Publications by authors named "Abdelali Lehraiki"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Compounds Triggering ER Stress Exert Anti-Melanoma Effects and Overcome BRAF Inhibitor Resistance.

Cancer Cell 2016 06 26;29(6):805-819. Epub 2016 May 26.

INSERM, U1065, Equipe Biologie et Pathologie des cellules mélanocytaire: de la pigmentation cutanée au mélanome, Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire (C3M), Bâtiment ARCHIMED, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestière, 06204 Nice cedex 3, France; UFR de Médecine, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06000 Nice, France; Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Archet II, CHU, 06204 Nice, France. Electronic address:

We have discovered and developed a series of molecules (thiazole benzenesulfonamides). HA15, the lead compound of this series, displayed anti-cancerous activity on all melanoma cells tested, including cells isolated from patients and cells that developed resistance to BRAF inhibitors. Our molecule displayed activity against other liquid and solid tumors. HA15 also exhibited strong efficacy in xenograft mouse models with melanoma cells either sensitive or resistant to BRAF inhibitors. Transcriptomic, proteomic, and biochemical studies identified the chaperone BiP/GRP78/HSPA5 as the specific target of HA15 and demonstrated that the interaction increases ER stress, leading to melanoma cell death by concomitant induction of autophagic and apoptotic mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccell.2016.04.013DOI Listing
June 2016

Increased CD271 expression by the NF-kB pathway promotes melanoma cell survival and drives acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib.

Cell Discov 2015 27;1:15030. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

INSERM, U1065, équipe 1, Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire (C3M), Nice, France; Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, UFR de Médecine, Nice, France; Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Archet II, CHU, Nice, France.

Specific BRAFV600E inhibitors (BRAFi) are highly effective in the treatment of melanoma. However, acquired drug resistances invariably develop after the initial response. Therefore, the identification of new mechanisms of acquired resistance gives important clues towards the development of therapies that could elicit long lasting responses. Here we report that CD271 confers resistance to BRAFi in melanoma cells. The expression of CD271 is increased by BRAFi through a stimulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secretion that leads to NF-κB signaling pathway activation. CD271 is upregulated in a subset of BRAFi-resistant melanoma cells. The inhibition of TNFα/NF-κB pathway and CD271 silencing restore the BRAFi sensitivity of resistant melanoma cells. Finally, increase of CD271 expression is validated in BRAFi-resistant xenografts tumors and also in tumors from the patients who relapsed under BRAFi. In summary, these results reveal a novel TNFα/NF-κB/CD271 axis whose activation contributes to the acquisition of resistance to BRAFi and therefore may represent a novel therapeutic target to improve the efficacy of therapy in melanoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/celldisc.2015.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860830PMC
July 2016

Inhibition of melanogenesis by the antidiabetic metformin.

J Invest Dermatol 2014 Oct 22;134(10):2589-2597. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Biologie et Pathologie des Cellules Mélanocytaire: de la Pigmentation Cutanée au Mélanome, Equipe 1, Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire (C3M), Team 1, U1065, INSERM, Nice, France; UFR de Médecine, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France; Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Archet II, CHU, Nice, France. Electronic address:

Several reports have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of metformin, a widely used drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, on the proliferation of many cancers including melanoma. Recently, it has been shown that metformin is able to modulate the cAMP level in the liver. As cAMP has a crucial role in melanin synthesis and skin pigmentation, we investigated the effect of metformin on melanogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We showed that metformin led to reduced melanin content in melanoma cells and in normal human melanocytes by decreasing cAMP accumulation and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation. This inhibitory effect is correlated with decreased expression of master genes of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, dopachrome tautomerase, and tyrosinase-related protein 1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the antimelanogenic effect of metformin is independent of the AMPK pathway. Interestingly, topical application of metformin induced tail whitening in mice. Finally, we confirmed the antimelanogenic effect of metformin on reconstituted human epidermis and on human skin biopsies. These data emphasize the depigmenting effect of metformin and suggest a clinical strategy for using metformin in the topical treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jid.2014.202DOI Listing
October 2014

Concerns about the widespread use of rodent models for human risk assessments of endocrine disruptors.

Reproduction 2014 6;147(4):R119-29. Epub 2014 Mar 6.

