Publications by authors named "Abdelmageed M Othman"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Synthesis, antimicrobial, anti-cancer and in silico studies of new urea derivatives.

Bioorg Chem 2021 Jul 29;112:104953. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sadat City, Menoufia, Egypt.

The reaction of an alkyl or aryl isocyanates with some primary amines in acetonitrile at room temperature afforded the corresponding alkyl- and aryl-urea derivatives. All the prepared urea compounds have been elucidated by FTIR, NMR, and elemental analysis. The compounds 1 and 3 were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The 4-tolylsulfonyl isocyanate reacted with the aryl amines 1, 2, 3, and 2,4-dichloroaniline to afford the corresponding sulfonylurea derivatives 5-8. Likewise, the reaction of the isocyanates with 2,4-dichloroaniline, 5-methyl isoxazole-3-amine, and 2-aminothiazole derivatives gave the corresponding urea derivatives 9-17. All the prepared compounds 5-17 were tested in vitro as anti-microbial and anti-HepG2 agents. Moreover, analyzing gene expression of TP53-exon4 and TP53-exon7, DNA damage values, and DNA fragmentation percentages have been discussed. The compounds 5 and 8 recorded the highest activity against the tested microbial strains with maximum activity against C. albicans (50 mm) and B. mycoides (40 mm), respectively. The compounds 5 inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. aureus, and C. Albicans at the MIC level of 0.0489 µM, while the compound 8 was able to inhibit the visible growth of E. coli and C. albicans at MIC value of 3.13 µM and S. aureus at 0.3912 µM. In the same line, compound 5 showed the best cytotoxic activity against the HepG2 cell line (IC = 4.25 µM) compared to 5 fluorouracil with IC = 316.25 µM. Expression analysis of liver cancer related to a gene including TP53-exon4 and TP53-exon7 was used in HepG2 Liver cancer cell lines using RT-qPCR. The expression values of TP53-exon4 and TP53-exon7 genes were decreased. The DNA damage values and DNA fragmentation percentages were increased significantly (P < 0.01) in the treated HepG2 (5) sample compared with the negative control. Docking studies were performed for the synthetic compounds against 2 bacterial proteins (DNA gyrase subunit B, and penicillin binding protein 1a) that are known targets for some antibiotics, and one cell division protein kinase 2 (CDK2) as target for anticancer drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2021.104953DOI Listing
July 2021

Amperometric biosensor based on coupling aminated laccase to functionalized carbon nanotubes for phenolics detection.

Int J Biol Macromol 2020 Jun 10;153:855-864. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Department of Molecular Enzymology, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknechtstrasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Golm, Germany.

A biosensor for phenolic compounds based on a chemically modified laccase from Coriolus hirsuta immobilized on functionalized screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) was achieved. Different enzyme modifications and immobilization strategies were analyzed. The electrochemical response of the immobilized laccase on SPCEs modified with carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNT) was the highest when laccase was aminated prior to the adsorption onto the working electrode. The developed laccase biosensor sensitivity toward different phenolic compounds was assessed to determine the biosensor response with several phenolic compounds. The highest response was obtained for ABTS with a saturation value of I = 27.94 μA. The electrocatalytic efficiency (I/K) was the highest for ABTS (5588 μA μM) followed by syringaldazine (3014 μA.μM). The sensors were considerably stable, whereby 99.5, 82 and 77% of the catalytic response using catechol as substrate was retained after 4, 8 and 10 successive cycles of reuse respectively, with response time average of 5 s for 12 cycles. No loss of activity was observed after 20 days of storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.03.049DOI Listing
June 2020

Correction to: Biosynthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles induced by fungal proteins and its application in different biological activities.

J Genet Eng Biotechnol 2020 Feb 11;18(1). Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Microbial Chemistry Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, Giza, 12622, Egypt.

In the publication of this article [1], the title of Figure 6 was missing. The original article has been corrected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s43141-020-0022-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7013011PMC
February 2020

Biosynthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles induced by fungal proteins and its application in different biological activities.

J Genet Eng Biotechnol 2019 Nov 1;17(1). Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Microbial Chemistry Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, Giza, 12622, Egypt.

Background: The present study aims to apply an efficient eco-friendly and inexpensive process for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the mediation of fungal proteins from Aspergillus fumigatus DSM819, characterization, and its application as antimicrobial finishing agent in textile fabrics against some infectious microorganisms.

