Publications by authors named "Abdelmounem E Abdo"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa: a multicountry observational study from the Africa Liver Cancer Consortium.

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2017 02 3;2(2):103-111. Epub 2016 Dec 3.

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Cape Coast, Ghana.

Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death in Africa, but there is still no comprehensive description of the current status of its epidemiology in Africa. We therefore initiated an African hepatocellular carcinoma consortium aiming to describe the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa.

Methods: We did a multicentre, multicountry, retrospective observational cohort study, inviting investigators from the African Network for Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases to participate in the consortium to develop hepatocellular carcinoma research databases and biospecimen repositories. Participating institutions were from Cameroon, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. Clinical information-demographic characteristics, cause of disease, liver-related blood tests, tumour characteristics, treatments, last follow-up date, and survival status-for patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma between Aug 1, 2006, and April 1, 2016, were extracted from medical records by participating investigators. Because patients from Egypt showed differences in characteristics compared with patients from the other countries, we divided patients into two groups for analysis; Egypt versus other African countries. We undertook a multifactorial analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model to identify factors affecting survival (assessed from the time of diagnosis to last known follow-up or death).

Findings: We obtained information for 2566 patients at 21 tertiary referral centres (two in Egypt, nine in Nigeria, four in Ghana, and one each in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, Sudan, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda). 1251 patients were from Egypt and 1315 were from the other African countries (491 from Ghana, 363 from Nigeria, 277 from Ivory Coast, 59 from Cameroon, 51 from Sudan, 33 from Ethiopia, 21 from Tanzania, and 20 from Uganda). The median age at which hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed significantly later in Egypt than the other African countries (58 years [IQR 53-63] vs 46 years [36-58]; p<0·0001). Hepatitis C virus was the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in Egypt (1054 [84%] of 1251 patients), and hepatitis B virus was the leading cause in the other African countries (597 [55%] of 1082 patients). Substantially fewer patients received treatment specifically for hepatocellular carcinoma in the other African countries than in Egypt (43 [3%] of 1315 vs 956 [76%] of 1251; p<0·0001). Among patients with survival information (605 [48%] of 1251 in Egypt and 583 [44%] of 1315 in other African countries), median survival was shorter in the other African countries than in Egypt (2·5 months [95% CI 2·0-3·1] vs 10·9 months [9·6-12·0]; p<0·0001). Factors independently associated with poor survival were: being from an African countries other than Egypt (hazard ratio [HR] 1·59 [95% CI 1·13-2·20]; p=0·01), hepatic encephalopathy (2·81 [1·72-4·42]; p=0·0004), diameter of the largest tumour (1·07 per cm increase [1·04-1·11]; p<0·0001), log α-fetoprotein (1·10 per unit increase [1·02-1·20]; p=0·0188), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 3-4 (2·92 [2·13-3·93]; p<0·0001) and no treatment (1·79 [1·44-2·22]; p<0·0001).

Interpretation: Characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma differ between Egypt and other African countries. The proportion of patients receiving specific treatment in other African countries was low and their outcomes were extremely poor. Urgent efforts are needed to develop health policy strategies to decrease the burden of hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa.

Funding: None.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(16)30161-3DOI Listing
February 2017

Detection of Helicobacter pylori glmM gene in bovine milk using Nested polymerase chain reaction.

Vet World 2015 Jul 26;8(7):913-7. Epub 2015 Jul 26.

Department of Gastroenterology, Director of the National Centre for Gastrointestinal and liver disease, Ibnsina Hospital, Alamarat (St. 17) postal code 122117 P. O. Box: 15004, Khartoum, Sudan.

Aim: The aim was to detect the glmM gene of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in cow's milk from different dairy farms in Khartoum State using Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

Materials And Methods: A total of 50 milk samples were collected from different dairy farms in Khartoum State (13 from Khartoum, 24 Khartoum North, and 13 from Omdurman Provinces).

Results: The generated results showed that 11/50 (22%) were harboring the investigated H. pylori glmM gene in Khartoum State (1/13 [7.7%] Khartoum, 9/24 [37.5%] Khartoum North, and 1/13 [7.7%] Omdurman provinces, respectively).

Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report on the detection of H. pylori glmM gene in cattle milk in Khartoum State. Nonetheless, the high percentages of H. pylori DNA detection in milk opened new avenues toward exploring the risk of human infection with H. pylori through the consumption of raw milk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2015.913-917DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4774687PMC
July 2015
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