Unit of Stem Cells and Radiation, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

Fetal testis is a major target of endocrine disruptors (EDs). During the last 20 years, we have developed an organotypic culture system that maintains the function of the different fetal testis cell types and have used this approach as a toxicological test to evaluate the effects of various compounds on gametogenesis and steroidogenesis in rat, mouse and human testes. We named this test rat, mouse and human fetal testis assay. With this approach, we compared the effects of six potential EDs ((mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), cadmium, depleted uranium, diethylstilboestrol (DES), bisphenol A (BPA) and metformin) and one signalling molecule (retinoic acid (RA)) on the function of rat, mouse and human fetal testis at a comparable developmental stage. We found that the response is similar in humans and rodents for only one third of our analyses. For instance, RA and MEHP have similar negative effects on gametogenesis in the three species. For another third of our analyses, the threshold efficient concentrations that disturb gametogenesis and/or steroidogenesis differ as a function of the species. For instance, BPA and metformin have similar negative effects on steroidogenesis in human and rodents, but at different threshold doses. For the last third of our analyses, the qualitative response is species specific. For instance, MEHP and DES affect steroidogenesis in rodents, but not in human fetal testis. These species differences raise concerns about the extrapolation of data obtained in rodents to human health risk assessment and highlight the need of rigorous comparisons of the effects in human and rodent models, when assessing ED risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-13-0497DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3959776PMC
January 2015

Metformin blocks melanoma invasion and metastasis development in AMPK/p53-dependent manner.

Mol Cancer Ther 2013 Aug 5;12(8):1605-15. Epub 2013 Jun 5.

Equipe Biologie et Pathologie des cellulesmelanocytaire: de la pigmentation cutanee au melanome, Centre Mediterraneen de Medecine Moleculaire (C3M), INSERM, U1065.

Metformin was reported to inhibit the proliferation of many cancer cells, including melanoma cells. In this report, we investigated the effect of metformin on melanoma invasion and metastasis development. Using different in vitro approaches, we found that metformin inhibits cell invasion without affecting cell migration and independently of antiproliferation action. This inhibition is correlated with modulation of expression of proteins involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition such as Slug, Snail, SPARC, fibronectin, and N-cadherin and with inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation. Furthermore, our data indicate that this process is dependent on activation of AMPK and tumor suppressor protein p53. Finally, we showed that metformin inhibits melanoma metastasis development in mice using extravasation and metastasis models. The presented data reinforce the fact that metformin might be a good candidate for clinical trial in melanoma treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-12-1226-TDOI Listing
August 2013

Genistein impairs early testosterone production in fetal mouse testis via estrogen receptor alpha.

Toxicol In Vitro 2011 Dec 23;25(8):1542-7. Epub 2011 May 23.

Laboratory of Gonad Differentiation and Radiobiology, Stem Cells and Radiation Service, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Life Sciences Division, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, B.P. 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

The widespread consumption of soy-based products raises the issue of the reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens. Indeed, it is well known that genistein, an isoflavone found in soybeans and soy products, mimics the actions of estrogens and that the fetal testis is responsive to estrogens. Therefore we investigated whether genistein could have deleterious effects on fetal testis. Using organ cultures of fetal testes from wild type and ERα or ERβ knock-out mice we show that genistein inhibits testosterone secretion by fetal Leydig cells during early fetal development (E12.5), within the "masculinization programming window". This effect occurs through an ERα-dependent mechanism and starting at 10 nM genistein, a concentration which is compatible with human consumption. No effect of genistein on the number of gonocytes was detected at any of the studied developmental stages. These results suggest that fetal exposure to phytoestrogens can affect the development and function of the male reproductive system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2011.05.017DOI Listing
December 2011

Antagonistic effects of gestational dietary exposure to low-dose vinclozolin and genistein on rat fetal germ cell development.

Reprod Toxicol 2011 May 21;31(4):424-30. Epub 2010 Dec 21.

Laboratory of Gonad Differentiation and Radiobiology, Stem Cells and Radiation Service, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Life Sciences Division, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France

Continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (1 mg/kg/day genistein) and/or to an antiandrogenic food contaminant (1 mg/kg/day vinclozolin) has been recently reported to affect male reproductive tract and fertility [1] in adults. We investigated whether alterations of the testis are already present at the end of in utero exposure using the same rat model and doses following exposure from conception to delivery. After vinclozolin exposure, we observed in the neonate a slight but significant alteration of steroidogenesis and gametogenesis with a reduction of testosterone secretion and of the number of gonocytes. In contrast, genistein exposure had no effect. While the vinclozolin-genistein mixture acts in a synergistic manner to induce the most significant alterations in the adult, interestingly, genistein antagonized the deleterious effect of vinclozolin on germ cells in the neonate. This difference emphasizes the importance of studying the effects of endocrine disruptors during various developmental stages to understand their effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2010.12.005DOI Listing
May 2011

Extraction of lignans from flaxseed and evaluation of their biological effects on breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

J Med Food 2010 Aug;13(4):834-41

Biology of Plantes and Insects, EA 3900, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France.

