Publications by authors named "Abraham Pedroza-Torres"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Promising Role of miR-21 as a Cancer Biomarker and Its Importance in RNA-Based Therapeutics.

Mol Ther Nucleic Acids 2020 Jun 13;20:409-420. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología-Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, UNAM, Avenida San Fernando No. 22, Colonia Sección XVI, Tlalpan, CP 14080, Mexico City, Mexico; Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica, Periferico Sur 4809, Arenal Tepepan, Tlalpan, CP 14610, Mexico City, Mexico. Electronic address:

MicroRNAs are small noncoding transcripts that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression via base-pairing complementarity. Their role in cancer can be related to tumor suppression or oncogenic function. Moreover, they have been linked to processes recognized as hallmarks of cancer, such as apoptosis, invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Particularly, one of the first oncomiRs found upregulated in a variety of cancers, such as gliomas, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, was microRNA-21 (miR-21). Some of its target genes associated with cancer are PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog), PDCD4 (programmed cell death protein 4), RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), and STAT3 (signal transducer activator of transcription 3). As a result, miR-21 has been proposed as a plausible diagnostic and prognostic biomarker, as well as a therapeutic target for several types of cancer. Currently, research and clinical trials to inhibit miR-21 through anti-miR-21 oligonucleotides and ADM-21 are being conducted. As all of the evidence suggests, miR-21 is involved in carcinogenic processes; therefore, inhibiting it could have effects on more than one type of cancer. However, whether miR-21 can be used as a tissue-specific biomarker should be analyzed with caution. Consequently, the purpose of this review is to outline the available information and recent advances regarding miR-21 as a potential biomarker in the clinical setting and as a therapeutic target in cancer to highlight its importance in the era of precision medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.omtn.2020.03.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7118281PMC
June 2020

MicroRNAs in Tumor Cell Metabolism: Roles and Therapeutic Opportunities.

Front Oncol 2019 11;9:1404. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología - Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico.

Dysregulated metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells and is considered a hallmark of cancer. Altered tumor-metabolism confers an adaptive advantage to cancer cells to fulfill the high energetic requirements for the maintenance of high proliferation rates, similarly, reprogramming metabolism confers the ability to grow at low oxygen concentrations and to use alternative carbon sources. These phenomena result from the dysregulated expression of diverse genes, including those encoding microRNAs (miRNAs) which are involved in several metabolic and tumorigenic pathways through its post-transcriptional-regulatory activity. Further, the identification of key actionable altered miRNA has allowed to propose novel targeted therapies to modulated tumor-metabolism. In this review, we discussed the different roles of miRNAs in cancer cell metabolism and novel miRNA-based strategies designed to target the metabolic machinery in human cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2019.01404DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6917641PMC
December 2019

Production of chitosan-oligosaccharides by the chitin-hydrolytic system of Trichoderma harzianum and their antimicrobial and anticancer effects.

Carbohydr Res 2019 Dec 16;486:107836. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Facultad de Medicina. Departamento de Bioquímica. Laboratorio 7. Circuito Interior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria CP, 04510, Ciudad de México, Mexico. Electronic address:

Chitosan-oligosaccharides (COS) are low-molecular weight chitosan derivatives with interesting clinical applications. The optimization of both COS production and purification is an important step in the design of an efficient production system and for the exploration of new COS applications. Trichoderma harzianum is an innocuous biocontrol agent that represents a novel biotechnological tool due to the production of extracellular enzymes, including those that produce a COS mixture. In this work, we propose different systems for the production of COS using the T. harzianum chitinolitic system. A complete qualitative and quantitative analysis of a partially purified COS mixture were performed. Also, an evaluation of the anticancer and antimicrobial effects of the COS mixture was carried out. Three chitosan variants (colloidal, solid and solution) and two fungus stages (spores and mycelia) were tested for COS production. The best system consisted of the interaction of the solid chitosan and the fungal spores, producing a COS mixture containing species from the monomer to the hexamer, in a concentration range of 7-238 mg/mL, according to chromatographic analysis. The proposed purification method isolated the monomer and the dimer from the COS mixture. Moreover, the COS mixture has an inhibitory effect on the growth of bacteria and changes the morphology of yeasts. As anticancer compounds, COS inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells at concentration of 4 mg/mL and significantly reduced the survival rate of the cells. In conclusion, T. harzianum proved to be an efficient system for COS mixture production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carres.2019.107836DOI Listing
December 2019

Mutational landscape and intra-host diversity of human papillomavirus type 16 long control region and E6 variants in cervical samples.

