extracts in vitro and in vivo, and to perform phytochemistry. The ethanolic and aqueous extracts of the whole plant were used to evaluate hepatoprotection. The hepatotoxin used in our case was diethylenitrosamine. The animals were divided into groups of six. The sera of the treated animals were used for the determination of transaminases, and the liver homogenates were used for the determination of antioxidant. The total phenol and flavonoid contents, and the antioxidant properties of the extracts, were evaluated in vitro. The results of the in vitro antioxidant tests showed good antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract, using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test (0.08 ± 0.0018 μg/mL) and 2,2′-azinobis (3-ethylbenzolin-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) (246.05 ± 1.55 mmol TE/g). The in vivo tests showed, through the evaluation of the antioxidant in vivo and the biochemical parameters, that the ethanolic extract with the highest phenolic content had a good hepatoprotective capacity. The antioxidant activity of extracts would justify the observed hepatoprotective activity. These results confirmed that the plant is used in the treatment of liver diseases in traditional medicine in Burkina Faso.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines5020042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6023488PMC
May 2018

Ethnobotanical Study of Medicinal Plants Used as Anti-Obesity Remedies in the Nomad and Hunter Communities of Burkina Faso.

Medicines (Basel) 2016 Apr 26;3(2). Epub 2016 Apr 26.

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Applied Chemistry (LABIOCA), UFR/SVT, 09 BP 848 Ouagadougou 09, University of Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Background: Obesity is a global epidemic that affects both developed and developing countries. According to World Health Organization (WHO), in 2014, over 1.9 billion adults were overweight. Burkina Faso, like other countries, faces the problem of obesity, with a prevalence of 7.3%. The main cause is excessive intake of caloric foods combined with low physical activity, although genetic, endocrine and environmental influences (pollution) can sometimes be predisposing factors. This metabolic imbalance often leads to multiple pathologies (heart failure, Type II diabetes, cancers, ). Drugs have been developed for the treatment of these diseases; but in addition to having many side effects, locally these products are not economically accessible to the majority of the population. Burkina Faso, like the other countries bordering the Sahara, has often been confronted in the past with periods of famine during which populations have generally used anorectic plants to regulate their food needs. This traditional ethnobotanical knowledge has not been previously investigated. An ethnobotanical survey was conducted in Burkina Faso in the provinces of Seno (North) and Nayala (Northwest) to list the plants used by local people as an anorectic and/or fort weight loss.

Methods: The survey, conducted in the two provinces concerned traditional healers, herbalists, hunters, nomads and resourceful people with knowledge of plants. It was conducted over a period of two months and data were collected following a structured interview with the respondents. The approach was based on dialogue in the language of choice of the respondent and the use of a questionnaire. The data have been structured and then statistically analyzed.

Results: The fifty-five (55) respondents of the survey were aged between 40 and 80 years. Sixty-one (61) plant species, belonging to thirty-one (31) families were listed as appetite suppressants and/or for their anti-obesity properties. The main families of plants are Mimosaceae, Rubiaceae, Asclepiadaceae and Cesalpiniaceae. Fruits are the most used part of the plant organs. Consumption in the raw state or as a decoction are the two main forms of preparation.

Conclusion: The great diversity of plants cited by informants demonstrates the existence of rich local knowledge to address obesity in Burkina Faso. Evaluation of the biochemical activity of the extracts of the most cited species could allow the development of a phytomedicine economically accessible to the majority of the population. This could allow for the preservation of biodiversity in this region which is weakened by climate change because some of the species cited are in fragile state or are threatened with extinction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines3020009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5456226PMC
April 2016

Bioactive glycosides from the African medicinal plant Boerhavia erecta L.

Nat Prod Res 2015 20;29(20):1954-8. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

a School of Chemistry, University of Wollongong , Northfields Avenue, Wollongong , New South Wales 2522 , Australia.