Results: Optimum conditions for AgNP biosynthesis could be achieved by means of using 60% (v/v) of cell-free filtrate (CFF) and 1.5 mM of AgNO at pH 10.0 after 90 min. The obtained AgNPs were of spherical shape with 90% of distribution below than 84.4 nm. The biosynthesized AgNPs exerted an antimicrobial activity against the studied pathogenic microorganisms (E. coli, B. mycoides, and C. albicans). In addition, IC values against in vitro tumor cell lines were found to be 31.1, 45.4, 40.9, and 33.5 μg/ml for HCT116, A549, MCF7, and PC3, respectively. Even with a very low concentration (0.25%), the treated PET/C fabrics by AgNPs exerted an antimicrobial activity against E. coli, B. mycoides, and C. albicans to give inhibition zone diameter of 15, 15, and 16 mm, respectively.

Conclusions: The green biosynthesis approach applied in this study is a non-toxic alternative to the traditional chemical and physical methods, and would be appropriate for biological large-scale production and prospective treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s43141-019-0008-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6823471PMC
November 2019

Novel natural composite films as packaging materials with enhanced properties.

Int J Biol Macromol 2019 Sep 18;136:774-784. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Microbial Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth St. [former El Tahrir st.], Dokki Giza, P. O. 12622, Egypt.

The present work was devoted to prepare novel natural composite films based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), gelatin and/or shellac. Four composites films series were prepared by altering the film compositions from CMC and gelatin or shellac. The composite films were prepared by solution casting in presence of glycerol (30% weight). Films were characterized by SEM, air permeability (porosity), tensile strength, burst strength, TGA and WVP. Antimicrobial activity in opposition to E. coli, B. mycoides and C. albicans were also investigated. The results revealed that, films exhibit flexibility with good antimicrobial, tensile strength, homogeneity, transparency, elongation properties, reduce porosity & air permeability and without signs of particles aggregation. Gelatin/CMC (50/50%) film was the most important one with respect to thermal stability, which exhibit a high thermal stability up to 800 °C. This study opens the door to use cellulosic composite materials to produce environmentally friendly, low-cost and sustainable packaging materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2019.06.130DOI Listing
September 2019

Application of response surface methodology to optimize the extracellular fungal mediated nanosilver green synthesis.

J Genet Eng Biotechnol 2017 Dec 10;15(2):497-504. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Department of Microbial Chemistry, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Division, National Research Centre (NRC), 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, 12622 Giza, Egypt.

This study aims to optimize the biosynthesis of nanosilver particles mediated by ATCC36838 using response surface methodology (RSM). Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesized effectively in terms of the factors impacting silver ion (Ag) reduction to metallic nanosilver (Ag) using culture filtrate under shaking condition. The results of statistics calculations revealed that 2 mM silver nitrate and 28% (v/v) of culture filtrate at pH 7.0 for 34 h were the optimum values for AgNPs biosynthesis. The characterization of the produced AgNPs was conducted using electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV/visible spectrophotometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Round to oval AgNPs were detected with aspects of TEM within diameter range of 4-16 nm. The results of this study could help in developing a reliable ecofriendly, simple, and low cost process for microbial assisted AgNPs green synthesis especially with the continuous increase in its application fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgeb.2017.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296633PMC
December 2017

Purification and biochemical characterization of two isolated laccase isoforms from Agaricus bisporus CU13 and their potency in dye decolorization.

Int J Biol Macromol 2018 Jul 12;113:1142-1148. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Microbial Chemistry Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, 12622 Giza, Egypt.

Agaricus bisporus CU13 laccase was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation (40-80%), Sephadex G100, and DEAE Sephadex A50 anion exchange column chromatography, respectively. Two laccase isoenzymes (Lacc1 & Lacc2) with purification folds of 1.40 and 5.81 respectively, were obtained from DEAE Sephadex A50 column. Optimal temperature and pH were recorded at 55 °C and pH 5.0 for both laccase isoenzymes using ABTS as substrate. Lacc1 was more thermostable than Lacc2 with residual activity of 95, 80 and 6%, while Lacc2 only retained 72, 25 and 0.4% of its activity after incubation for 90 min. at 50, 60 and 70 °C, respectively. Lacc2 retained about 93 and 86% of the initial activity at pH 9.0 and 7.0, whereas Lacc1 was stable at pH 7.0 and 5.0 followed by pH 9.0 and retained about 87, 76, and 36% of its activity respectively, after 4 h of incubation. Lacc1 was activated by 40% in the presence of Cu (10 mM). K and V values found to be 0.394 and 0.158 μM, and 0.1351 and 0.4755 μmol min for Lacc1 and Lacc2, respectively. The efficiency of both isoenzymes to decolorize Acid blue dye, make the enzyme seems to be a prospective for further biotechnological applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.03.043DOI Listing
July 2018

