Publications by authors named "Abdessalem Rekiki"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reducing hypoxia and inflammation during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by targeting the Interleukin-1 receptor.

Sci Rep 2016 05 24;6:26490. Epub 2016 May 24.

Unité de recherche Cytokines &Inflammation, Institut Pasteur, Paris.

Hypoxia as a result of pulmonary tissue damage due to unresolved inflammation during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is associated with a poor outcome. Aspergillus fumigatus can exploit the hypoxic microenvironment in the lung, but the inflammatory response required for fungal clearance can become severely disregulated as a result of hypoxia. Since severe inflammation can be detrimental to the host, we investigated whether targeting the interleukin IL-1 pathway could reduce inflammation and tissue hypoxia, improving the outcome of IPA. The interplay between hypoxia and inflammation was investigated by in vivo imaging of hypoxia and measurement of cytokines in the lungs in a model of corticosteroid immunocompromised and in Cxcr2 deficient mice. Severe hypoxia was observed following Aspergillus infection in both models and correlated with development of pulmonary inflammation and expression of hypoxia specific transcripts. Treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist reduced hypoxia and slightly, but significantly reduced mortality in immunosuppressed mice, but was unable to reduce hypoxia in Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Our data provides evidence that the inflammatory response during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and in particular the IL-1 axis, drives the development of hypoxia. Targeting the inflammatory IL-1 response could be used as a potential immunomodulatory therapy to improve the outcome of aspergillosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep26490DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877709PMC
May 2016

The chemokine receptor CXCR6 controls the functional topography of interleukin-22 producing intestinal innate lymphoid cells.

Immunity 2014 Nov 6;41(5):776-88. Epub 2014 Nov 6.

Innate Immunity Unit, Institut Pasteur, 25 rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris, France; Inserm U668, 75724 Paris, France. Electronic address:

Interleukin-22 (IL-22) plays a critical role in mucosal defense, although the molecular mechanisms that ensure IL-22 tissue distribution remain poorly understood. We show that the CXCL16-CXCR6 chemokine-chemokine receptor axis regulated group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3) diversity and function. CXCL16 was constitutively expressed by CX3CR1(+) intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) and coexpressed with IL-23 after Citrobacter rodentium infection. Intestinal ILC3s expressed CXCR6 and its ablation generated a selective loss of the NKp46(+) ILC3 subset, a depletion of intestinal IL-22, and the inability to control C. rodentium infection. CD4(+) ILC3s were unaffected by CXCR6 deficiency and remained clustered within lymphoid follicles. In contrast, the lamina propria of Cxcr6(-/-) mice was devoid of ILC3s. The loss of ILC3-dependent IL-22 epithelial stimulation reduced antimicrobial peptide expression that explained the sensitivity of Cxcr6(-/-) mice to C. rodentium. Our results delineate a critical CXCL16-CXCR6 crosstalk that coordinates the intestinal topography of IL-22 secretion required for mucosal defense.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2014.10.007DOI Listing
November 2014

A step beyond BRET: Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL).

J Vis Exp 2014 May 23(87). Epub 2014 May 23.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur;

Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL) is a radiative excitation-emission process that produces increased signal and contrast enhancement in vitro and in vivo. FUEL shares many of the same underlying principles as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET), yet greatly differs in the acceptable working distances between the luminescent source and the fluorescent entity. While BRET is effectively limited to a maximum of 2 times the Förster radius, commonly less than 14 nm, FUEL can occur at distances up to µm or even cm in the absence of an optical absorber. Here we expand upon the foundation and applicability of FUEL by reviewing the relevant principles behind the phenomenon and demonstrate its compatibility with a wide variety of fluorophores and fluorescent nanoparticles. Further, the utility of antibody-targeted FUEL is explored. The examples shown here provide evidence that FUEL can be utilized for applications where BRET is not possible, filling the spatial void that exists between BRET and traditional whole animal imaging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/51549DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4207116PMC
May 2014

In vitro and in vivo demonstrations of Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL).

Methods Mol Biol 2014 ;1098:259-70

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful technique that allows for deep-tissue analysis in living, intact organisms. However, in vivo optical imaging is compounded by difficulties due to light scattering and absorption. While light scattering is relatively difficult to overcome and compensate, light absorption by biological tissue is strongly dependent upon wavelength. For example, light absorption by mammalian tissue is highest in the blue-yellow part of the visible energy spectrum. Many natural bioluminescent molecules emit photonic energy in this range, thus in vivo optical detection of these molecules is primarily limited by absorption. This has driven efforts for probe development aimed to enhance photonic emission of red light that is absorbed much less by mammalian tissue using either direct genetic manipulation, and/or resonance energy transfer methods. Here we describe a recently identified alternative approach termed Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL), where bioluminescent molecules are able to induce a fluorescent response from fluorescent nanoparticles through an epifluorescence mechanism, thereby significantly increasing both the total number of detectable photons as well as the number of red photons produced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-718-1_20DOI Listing
May 2014

In vitro characterization of Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence: broadening the scope of energy transfer.