Arch Virol 2019 Dec 24;164(12):2953-2961. Epub 2019 Sep 24.

Instituto de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológicos (InDRE) "Dr. Manuel Martínez Báez", Secretaría de Salud, Mexico City, Mexico.

Human papillomavirus genotype 16 (HPV16) is the most frequent high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) identified in cervical precursor lesions and cervical cancer (CC) worldwide. The oncogenic potential of HPV16 is partly dependent on the lineage involved in the infection and the presence of clinically relevant mutations. In this report, we present the distribution of HR-HPV and the mutational profile and intra-host variability of HPV16 lineages, based on analysis of the long control region (LCR) and the E6 gene in samples with normal cytology (n = 39), squamous intraepithelial lesions (n = 25), and CC (n = 39). HR-HPV genotyping was performed using multiplex real-time PCR. HPV16 lineage assignments and mutation frequencies were determined by conventional PCR and Sanger DNA sequencing, and intra-patient viral populations were analyzed using next-generation sequencing (NGS). The most frequent HR-HPV type was HPV16, followed by HPV31 and HPV18. The frequency of HPV16 sublineages was A1/A2 > D2 > D3 and B1. Moreover, the most frequent mutations, both in samples from this study and in the available sequences from Mexican isolates in the GenBank database were LCR-G7518A, which is involved in carcinogenesis, and E6-T350G (producing L83V), associated with persistence of infection. Otherwise, deep sequencing revealed high conservation of viral lineages and mutations, independently of the stages studied. In conclusion, the high frequency and stability of these molecular markers, as well as the circulating viral lineages, could be related to the incidence of CC associated with HPV16. Hence, they deserve a broader analysis to determine the risk of specific populations for progression of the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-019-04407-6DOI Listing
December 2019

Mexican BRCA1 founder mutation: Shortening the gap in genetic assessment for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients.

PLoS One 2019 23;14(9):e0222709. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Hereditary Cancer Clinic, National Cancer Institute, Mexico city, Mexico.

The deletion of exons 9 to 12 of BRCA1 (9-12 del BRCA1) is considered a founder mutation in the Mexican population. We evaluate the usefulness of the target detection of 9-12 del BRCA1 as the first molecular diagnostic strategy in patients with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC). We performed the genetic assessment of 637 patients with suspected HBOC. The region corresponding to the breakpoints for the 9-12 del BRCA1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An analysis of the clinical data of the carriers and non-carriers was done, searching for characteristics that correlated with the deletion. The 9-12 del BRCA1 was detected in 5% of patients with suspected HBOC (30/637). In patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, 13 of 30 were 9-12 del BRCA1 carriers, which represents 43%. We found a significant association between the 9-12 del BRCA1 carriers with triple negative breast cancer and high-grade papillary serous ovarian cancer. We concluded that the detection of the 9-12 del BRCA1 is useful as a first molecular diagnostic strategy in the Mexican population. In particular, it shortens the gap in genetic assessment in patients with triple negative breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0222709PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6756553PMC
March 2020

Correction to: Intratype variants of the E2 protein from human papillomavirus type 18 induce different gene expression profiles associated with apoptosis and cell proliferation.

Arch Virol 2019 07;164(7):1829

Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14080, Mexico City, Mexico.

The Given names of the author Alma Mariana Fuentes-González was incorrectly tagged in original publication and corrected here. The original article has been corrected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-019-04177-1DOI Listing
July 2019

The Secret Life of Translation Initiation in Prostate Cancer.

Front Genet 2019 30;10:14. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Oncologic Urology, National Institute of Cancer, Mexico City, Mexico.

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most prevalent cancer in men worldwide. Despite the advances understanding the molecular processes driving the onset and progression of this disease, as well as the continued implementation of screening programs, PCa still remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, in particular in low-income countries. It is only recently that defects of the translation process, i.e., the synthesis of proteins by the ribosome using a messenger (m)RNA as a template, have begun to gain attention as an important cause of cancer development in different human tissues, including prostate. In particular, the initiation step of translation has been established to play a key role in tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of three key aspects of protein synthesis in PCa, namely, misexpression of translation initiation factors, dysregulation of the major signaling cascades regulating translation, and the therapeutic strategies based on pharmacological compounds targeting translation as a novel alternative to those based on hormones controlling the androgen receptor pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2019.00014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6363655PMC
January 2019

Intratype variants of the E2 protein from human papillomavirus type 18 induce different gene expression profiles associated with apoptosis and cell proliferation.