Phytochemical studies of the previously unexplored stem of Boerhavia erecta from Burkina Faso, resulted in the isolation of an unreported glycoside 4, 2,3-dihydroxypropylbenzoate-3-O-β-[4″-methoxy] glucuronide as well as seven known glycosides (1-3, 5-8). The major isolate 5 and 8 indicated a significant inhibition against HIV integrase (IC50 10 and 22 μg/mL, respectively). The extracts and isolates were also tested for anti-malarial activity, but insignificant activity was observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2015.1013470DOI Listing
December 2015

Characteristics, composition and oxidative stability of Lannea microcarpa seed and seed oil.

Molecules 2014 Feb 24;19(2):2684-93. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

International Food Science Centre (IFSC A/S), Sønderskovvej, Lystrup 7 DK-8520, Denmark.

The proximate composition of seeds and main physicochemical properties and thermal stability of oil extracted from Lannea microcarpa seeds were evaluated. The percentage composition of the seeds was: ash (3.11%), crude oil (64.90%), protein (21.14%), total carbohydrate (10.85%) and moisture (3.24%). Physicochemical properties of the oil were: refractive index, 1.473; melting point, 22.60°C; saponification value, 194.23 mg of KOH/g of oil; iodine value, 61.33 g of I2/100 g of oil; acid value, 1.21 mg of KOH/g of oil; peroxide value, 1.48 meq of O2/kg of oil and oxidative stability index, 43.20 h. Oleic (43.45%), palmitic (34.45%), linoleic (11.20%) and stearic (8.35%) acids were the most dominant fatty acids. Triacylglycerols with equivalent carbon number (ECN) 48 and ECN 46 were dominant (46.96% and 37.31%, respectively). The major triacylglycerol constituents were palmitoyl diolein (POO) (21.23%), followed by dipalmitoyl olein (POP) (16.47%), palmitoyl linoleyl olein (PLO) (12.03%), dipalmitoyl linolein (PLP) (10.85%) and dioleoyl linolein (LOO) (9.30%). The total polyphenol and tocopherol contents were 1.39 mg GAE g-1 DW and 578.56 ppm, respectively. γ-Tocopherol was the major tocopherol (437.23 ppm). These analytical results indicated that the L. microcarpa seed oil could be used as a frying oil and in the cosmetic industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules19022684DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6271798PMC
February 2014

Do jasmonates play a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced local bioprotection of Medicago truncatula against root rot disease caused by Aphanomyces euteiches?

Mycorrhiza 2014 Jan 29;24(1):45-54. Epub 2013 Jun 29.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB), Department of Cell and Metabolic Biology, Weinberg 3, 06120, Halle, Germany.

Bioprotective effects of mycorrhization with two different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis, against Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of root rot in legumes, were studied in Medicago truncatula using phenotypic and molecular markers. Previous inoculation with an AM-fungus reduced disease symptoms as well as the amount of pathogen within roots, as determined by the levels of A. euteiches rRNA or transcripts of the gene sterol C24 reductase. Inoculation with R. irregularis was as efficient as that with F. mosseae. To study whether jasmonates play a regulatory role in bioprotection of M. truncatula by the AM fungi, composite plants harboring transgenic roots were used to modulate the expression level of the gene encoding M. truncatula allene oxide cyclase 1, a key enzyme in jasmonic acid biosynthesis. Neither an increase nor a reduction in allene oxide cyclase levels resulted in altered bioprotection by the AM fungi against root infection by A. euteiches. These data suggest that jasmonates do not play a major role in the local bioprotective effect of AM fungi against the pathogen A. euteiches in M. truncatula roots.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-013-0513-zDOI Listing
January 2014

Anti-nociceptive properties in rodents and the possibility of using polyphenol-rich fractions from sida urens L. (Malvaceae) against of dental caries bacteria.

Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2013 Jun 21;12:14. Epub 2013 Jun 21.