Methods 2014 Mar 14;66(2):353-61. Epub 2013 Sep 14.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr. Roux, 75724 Paris cedex 15, France. Electronic address:

Energy transfer mechanisms represent the basis for an array of valuable tools to infer interactions in vitro and in vivo, enhance detection or resolve interspecies distances such as with resonance. Based upon our own previously published studies and new results shown here we present a novel framework describing for the first time a model giving a view of the biophysical relationship between Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL), a conventional radiative excitation-emission process, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. We show here that in homogeneous solutions and in fluorophore-targeted bacteria, FUEL is the dominant mechanism responsible for the production of red-shifted photons. The minor resonance contribution was ascertained by comparing the intensity of the experimental signal to its theoretical resonance counterpart. Distinctive features of the in vitro FUEL signal include a macroscopic depth dependency, a lack of enhancement upon targeting at a constant fluorophore concentration cf and a non-square dependency on cf. Significantly, FUEL is an important, so far overlooked, component of all resonance phenomena which should guide the design of appropriate controls when elucidating interactions. Last, our results highlight the potential for FUEL as a means to enhance in vivo and in vitro detection through complex media while alleviating the need for targeting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2013.09.005DOI Listing
March 2014

In vivo excitation of nanoparticles using luminescent bacteria.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Jun 21;109(23):8890-5. Epub 2012 May 21.

Plate-Forme d'Imagerie Dynamique, Imagopole, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris cedex 15, France.

The lux operon derived from Photorhabdus luminescens incorporated into bacterial genomes, elicits the production of biological chemiluminescence typically centered on 490 nm. The light-producing bacteria are widely used for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. However, in living samples, a common difficulty is the presence of blue-green absorbers such as hemoglobin. Here we report a characterization of fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, a phenomenon that exploits radiating luminescence to excite nearby fluorophores by epifluorescence. We show that photons from bioluminescent bacteria radiate over mesoscopic distances and induce a red-shifted fluorescent emission from appropriate fluorophores in a manner distinct from bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. Our results characterizing fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrate how the resulting blue-to-red wavelength shift is both necessary and sufficient to yield contrast enhancement revealing mesoscopic proximity of luminescent and fluorescent probes in the context of living biological tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1204516109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384150PMC
June 2012

Recombinant 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein IncA as a candidate antigen for serodiagnosis of Chlamydophila pecorum.

Vet Microbiol 2010 Jul 6;143(2-4):424-8. Epub 2009 Dec 6.

Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UR1282, Infectiologie Animale et Santé Publique, F-37380 Nouzilly (Tours), France.

Chlamydophila pecorum strains are commonly found in the intestine and vaginal mucus of asymptomatic ruminants and may therefore induce a positive serological response when the animals are tested for C. abortus. They have also been associated with different pathological diseases in ruminants, swine and koala. The aim of this study was to identify specific C. pecorum immunodominant antigens which could be used in ELISA tests allowing to distinguish between animals infected with C. pecorum and those infected with other chlamydial species. A gene encoding 35-kDa inclusion membrane protein incA of C. pecorum was isolated by immunoscreening of the C. pecorum DNA library using ovine anti-C. pecorum antibodies. The recombinant IncA protein did not react with a murine serum directed against C. abortus but did react with a specific monoclonal antibody of C. pecorum and toward several ovine serum samples obtained after experimental infection with different C. pecorum strains. This protein could be a good candidate for specific diagnosis of C. pecorum infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.11.017DOI Listing
July 2010

Simultaneous differential detection of Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila pecorum and Coxiella burnetii from aborted ruminant's clinical samples using multiplex PCR.

BMC Microbiol 2009 Jul 1;9:130. Epub 2009 Jul 1.

Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UR1282, Infectiologie Animale et Santé Publique (IASP), F-37380 Nouzilly, France.

Background: Chlamydiosis and Q fever, two zoonosis, are important causes of ruminants' abortion around the world. They are caused respectively by strictly intracellular and Gram negative bacterium Chlamydophila abortus (Cp. abortus) and Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). Chlamydophila pecorum (Cp. pecorum) is commonly isolated from the digestive tract of clinically inconspicuous ruminants but the abortive and zoonotic impact of this bacterium is still unknown because Cp. pecorum is rarely suspected in abortion cases of small ruminants. We have developed a multiplex PCR (m-PCR) for rapid simultaneous differential detection of Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii in clinical samples taken from infected animals.