Arch Virol 2019 Jul 10;164(7):1815-1827. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14080, Mexico City, Mexico.

Persistent infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are linked to the development of cervical cancer due to a deregulation of the productive viral cycle in the host cell, leading to cell transformation. The E2 viral protein is expressed early during an HPV infection and regulates viral replication and transcription. Other functions have been attributed to E2, such as the promotion of apoptosis that are independent of its role in the regulation of the expression of E6 and E7 viral oncogenes. Moreover, it has been shown that the HPV16 E2 protein has regulatory effects on cellular gene expression, suggesting that it participates in the modulation of different cellular processes. Intratype genomic variations within high-risk HPV types have an impact on the prognosis of HPV-related lesions. Nevertheless, the biological significance of HPV18 E2 intratype variations has not been analysed previously. The aim of this study was to determine whether HPV18 E2 intratype variations differentially modulate gene expression and whether cell-death-related genes are affected by variations in E2. We demonstrate that HPV18 E2 intratype Asian Amerindian (AsAi) and African (Af) variants differentially affect gene expression profiles. Although the E2-AsAi variant was found to modulate a larger number of cellular genes, both E2 variants affected similar cellular processes. Nevertheless, E2-AsAi and E2-Af variants showed differences in their ability to induce apoptosis, where E2-Af had a stronger effect. The differences in gene expression profiles in cells harbouring E2 intratype variants suggest a possible effect on diverse cellular signalling pathways, and this might suggest an approach for identifying biological processes regulated by HPV18 E2 intratype variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-018-04124-6DOI Listing
July 2019

MicroRNA-125 modulates radioresistance through targeting p21 in cervical cancer.

Oncol Rep 2018 Mar 18;39(3):1532-1540. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Cancer Genomics Group, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, México City 14080, Mexico.

Cervical cancer (CC) is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in women worldwide, and it is estimated that ~500,000 new patients are diagnosed with cervical cancer annually and that ~270,000 deaths occur each year. Patients with cervical cancer are treated with different radiotherapy schedules, either alone or with adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, nearly 50% of all patients with cervical cancer do not respond to standard treatment due to tumor radioresistance. In this scenario, several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been associated with the acquisition of the radioresistance phenotype. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role of miR‑125a in the acquisition of radioresistance in cervical cancer. The expression of miR‑125a was assessed by means of RT‑qPCR in 30 cervical cancer samples from patients receiving standard treatment and 3 induced radioresistant cervical cancer cell lines. In addition, we employed miR‑125a mimics and inhibitors to evaluate its function in the induction of radioresistance. We showed that miR‑125a was downregulated in patients with cervical cancer who did not respond to standard treatment. Concordantly, radioresistant SiHa, CaSki and HeLa cell lines had low levels of miR‑125a with respect to the sensitive cell lines. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR‑125a sensitized cervical cancer cells to radiation therapy through the downregulation of CDKN1A. Our data corroborate previously published studies in which it was demonstrated that miRNAs could play a role in the regulation of the process of radioresistance. Additionally, we showed that overexpression of miR‑125a could be used as a radioresistance biomarker in patients with cervical cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.2018.6219DOI Listing
March 2018

Dysregulation of miR-155-5p and miR-200-3p and the Anti-Non-Bilayer Phospholipid Arrangement Antibodies Favor the Development of Lupus in Three Novel Murine Lupus Models.

J Immunol Res 2017 4;2017:8751642. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 11340 Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by deregulated activation of T and B cells, autoantibody production, and consequent formation of immune complexes. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA), induced by chlorpromazine, procainamide, or manganese, provoke a disease resembling human lupus when administered to mice. These mice produce anti-NPA IgM and IgG antibodies and exhibit an increased number of TLR-expressing spleen cells and a modified gene expression associated with -dependent TLR4 signaling (including and ) and complement activation. Additionally, they showed a diminished gene expression related to apoptosis and NK cell activation. We hypothesized that such gene expression may be affected by miRNAs and so miRNA expression was studied. Twelve deregulated miRNAs were found. Six of them were common to the three lupus-like models. Their validation by qRT-PCR and TaqMan probes, including miR-342-3p, revealed that miR-155-5p and miR-200a-3p expression was statistically significant. Currently described functions for these miRNAs in autoimmune diseases such as SLE reveal their participation in inflammation, interferon production, germinal center responses, and antibody maturation. Taking into account these findings, we propose miR-155-5p and miR-200a-3p, together with the anti-NPA antibodies, as key players in the murine lupus-like models and possible biomarkers of the human SLE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/8751642DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733947PMC
August 2018

Gene signature based on degradome-related genes can predict distal metastasis in cervical cancer patients.