Background: Sida urens L. (Malvaceae) is in flora of Asian medicinal herbs and used traditionally in West of Burkina Faso for the treatment of infectious diseases and particularly used against, dental caries bacteria, fever, pain and possesses analgesic properties. This study was conducted to reveal the antibacterial effect against dental caries bacteria on the one hand, and evaluate their analgesic capacity in experimental model with Swiss mice and on the other hand, with an aim to provide a scientific basis for the traditional use of this plant for the management of dental caries bacteria.

Method: The antibacterial assays in this study were performed by using inhibition zone diameters, MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (Minimal bactericidal concentration) methods. On the whole the dental caries bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains) were used. Negative control was prepared using discs impregnated with 10% DMSO in water and commercially available Gentamicin from Alkom Laboratories LTD was used as positive reference standards for all bacterial strains. In acute toxicity test, mice received doses of extract (acetone/water extract) from Sida urens L. by intraperitoneal route and LD50 was determined in Swiss mice. As for analgesic effects, acetic acid writhing method was used in mice. The acetic acid-induced writhing method was used in mice with aim to study analgesic effects.

Results: The results showed that the highest antibacterial activities were founded with the polyphenol-rich fractions against all bacterial strains compared to the standard antibiotic. About preliminary study in acute toxicity test, LD50 value obtained was more than 5000 mg/kg b.w. Polyphenol-rich fractions produced significant analgesic effects in acetic acid-induced writhing method and in a dose-dependent inhibition was observed.

Conclusion: These results validate the ethno-botanical use of Sida urens L. (Malvaceae) and demonstrate the potential of this herbaceous as a potential antibacterial agent of dental caries that could be effectively used for future health care purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-0711-12-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3699430PMC
June 2013

Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae), medicinal plants of Burkina Faso.

BMC Complement Altern Med 2012 Aug 11;12:120. Epub 2012 Aug 11.

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Applied Chemistry, University of Ouagadougou, 09 P.O.Box: 848, Ouagadougou 09, Burkina Faso.

Background: Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae) are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso.

Method: For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test.

Results: For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease) according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p <0.05) and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed.

Conclusion: The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-12-120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478230PMC
August 2012

Antibacterial activity against β- lactamase producing Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants Staphylococcus aureus: Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination.

Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2012 Jun 20;11:18. Epub 2012 Jun 20.

Laboratoire de Biochimie et Chimie Appliquées (LABIOCA), UFR/SVT, Université de Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou 09, 09 BP 848, Burkina Faso.

Background: The present study reports the antibacterial capacity of alkaloid compounds in combination with Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants bacteria isolated from clinical samples. The resistance of different bacteria strains to the current antibacterial agents, their toxicity and the cost of the treatment have led to the development of natural products against the bacteria resistant infections when applied in combination with conventional antimicrobial drugs.

Method: The antibacterial assays in this study were performed by using inhibition zone diameters, MIC, MBC methods, the time-kill assay and the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination. On the whole, fifteen Gram-positive bacterial strains (MRSA/ARSA) were used. Negative control was prepared using discs impregnated with 10 % DMSO in water and commercially available Methicillin and Ampicillin from Alkom Laboratories LTD were used as positive reference standards for all bacterial strains.

Results: We noticed that the highest activities were founded with the combination of alkaloid compounds and conventional antibiotics against all bacteria strains. Then, results showed that after 7 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculums.

Conclusion: The results of this study showed that alkaloid compounds in combination with conventional antibiotics (Methicillin, Ampicillin) exhibited antimicrobial effects against microorganisms tested. These results validate the ethno-botanical use of Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. (Malvaceae) in Burkina Faso. Moreover, this study demonstrates the potential of this herbaceous as a source of antibacterial agent that could be effectively used for future health care purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-0711-11-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3464800PMC
June 2012

Antimicrobial activity of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) against co-trimoxazol-resistant bacteria strains.

Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2012 Feb 24;11. Epub 2012 Feb 24.

Laboratoire de Biochimie et Chimie Appliquées-LABIOCA, UFR/SVT, Université de Ouagadougou, 09 BP 848 Ouagadougou 09, Burkina Faso.

