Publications by authors named "Abdullah Wajid"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sugar Beverages and Dietary Sodas Impact on Brain Health: A Mini Literature Review.

Cureus 2018 Jun 7;10(6):e2756. Epub 2018 Jun 7.

Department of Cardiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.

Sugar-sweetened beverages containing caffeine are widely used among humans nowadays and can have negative consequences on the overall health. Our study aims to discuss the effects of these sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and how they can impact the health in different ways particularly on the brain. Some of the mechanisms by which soft drinks can exert adverse effects include an increase in glutathione-6-dehydrogenase level, increased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and dopamine alteration in brain waves on electroencephalography (EEG) eventually leading to stroke and dementia. They can increase the oxidative stress by a decreasing monoamine oxidase and acetylcholine esterase and antioxidants such as glutathione and catalase. The sleep quality and duration of sleep is also significantly affected by their increased consumption. Also, the consumption of sodium benzoate (found in beverages) on impairing memory, motor coordination, affecting reduced glutathione (GSH), increasing the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the brain and producing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children is emphasized. Finally, we will highlight how diet drinks can also be harmful and the maternal consumption of chocolate or soft drinks during pregnancy and postnatal period can be linked to cognitive impairment and child obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.2756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6080735PMC
June 2018

Does Obesity Increase the Risk of Dementia: A Literature Review.

Cureus 2018 May 21;10(5):e2660. Epub 2018 May 21.

Medicine, CMH Lahore Medical College and Institute of Dentistry, Lahore, PAK.

Obesity and dementia are both associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Review articles provide evidential support that obesity and dementia result in an early old-age memory crisis. Obesity triggering vascular dementia decreases not only blood supply to the brain, but also increases fat cells that damage the brain white matter leading to loss of cognitive and intellectual behaviour. Adipocyte-secreted proteins and inflammatory cytokines explain the association between obesity and increased risk of dementia. Late-life elevated body mass index (BMI) confers a lower risk of having dementia. The hormone leptin explained the mechanism for the reverse association. Future studies need to reveal the linkage between adiposity and excess risk of dementia and AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.2660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6054325PMC
May 2018

Refusal of hemodialysis by hospitalized chronic kidney disease patients in Pakistan.

Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2018 Mar-Apr;29(2):401-408

Department of Nephrology, Sharif Medical and Dental College, Lahore, Pakistan.

In Pakistan, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are commonly diagnosed at a late stage. There is little information about the refusal of hemodialysis by hospitalized CKD patients who need hemodialysis (HD) and reasons for acceptance and refusal among these patients. All patients with Stage V CKD who had medical indications to undergo HD and were hospitalized at a tertiary care facility over a six-month period were invited to participate in this study. Patients were surveyed regarding acceptance or refusing of HD and reasons for their decisions. Demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics of patients were compared between patients who accepted or refused HD. A total of 125 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 47.9 ±12.1 years. The mean duration of diagnosis of CKD was 2.5 ± 0.6 months. Of all patients, 72 (57.6%) agreed to do HD and 53 (42.4%) refused HD. Patients with arteriovenous fistula in place (27.1 vs. 9.1%, P 0.02) and those in the middle- or higher-income group (64.4% vs. 38.6%, p = 0.03) were more willing to undergo HD. Trust in doctor's advice (86.1%) was the most common reason for acceptance of HD. Frequency of HD per week (52.8%), lifelong and permanent nature of HD (50.9%), advice by family members or friends (37.7%), perception of poor quality of life on HD (35.8%), and fear of HD needles and complications during HD (33.9%) were the most common reasons for refusal. Refusal of HD is common among hospitalized CKD patients with medical indications to undergo HD, especially in lower income group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1319-2442.229270DOI Listing
October 2019

ECG Abnormalities In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2017 Jan-Mar;29(1):61-64

Department of Nephrology, Sharif Medical and Dental College, Lahore, Pakistan.

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in CKD patients. However, there is variation in literature regarding frequency of ECG abnormalities in CKD patients and limited information in local population.

Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. All patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility over a 6-month period were included. All patients underwent 12 lead electrocardiograms (ECG). ECG abnormalities were defined based on accepted standard criteria.

Results: Total number of patients included in the study was 124. Mean age of all patients was 49.9±13.8 years, 106 (84.8%) had hypertension, 84 (70%) had diabetes mellitus, and 35 (29.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean serum creatinine was 7.2±3.4 mg/dl, mean eGFR was 10.6±9.2 ml/min/1.73 m2. Overall 78.4% of all CKD patients have one or more ECG abnormality. Left ventricular hypertrophy (40%), Q waves (27.2%), ST segment elevation or depression (23.4%), prolonged QRS duration (19.2%), tachycardia (17.6%) and left and right atrial enlargement (17.6%) were the most common abnormalities.

Conclusions: ECG abnormalities are common in hospitalized CKD patients in local population. All hospitalized CKD patients should undergo ECG to screen for cardiovascular disease.
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April 2019

Frequency of Hepatitis C in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

Pak J Med Sci 2017 Jan-Feb;33(1):18-21

Prof. Dr. Tahir Shafi, Department of Nephrology, Sharif Medical and Dental College, Sharif Medical City Road JatiUmra, Lahore, Pakistan.

Background And Objectives: Hepatitis C and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are major global health problems and are highly prevalent in Pakistan. There is limited information on prevalence of hepatitis C in patients with CKD not yet on dialysis. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of hepatitis C in hospitalized chronic kidney disease patients at a tertiary care center in Pakistan.

Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. Patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy and who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility were included. Hepatitis C was tested using 3 generation enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hepatitis C RNA was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients with positive ELISA.

Results: A total of 180 patients were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 48.7±14.9 years. Of all patients, 105 (58.3%) were males and 75 (41.7%) were females, 152 (84.4%) had hypertension, 113 (62.8%) had diabetes mellitus and 26 (14.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean eGFR of patients was 11.4±9.4 ml/min/1.73 m2. Of all patients with CKD, 49 (27.2%) had hepatitis C test positive by ELISA. Hepatitis C PCR testing was done in 39 patients with hepatitis C ELISA positive status and 29 (74.4%) tested positive. Risk factors and clinical characteristics of patients with and without positive hepatitis C antibody by ELISA were similar.

Conclusion: A significant proportion of hospitalized CKD patients have hepatitis C. Strict universal infection control measures should be implemented in nephrology wards to prevent transmission of hepatitis C infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12669/pjms.331.11553DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5368304PMC
April 2017
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