Tumour Biol 2017 Jun;39(6):1010428317711895

1 FES Iztacala, UBIMED, UNAM, Tlalnepantla, Mexico.

Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women worldwide, which mainly affects developing countries. The patients who suffer a recurrence and/or progression disease have a higher risk of developing distal metastases. Proteases comprising the degradome given its ability to promote cell growth, migration, and invasion of tissues play an important role during tumor development and progression. In this study, we used high-density microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the degradome profile and their inhibitors in 112 samples of patients diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer. Clinical follow-up was done during a period of 3 years. Using a correlation analysis between the response to treatment and the development of metastasis, we established a molecular signature comprising eight degradome-related genes (FAM111B, FAM111A, CFB, PSMB8, PSMB9, CASP7, PRSS16, and CD74) with the ability to discriminate patients at risk of distal metastases. In conclusion, present results show that molecular signature obtained from degradome genes can predict the possibility of metastasis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010428317711895DOI Listing
June 2017

Micro-RNAs as Potential Predictors of Response to Breast Cancer Systemic Therapy: Future Clinical Implications.

Int J Mol Sci 2017 06 2;18(6). Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Unidad de Biomedicina, FES-IZTACALA, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico (UNAM), Av. De Los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Ixtacala, Hab Los Reyes Ixtacala Barrio de los Árboles/Barrio de los Héroes, C.P. 54090 Tlalnepantla, México, Mexico.

Despite advances in diagnosis and new treatments such as targeted therapies, breast cancer (BC) is still the most prevalent tumor in women worldwide and the leading cause of death. The principal obstacle for successful BC treatment is the acquired or de novo resistance of the tumors to the systemic therapy (chemotherapy, endocrine, and targeted therapies) that patients receive. In the era of personalized treatment, several studies have focused on the search for biomarkers capable of predicting the response to this therapy; microRNAs (miRNAs) stand out among these markers due to their broad spectrum or potential clinical applications. miRNAs are conserved small non-coding RNAs that act as negative regulators of gene expression playing an important role in several cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, autophagy, genomic stability, and apoptosis. We reviewed recent data that describe the role of miRNAs as potential predictors of response to systemic treatments in BC. Furthermore, upon analyzing the collected published information, we noticed that the overexpression of miR-155, miR-222, miR-125b, and miR-21 predicts the resistance to the most common systemic treatments; nonetheless, the function of these particular miRNAs must be carefully studied and further analyses are still necessary to increase knowledge about their role and future potential clinical uses in BC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486005PMC
June 2017

Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identifies pathways with therapeutic potential in locally advanced cervical cancer.

Gynecol Oncol 2016 Nov 28;143(2):406-413. Epub 2016 Aug 28.

Laboratorio de Genómica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan), Av. San Fernando 22, Col. Sección XVI, C.P. 14080 Tlalpan, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico; Unidad de Biomedicina, FES-IZTACALA, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Avenida De Los Barrios S/N, Los Reyes Iztacala, C.P. 54090 Tlanepantla, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico. Electronic address:

Objective: The objective of the present study was to provide genomic and transcriptomic information that may improve clinical outcomes for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients by searching for therapeutic targets or potential biomarkers through the analysis of significantly altered signaling pathways in LACC.

Methods: Microarray-based transcriptome profiling of 89 tumor samples from women with LACC was performed. Through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis, significantly over-expressed genes in LACC were identified; these genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort, and the protein expression data were obtained from the Human Protein Atlas.

Results: A transcriptome analysis revealed 7530 significantly over-expressed genes in LACC samples. By KEGG analysis, we found 93 dysregulated signaling pathways, including the JAK-STAT, NOTCH and mTOR-autophagy pathways, which were significantly upregulated. We confirmed the overexpression of the relevant genes of each pathway, such as NOTCH1, JAK2, STAM1, SOS1, ADAM17, PSEN1, NCSTN, RPS6, STK11/LKB1 and MLTS8/GBL in LACC compared with normal cervical tissue epithelia.

Conclusions: Through comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic analyses, this work provides information regarding signaling pathways with promising therapeutic targets, suggesting novel target therapies to be considered in future clinical trials for LACC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.08.327DOI Listing
November 2016

A microRNA expression signature for clinical response in locally advanced cervical cancer.