Background: The increased resistance of microorganisms to the currently used antimicrobials has lead to the evaluation of other agents that might have antimicrobial activity. Medicinal plants are sources of phytochemicals which are able to initiate different biological activities including antimicrobials

Materials And Methods: In vitro antibacterial (MIC, MBC and time-kill studies) of polyphenol-rich fractions from Sida alba L. (Malvaceae) was assessed using ten bacteria strains (Gram-negative and Gram-positive).

Results: All test bacteria were susceptible to the polyphenol-rich fractions. Time-kill results showed that after 5 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculum and the effect of polyphenol-rich fractions was faster on Enterococcus faecalis (Gram-positive bacterium) comparatively to the other bacteria strains.

Conclusion: The data analysis indicates that the tested of polyphenol-rich fractions has significant effects when compared with the standard antibiotic. These results therefore justify the traditional use of sida alba L., alone or in combination with other herbs to treat bacterial infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-0711-11-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3316130PMC
February 2012

Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activities of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L. Extracts.

Pharmaceuticals (Basel) 2012 Jun 15;5(6):613-28. Epub 2012 Jun 15.

Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Chimie Appliquées, UFR/SVT, Université de Ouagadougou, 03 BP 7021 Ouaga 03, Burkina Faso.

This paper describes a preliminary assessment of the nutraceutical value of Amaranthus cruentus (A. cruentus) and Amaranthus hybridus (A. hybridus), two food plant species found in Burkina Faso. Hydroacetonic (HAE), methanolic (ME), and aqueous extracts (AE) from the aerial parts were screened for in vitro antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins and betalains. Hydroacetonic extracts have shown the most diversity for secondary metabolites. The TLC analyses of flavonoids from HAE extracts showed the presence of rutin and other unidentified compounds. The phenolic compound contents of the HAE, ME and AE extracts were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and ranged from 7.55 to 10.18 mg Gallic acid equivalent GAE/100 mg. Tannins, flavonoids, and flavonols ranged from 2.83 to 10.17 mg tannic acid equivalent (TAE)/100 mg, 0.37 to 7.06 mg quercetin equivalent (QE) /100 mg, and 0.09 to 1.31 mg QE/100 mg, respectively. The betacyanin contents were 40.42 and 6.35 mg Amaranthin Equivalent/100 g aerial parts (dry weight) in A. cruentus and A. hybridus, respectively. Free-radical scavenging activity expressed as IC50 (DPPH method) and iron reducing power (FRAP method) ranged from 56 to 423 µg/mL and from 2.26 to 2.56 mmol AAE/g, respectively. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts of A. cruentus and A. hybridus were 3.18% and 38.22%, respectively. The A. hybridus extract showed the best antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibition activities. The results indicated that the phytochemical contents of the two species justify their traditional uses as nutraceutical food plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ph5060613DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3763657PMC
June 2012

Betacyanins and phenolic compounds from Amaranthus spinosus L. and Boerhavia erecta L.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2004 Jan-Feb;59(1-2):1-8

Institute of Food Technology, Section Plant Foodstuff Technology, Hohenheim University, Garbenstrasse 25, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany.

Stem bark extracts of Boerhavia erecta L. (erect spiderling) and Amaranthus spinosus L. (spiny amaranth), two wild growing weed plants used in traditional African medicine, were characterized with respect to their phenolic profile including the betalains. While the main betalains in A. spinosus were identified as amaranthine and isoamaranthine, the major betacyanins in B. erecta were betanin, isobetanin together with neobetanin. The latter showed higher betalain concentrations amounting to 186 mg/100 g, while the former contained 24 mg betacyanins in 100 g of the ground plant material. Extracts of A. spinosus were found to contain hydroxycinnamates, quercetin and kaempferol glycosides, whereas catechins, procyanidins and quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin glycosides were detected in B. erecta. The amounts of these compounds ranged from 305 mg/100 g for A. spinosus to 329 mg/100 g for B. erecta.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2004-1-201DOI Listing
May 2004
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