Publications by authors named "Abdelkrim Saadi"

7 Publications

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Bi-allelic HPDL Variants Cause a Neurodegenerative Disease Ranging from Neonatal Encephalopathy to Adolescent-Onset Spastic Paraplegia.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 08 23;107(2):364-373. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Institute of Medical Genetics and Applied Genomics, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany; Centre for Rare Diseases, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address:

We report bi-allelic pathogenic HPDL variants as a cause of a progressive, pediatric-onset spastic movement disorder with variable clinical presentation. The single-exon gene HPDL encodes a protein of unknown function with sequence similarity to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. Exome sequencing studies in 13 families revealed bi-allelic HPDL variants in each of the 17 individuals affected with this clinically heterogeneous autosomal-recessive neurological disorder. HPDL levels were significantly reduced in fibroblast cell lines derived from more severely affected individuals, indicating the identified HPDL variants resulted in the loss of HPDL protein. Clinical presentation ranged from severe, neonatal-onset neurodevelopmental delay with neuroimaging findings resembling mitochondrial encephalopathy to milder manifestation of adolescent-onset, isolated hereditary spastic paraplegia. All affected individuals developed spasticity predominantly of the lower limbs over the course of the disease. We demonstrated through bioinformatic and cellular studies that HPDL has a mitochondrial localization signal and consequently localizes to mitochondria suggesting a putative role in mitochondrial metabolism. Taken together, these genetic, bioinformatic, and functional studies demonstrate HPDL is a mitochondrial protein, the loss of which causes a clinically variable form of pediatric-onset spastic movement disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.06.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7413886PMC
August 2020

Analyses of LMNA-negative juvenile progeroid cases confirms biallelic POLR3A mutations in Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch-like syndrome and expands the phenotypic spectrum of PYCR1 mutations.

Hum Genet 2018 Dec 19;137(11-12):921-939. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.

Juvenile segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ starting in childhood. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), caused by a recurrent de novo synonymous LMNA mutation resulting in aberrant splicing and generation of a mutant product called progerin, is a prototypical example of such disorders. Here, we performed a joint collaborative study using massively parallel sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing, aimed at delineating the underlying genetic cause of 14 previously undiagnosed, clinically heterogeneous, non-LMNA-associated juvenile progeroid patients. The molecular diagnosis was achieved in 11 of 14 cases (~ 79%). Furthermore, we firmly establish biallelic mutations in POLR3A as the genetic cause of a recognizable, neonatal, Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch-like progeroid syndrome. Thus, we suggest that POLR3A mutations are causal for a portion of under-diagnosed early-onset segmental progeroid syndromes. We additionally expand the clinical spectrum associated with PYCR1 mutations by showing that they can somewhat resemble HGPS in the first year of life. Moreover, our results lead to clinical reclassification in one single case. Our data emphasize the complex genetic and clinical heterogeneity underlying progeroid disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-018-1957-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6652186PMC
December 2018

AMPA-receptor specific biogenesis complexes control synaptic transmission and intellectual ability.

Nat Commun 2017 07 4;8:15910. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

Institute of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 7, Freiburg 79104, Germany.

AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), key elements in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain, are macromolecular complexes whose properties and cellular functions are determined by the co-assembled constituents of their proteome. Here we identify AMPAR complexes that transiently form in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lack the core-subunits typical for AMPARs in the plasma membrane. Central components of these ER AMPARs are the proteome constituents FRRS1l (C9orf4) and CPT1c that specifically and cooperatively bind to the pore-forming GluA1-4 proteins of AMPARs. Bi-allelic mutations in the human FRRS1L gene are shown to cause severe intellectual disability with cognitive impairment, speech delay and epileptic activity. Virus-directed deletion or overexpression of FRRS1l strongly impact synaptic transmission in adult rat brain by decreasing or increasing the number of AMPARs in synapses and extra-synaptic sites. Our results provide insight into the early biogenesis of AMPARs and demonstrate its pronounced impact on synaptic transmission and brain function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15910DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5500892PMC
July 2017

Mutations in TBCK, Encoding TBC1-Domain-Containing Kinase, Lead to a Recognizable Syndrome of Intellectual Disability and Hypotonia.