Gynecol Oncol 2016 09 14;142(3):557-65. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Laboratorio de Genómica, Ciudad de México, Mexico; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM, FES-Iztacala, UBIMED, Tlalnepantla, Estado de México, Mexico. Electronic address:

Objective: Nearly 50% of patients who are diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer have an unfavorable pathological response to conventional treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers in cervical cancer; however, their role in identifying patients who do not respond to conventional treatment remains poorly investigated. Here, we identify a set of miRNAs that can be used as molecular markers to predict the pathological response in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving radiation and chemotherapy treatment.

Methods: Forty-one patients diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer were invited to participate in this study and enrolled after they signed an informed consent. Two patient cohorts were randomized for miRNA expression profiling, a discovery cohort (n=10) and a validation cohort (n=31); profiling was performed by means of a miScript miRNA PCR Array. After a median clinical follow-up of 45months, statistical analysis was performed to identify miRNAs that could discriminate non-responders from complete pathological responders to conventional treatment.

Results: miRNA expression profiling identified 101 miRNAs that showed significant differences between non-responders and complete pathological responders (p<0.05). Seven differentially expressed miRNAs were selected, and their expression patterns were confirmed in the validation phase; thus, miR-31-3p, -3676, -125a-5p, -100-5p, -125b-5p, and -200a-5p and miR-342 were significantly associated with clinical response. Expression of this miRNA signature above the median level was a significant predictor of non-response to standard treatment (p<0.001).

Conclusions: These seven validated miRNA signatures could be used as molecular biomarkers of chemo- and radio-resistance in locally advanced cervical cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.07.093DOI Listing
September 2016

Transcriptomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue in Obese Women in Response to Acupuncture Catgut Embedding Therapy with Moxibustion.

J Altern Complement Med 2016 Aug 12;22(8):658-68. Epub 2016 Jul 12.

1 Biotechnology Program, ENMH, Instituto Politécnico Nacional , Mexico City, Mexico .

Objective: Complementary and alternative medicine, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine, represents an efficient therapeutic option for obesity control. It was previously reported that acupuncture catgut embedding therapy (ACET) with moxibustion reduces body weight and reverts insulin resistance in obese women. This study aimed to evidence changes in adipokines and gene expression in adipose tissue that could explain the effects of ACET with moxibustion.

Design: Overweight/obese women were treated with ACET with moxibustion or sham acupuncture as control. Peripheral blood samples and fat biopsies were taken before and after intervention. Circulating adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and resistin) were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gene expression in adipose tissue was determined by cDNA microarray assays and assessed by quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results: ACET with moxibustion did not modify circulating adipokines levels. However, correlations with anthropometric and biochemical parameters were affected. Interestingly, transcriptional changes in adipose tissue revealed the modulation of genes participating in homeostasis control, lipid metabolism, olfactory transduction, and gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling pathway.

Conclusions: The effects of ACET with moxibustion on body weight and insulin resistance were associated with the regulation of biochemical events that are altered in obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2015.0200DOI Listing
August 2016

PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

Int J Oncol 2016 Jul 11;49(1):371-80. Epub 2016 May 11.

Laboratorio de Genómica Funcional, Unidad de Biomedicina, FES-Iztacala, UNAM, Tlalnepantla, México.

The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3515DOI Listing
July 2016

MicroRNAs in cervical cancer: evidences for a miRNA profile deregulated by HPV and its impact on radio-resistance.

Molecules 2014 May 16;19(5):6263-81. Epub 2014 May 16.

Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Laboratorio de Genómica, Mexico DF 14080, Mexico.

Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly demonstrated a causal role of high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in CC initiation and progression, affecting the cellular processes by targeting and inactivating p53 and pRB host proteins. HR-HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncoproteins have the ability to deregulate several cellular processes, mostly apoptosis, cell cycle control, migration, immune evasion, and induction of genetic instability, which promote the accumulation of mutations and aneuploidy. In this scenario, genomic profiles have shown that aberrant expression of cellular oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs have an important role in CC carcinogenesis. It has been stated that HPV infection and E6/E7 expression are essential but not sufficient to lead to CC development; hence other genetic and epigenetic factors have to be involved in this complex disease. Recent evidence suggests an important level of interaction among E6/E7 viral proteins and cellular miRNA, and other noncoding RNAs. The aim of the current review is to analyze recent data that mainly describe the interaction between HR-HPV established infections and specific cellular miRNAs; moreover, to understand how those interactions could affect radio-therapeutic response in tumor cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules19056263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6271743PMC
May 2014