Publications by authors named "Adam Herdina"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relationship among respondent ethnicity, ethnic identity, acculturation, and homeless status on a homeless population's functional status.

J Clin Psychol 2006 Dec;62(12):1485-501

Psychology Department, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA 91750, USA.

This study investigated the relationship of homeless status, ethnic identity, respondent ethnicity (African American, Latino, Native American, and Anglo), and Latino, Anglo, and Mexican American orientation on the functional impairment (Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale, BASIS-32; S. V. Eisen, 1996) of 355 homeless men and women who were interviewed in Pomona, California. Multivariate analyses of variance results indicated that respondent ethnicity was related to several BASIS-32 subscales. Specifically, Anglo and African American homeless adults had greater functional impairment than did Latino or Native American respondents. In addition, high Anglo orientation among chronically homeless Latino respondents, with low ethnic identity was associated with higher levels of functional impairment on the BASIS-32 Psychosis subscale. The implications of these findings are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20323DOI Listing
December 2006

Effects of racial match on Asian American mental health consumer satisfaction.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Dec;5(4):197-208

Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, 1950 Third St., La Verne, California 91750, USA.

This study investigated the effects of consumer-provider racial match on consumer service satisfaction and treatment outcomes (i.e., Client Satisfaction Questionnaire and GAF-Posttest) of 96 outpatient consumers, 66 of whom were adults and 30 of whom were parent/caregivers of child consumers. Data was obtained by telephone interviews over a 6-week period. After controlling for four other variables, client satisfaction was higher for racially matched consumers. Racially matched child consumers also had higher GAF-Posttest scores. Implications of these findings are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1026224901243DOI Listing
December 2003