Am J Hum Genet 2016 Apr 31;98(4):782-8. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Through an international multi-center collaboration, 13 individuals from nine unrelated families and affected by likely pathogenic biallelic variants in TBC1-domain-containing kinase (TBCK) were identified through whole-exome sequencing. All affected individuals were found to share a core phenotype of intellectual disability and hypotonia, and many had seizures and showed brain atrophy and white-matter changes on neuroimaging. Minor non-specific facial dysmorphism was also noted in some individuals, including multiple older children who developed coarse features similar to those of storage disorders. TBCK has been shown to regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is also stimulated by exogenous leucine supplementation. TBCK was absent in cells from affected individuals, and decreased phosphorylation of phospho-ribosomal protein S6 was also observed, a finding suggestive of downregulation of mTOR signaling. Lastly, we demonstrated that activation of the mTOR pathway in response to L-leucine supplementation was retained, suggesting a possible avenue for directed therapies for this condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.03.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833465PMC
April 2016

Refining the phenotype associated with CASC5 mutation.

Neurogenetics 2016 Jan 1;17(1):71-8. Epub 2015 Dec 1.

INSERM UMR 1163, Laboratory of Molecular and Pathophysiological Bases of Cognitive Disorders, Imagine Institute, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité University, 75015, Paris, France.

Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by congenitally reduced head circumference by at least two standard deviations (SD) below the mean for age and gender. It is associated with nonprogressive mental retardation of variable degree, minimal neurological deficit with no evidence of architectural anomalies of the brain. So far, 12 genetic loci (MCPH1-12) and corresponding genes have been identified. Most of these encode centrosomal proteins. CASC5 is one the most recently unravelled genes responsible for MCPH with mutations reported in three consanguineous families of Moroccan origin, all of whom harboured the same CASC5 homozygous mutation (c.6125G>A; p.Met2041Ile). Here, we report the identification, by whole exome sequencing, of the same missense mutation in a consanguineous Algerian family. All patients exhibited a similar clinical phenotype, including congenital microcephaly with head circumferences ranging from -3 to -4 standard deviations (SD) after age 5 years, moderate to severe cognitive impairment, short stature (adult height -3 SD), dysmorphic features included a sloping forehead, thick eyebrows, synophris and a low columella. Severe vermis hypoplasia and a large cyst of the posterior fossa were observed in one patient. Close microsatellite markers showed identical alleles in the Algerian the previously and Moroccan patients. This study confirms the involvement of CASC5 in autosomal recessive microcephaly and supports the hypothesis of a founder effect of the c.6125G>A mutation. In addition, this report refines the phenotype of this newly recognized form of primary microcephaly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10048-015-0468-7DOI Listing
January 2016

Mutation in TTI2 reveals a role for triple T complex in human brain development.

Hum Mutat 2013 Nov 10;34(11):1472-6. Epub 2013 Sep 10.

INSERM U781, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Institut IMAGINE, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, France.

Tel2-interacting proteins 1 and 2 (TTI1 and TTI2) physically interact with telomere maintenance 2 (TEL2) to form a conserved trimeric complex called the Triple T complex. This complex is a master regulator of phosphoinositide-3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKKs) abundance and DNA damage response signaling. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and high-throughput sequencing in a large consanguineous multiplex family, we found that a missense c.1307T>A/p.I436N mutation in TTI2 causes a human autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe cognitive impairment, microcephaly, behavioral troubles, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and facial dysmorphic features. Immunoblotting experiment showed decreased amount of all Triple T complex components in the patient skin fibroblasts. Consistently, a drastically reduced steady-state level of all PIKKs tested was also observed in the patient cells. Combined with previous observations, these findings emphasises the role of the TTI2 gene in the etiology of intellectual disability and further support the role of PIKK signaling in brain development and functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22399DOI Listing
November 2013

Compound heterozygous ASPM mutations associated with microcephaly and simplified cortical gyration in a consanguineous Algerian family.

Eur J Med Genet 2009 Jul-Aug;52(4):180-4. Epub 2009 Mar 28.

Department of Neurology, Etablissement hospitalier spécialisé de Benaknoun, and Department of Biochemistry, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Mustapha Bacha, Algiers, Algeria.

Homozygous mutations in the ASPM gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). Here we report on a consanguineous Algerian family in which three out of five children presented with severe microcephaly, simplified cortical gyration, mild to severe mental retardation and low to low-normal birth weight. Given the parental consanguinity with the unaffected parents being third cousins once removed, the most probable pattern of inheritance was autosomal recessive. Linkage and mutational analyses identified compound heterozygous truncating mutations within the ASPM gene segregating with MCPH (c.2389C>T [p.Arg797X] and c.7781_7782delAG [p.Gln2594fsX6]). These results highlight some of the pitfalls of genetic analysis in consanguineous families. They also suggest that low birth weight may be a feature of MCPH, a finding that needs confirmation, and confirm that ASPM mutations are associated with simplified cortical gyration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2009.03.013DOI Listing
November 2009