Over the last decade, there has been an increasing interest in using flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) in diet in order to improve nutritional and health status. Lignans are major components of flaxseed. Therefore an extraction procedure for lignans from flaxseed has been optimized. The influence of some parameters was investigated: first the preliminary extraction step with alcoholic solvent, and then the solvent polarity and pH of the extract. All these conditions affected the total lignan content, but the most critical variables were preliminary extraction and solvent polarity. The optimized procedure, consisting of a direct hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid (1 M) at 100 degrees C for 1 hour followed by an extraction with a mixture of ethyl acetate/hexane (90:10 vol/vol), was applied to 340 g of defatted flaxseed and resulted in the isolation of secoisolariciresinol and anhydrosecoisolariciresinol with a purity of 97% and 98%, respectively, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The ability of these two compounds and that of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside to modulate the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines was assessed. Our results show that lignans modulate development of breast cancer cells. The most intense effect was observed for anhydrosecoisolariciresinol, which significantly decreased cell growth at 50 and 100 microM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2009.0172DOI Listing
August 2010

Adverse effects of endocrine disruptors on the foetal testis development: focus on the phthalates.

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2009 ;47(5):S67-74

Laboratory of Differentiation and Radiobiology of the Gonads, CEA - DSV / iRCM / SCSR, F-92265 Fontenay aux Roses, France Université Paris, Diderot-Paris7, F-92265, Fontenay aux Roses, France INSERM, Unité 967, F-92265, Fontenay aux Roses, France.

There are great concerns about the increasing incidence of abnormalities in male reproductive function. Human sperm counts have markedly dropped and the rate of testicular cancer has clearly augmented over the past four decades. Moreover, the prevalence rates of cryptorchidism and hypospadias are also probably increasing. It has been hypothesized that all these adverse trends in male reproduction result from abnormalities in the development of the testis during foetal and neonatal life. Furthermore, many recent epidemiological, clinical and experimental data suggest that these male reproductive disorders could be due to the effects of xenobiotics termed endocrine disruptors, which are becoming more and more concentrated and prevalent in our environment. Among these endocrine disruptors, we chose to focus this review on the phthalates for different reasons: 1) they are widespread in the environment; 2) their concentrations in many human biological fluids have been measured; 3) the experimental data using rodent models suggesting a reprotoxicity are numerous and are the most convincing; 4) their deleterious effects on the in vivo and in vitro development and function of the rat foetal testis have been largely studied; 5) some epidemiological data in humans suggest a reprotoxic effect at environmental concentrations at least during neonatal life. However, the direct effects of phthalates on human foetal testis have never been explored. Thus, as we did for the rat in the 1990s, we recently developed and validated an organ culture system which allows maintenance of the development of the different cell types of human foetal testis. In this system, addition of 10-4 M MEHP (mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate), the most produced phthalate, had no effect on basal or LH-stimulated production of testosterone, but it reduced the number of germ cells by increasing their apoptosis, without modification of their proliferation. This is the first experimental demonstration that phthalates alter the development of the foetal testis in humans. Using our organotypic culture system, we and others are currently investigating the effect of MEHP in the mouse and the rat, and it will be interesting to compare the results between these species to analyse the relevance of toxicological tests based on rodent models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/v10042-009-0056-5DOI Listing
April 2016

Phthalates impair germ cell number in the mouse fetal testis by an androgen- and estrogen-independent mechanism.

Toxicol Sci 2009 Oct 10;111(2):372-82. Epub 2009 Jul 10.

Laboratory of Gonad Differentiation and Radiobiology, Stem Cells and Radiation Service, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Life Sciences Division, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

Data from experiments conducted almost exclusively in the rat have established that some phthalates have deleterious effects on the fetal testis probably due to their antiandrogenic and/or estrogenic effects, but their mechanisms of action remain unknown. A recent study reported that phthalates also have deleterious effects on human fetal testis with germ cell number, but not steroidogenesis altered. Therefore, we used organ culture of fetal testes at different stages of development to analyze the direct effects of phthalates on both steroidogenesis and gonocyte development and to determine if the effects of MEHP on these functions reported in the rat can be extended to other mammalian species. We defined specific periods of sensitivity of the fetal mouse testis to MEHP for these two functions and showed that the effects of phthalates on steroidogenesis vary with the developmental stage. Conversely, the strong deleterious effects of phthalates on germ cells were constantly present during the active phases of gonocyte development and thus share no relationship with the steroidogenic status. Moreover, all the effects of phthalates were unchanged in testes from mice deficient for estrogen (ERalphaKO or ERbetaKO) or androgen (Tfm) receptors. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that phthalates impair mouse fetal germ cell number similarly to other mammalian species, but are neither estrogenic nor antiandrogenic molecules because their effects do not involve, directly or indirectly, ER or AR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfp153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2742583PMC
October 2009