Results: Specific PCR primers were designed and a sensitive and specific m-PCR was developed to detect simultaneously, in one tube reaction, three specific fragments of 821, 526 and 687-bp long for Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii respectively. This m-PCR assay was performed on 253 clinical samples taken from infected ruminant's flocks that have showed problems of abortion diseases. Thus, 67 samples were infected by either one of the three pathogens: 16 (13 vaginal swabs and 3 placentas) were positive for Cp. abortus, 2 were positive for Cp. pecorum (1 vaginal swab and 1 placenta) and 49 samples (33 vaginal swabs, 11 raw milks, 4 faeces and 1 placenta) were positive for C. burnetii. Two vaginal swabs were m-PCR positive of both Cp. abortus and C. burnetii and none of the tested samples was shown to be infected simultaneously with the three pathogens.

Conclusion: We have successfully developed a rapid multiplex PCR that can detect and differentiate Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii; with a good sensitivity and specificity. The diagnosis of chlamydiosis and Q fever may be greatly simplified and performed at low cost. In addition, the improvement in diagnostic techniques will enhance our knowledge regarding the prevalence and the pathogenetic significance of Q fever and chlamydiosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-9-130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2725139PMC
July 2009

Identification and characterisation of coding tandem repeat variants in incA gene of Chlamydophila pecorum.

Vet Res 2008 Nov-Dec;39(6):56. Epub 2008 Jul 25.

INRA, UR1282, Infectiologie Animale et Santé Publique, Centre de recherche de Tours, F-37380 Nouzilly, France.

Bacteria of the family Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular pathogens of human and animals. Chlamydophila pecorum is associated with different pathological conditions in ruminants, swine and koala. To characterize a coding tandem repeat (CTR) identified at the 3' end of incA gene of C. pecorum, 51 strains of different chlamydial species were examined. The CTR were observed in 18 of 18 tested C. pecorum isolates including symptomatic and asymptomatic animals from diverse geographical origins. The CTR were also found in two strains of C. abortus respectively isolated from faeces from a healthy ewe and from a goat belonging to asymptomatic herds, but were absent in C. abortus strains isolated from clinical disease specimens, and in tested strains of C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis and C. trachomatis. The number of CTR repeats is variable and encode several motifs that are rich in alanine and proline. The CTR-derived variable structure of incA, which encode the Chlamydiaceae-specific type III secreted inclusion membrane protein, IncA, may be involved in the adaptation of C. pecorum to its environment by allowing it to persist in the host cell.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/vetres:2008032DOI Listing
January 2009

Combined vaccination of live 1B Chlamydophila abortus and killed phase I Coxiella burnetii vaccine does not destroy protection against chlamydiosis in a mouse model.

Can J Vet Res 2004 Jul;68(3):226-8

Unité de Pathologie Infectieuse et Immunologie, INRA-Centre de Tours, Nouzilly 37380 France.

Q fever and chlamydiosis often affect ovine and caprine flocks simultaneously or successively. Combination vaccines effective against these 2 diseases would be of great value in veterinary medicine. Unfortunately, the current effective vaccines are a live vaccine for chlamydiosis and killed vaccine for Q fever. Vaccination of mice with live chlamydiosis vaccine 1B and killed phase I vaccine against Q fever at 2 points on the back at the same time produced good protection against chlamydial abortion. This suggests that it may be possible to vaccinate ewes and goats against chlamydiosis and Q fever simultaneously.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1142145PMC
July 2004

Isolation and characterisation of local strains of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) from Tunisia.

Vet Res 2002 Mar-Apr;33(2):215-22

Institut de la Recherche Vétérinaire de Tunisie, La Rabta.

Chlamydiosis is one of the major diseases that can lead to abortion in ewes. Since 1997, in 5 regions of Tunisia, Chlamydia-related abortions have been reported in 15 sheep and goat flocks. One hundred and sixty-six sera and 50 vaginal swab samples were collected from adult ewes. Chlamydial antigens were detected in 29 (58%) of the vaginal swabs using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) while 9 (18%) were positive by cell culture. Five strains were recovered from 4 different sheep flocks. Monoclonal antibody profiles and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region showed that these isolates were C. abortus. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), these Tunisian strains were shown to exhibit the same pattern as strains isolated in France.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/vetres:2002009DOI Listing
July 2002