Optimization of silver nanoparticles biosynthesis mediated by NRC1731 through application of statistical methods: enhancement and characterization.

3 Biotech 2018 Mar 15;8(3):132. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Microbial Chemistry Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Division, National Research Centre (NRC), 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, Giza, 12622 Egypt.

The fungal-mediated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) biosynthesis optimization via the application of central composite design (CCD) response surface to develop an effective ecofriendly and inexpensive green process was the aim of the current study. Nanosilver biosynthesis using the NRC1731 cell-free filtrate (CFF) was studied through involving the most parameters affecting the AgNPs green synthesis and its interactions effects. The statistical optimization models showed that using 59.37% of CFF in reaction containing 1.82 mM silver nitrate for 34 h at pH 7.0 is the optimum value to optimize the AgNPs biosynthesis. The obtained AgNPs were characterized by means of electron microscopy, UV/visible spectrophotometry, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and infrared spectroscopy to elucidate its almost spherical shape with diameter of 3-20 nm. The produced AgNPs exhibited a considerable antimicrobial activity against , in addition to .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-018-1158-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5814388PMC
March 2018

Physiological studies on carboxymethyl cellulase formation by Aspergillus terreus DSM 826.

Braz J Microbiol 2012 Jan 1;43(1):1-11. Epub 2012 Jun 1.

Department of Microbial Chemistry, National Research Centre , Dokki, Cairo , Egypt.

Physiological studies were conducted to determine the optimum cultural conditions for maximal carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) formation by Aspergillus terreus DSM 826. Shaking condition at 150 rpm is favorable for the production of CMCase from rice straw and sugar cane bagasse. The highest enzyme yield was obtained at the third day of incubation at 30 °C for both cases; however CMCase formation occurred at a broad range of pH values, with maximal formation of A. terreus DSM 826 CMCase at pH 4.5 and 5.0 when rice straw and sugar cane bagasse were used as sole carbon source, respectively. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was found to be a good inducer for CMCase formation in both agricultural wastes with CMC concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 % (w/v) in case of rice straw and sugar cane bagasse, respectively. High level of enzyme formation was obtained with the addition of ammonium chloride as nitrogen source in both cases and at a concentration of 0.4 % (v/v Tween-80) as an addition to medium containing rice straw. However this addition did not influence the production of CMCase in case of using sugar cane bagasse as carbon source.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1517-83822012000100001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3768957PMC
January 2012

Purification and properties of an endoglucanase of Aspergillus terreus DSM 826.

J Basic Microbiol 2009 Oct;49(5):426-32

Department of Microbial Chemistry, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt.

Endoglucanase (EG) from A. terreus DSM 826 grown on sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source was purified using acetone fractionation, then a Sepharose-4B chromatographic column, with purification of about 27-fold and 10.5% recovery. The optimum temperature and pH for activity of the purified EG were found to be 50 degrees C and pH 4.8, respectively. The purified enzyme can stand heating up to 50 degrees C for 1 h without apparent loss of activity. However, the enzyme, incubated at 80 degrees C for 5 min, showed about 56% loss of activity. Optimum EG activity was recorded with a citrate buffer system (pH 4.8; 0.05 M). Co2+ (2.5 x 10(-2) M) and Zn2+ (5 x 10(-2) M) were found to activate the purified EG of A. terreus DSM 826 by about 83 and 25%, respectively. On the other hand, Hg2+ inhibited the activity of the purified EG by about 50 and 71% at a concentration of 2.5 x 10(-2) and 5 x 10(-2) M, respectively. Carboxymethyl cellulose was found to be the best substrate for the purified EG, with V(max) values of 4.35 micrpmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jobm.200800227DOI Listing
October 2009