Publications by authors named "Abdul R Rishi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Complete lung collapse as a rare complication of sarcoidosis-associated mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

Respirol Case Rep 2021 Apr 10;9(4):e00739. Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Department of Pulmonology, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Mayo Clinic health System Eau Claire WI USA.

Complete lung collapse associated with sarcoidosis is exceedingly rare. Although lymphoma should be ruled out when patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy develop lung collapse, sarcoidosis should be considered in the differential, especially when associated with fibrosing mediastinitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcr2.739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7946853PMC
April 2021

Association of elevated serumfree light chains with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

Blood Cancer J 2019 08 5;9(8):59. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and its precursor, monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), are heritable. Serumfree light-chain (sFLC) measures are a prognostic factor for CLL, but their role in susceptibility to CLL is not clear. We investigated differences between sFLC measurements in pre-treatment serum from five groups to inform the association of sFLC with familial and sporadic CLL: (1) familial CLL (n = 154), (2) sporadic CLL (n = 302), (3) familial MBL (n = 87), (4) unaffected first-degree relatives from CLL/MBL families (n = 263), and (5) reference population (n = 15,396). The percent of individuals having elevated monoclonal and polyclonal sFLCs was compared using age-stratified and age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression models. In age groups >50 years, monoclonal sFLC elevations were increased in sporadic and familial CLL cases compared to the reference population (p's < 0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in sFLC monoclonal or polyclonal elevations between familial and sporadic CLL cases (p's > 0.05). Unaffected relatives and MBL cases from CLL/MBL families, ages >60 years, showed elevated monoclonal sFLC, compared to the reference population (p's < 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate monoclonal sFLC elevations in CLL cases compared to controls. Monoclonal sFLC levels may provide additional risk information in relatives of CLL probands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41408-019-0220-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6683199PMC
August 2019

Lack of Utility of Anti-tTG IgG to Diagnose Celiac Disease When Anti-tTG IgA Is Negative.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2017 05;64(5):726-729

*Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine †Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota ‡Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics §Division of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Objectives: Guidelines for diagnosing celiac disease (CD) recommend initial testing with a highly sensitive serologic test for anti-tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibodies (tTG IgA). When the probability of CD is high, IgA deficiency should be considered. The 2 approaches to address this include measuring "both tTG IgA and tTG IgG" or measuring "total IgA." We aim to assess the utility of an isolated positive tTG IgG result in diagnosing CD.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing serologic testing for CD from January 1997 to June 2014. Patients with positive tTG IgG and negative tTG IgA were included. Moreover, all patients who had any other positive CD-specific serologic findings were excluded. Demographics, clinical presentation, tests, and biopsy results were recorded.

Results: The indication for checking celiac serology was gastrointestinal symptoms in 172 of 233 patients, iron deficiency anemia in 12, and high-risk screening in 48. Small bowel biopsy was performed in 178 patients (77%); 160 had normal results and 18 had histologic changes suggestive of enteropathy. Nine patients had increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, and 9 had partial villous atrophy. Only 6 cases of CD were, however, confirmed. The utility of isolated tTG IgG in diagnosis of CD was low at 3% (6/178).

Conclusion: In this cohort of patients, the utility of isolated tTG IgG in diagnosing CD was low at 3%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001351DOI Listing
May 2017

Refractory celiac disease.

Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 2016 16;10(4):537-46. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

a Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology , Mayo Clinic , Rochester , MN , USA.

Refractory celiac disease (RCD) affects patients who have failed to heal after 6-12 months of a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) and when other causes of symptoms (including malignancy) have been ruled out. It may also occur in patients who previously had responded to a long-term GFD. RCD may be categorized as RCD1 (normal immunophenotype) and RCD2 (aberrant immunophenotype). RCD1 usually responds to a continued GFD, nutritional support, and therapeutic agents such as corticosteroids. In contrast, clinical response in RCD2 is incomplete and prognosis is often poor. RCD (particularly RCD2) is associated with serious complications, such as ulcerative jejunitis and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Strict clinical and laboratory criteria should be used to diagnose RCD and specialized tests for aberrancy and clonality should be interpreted in the context of their sensitivity and specificity. Adequate nutritional support and anti-inflammatory treatment may even allow patients with RCD2 to attain a clinical remission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17474124.2016.1124759DOI Listing
December 2016